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Old 07-21-2008, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,791 posts, read 9,901,322 times
Reputation: 9929

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Adapt Electric Cars to Run "on track" - the solution to batteries.

The major hurdle for widespread adoption of the Electric Car is power storage. Everything else about an electric car is fantastic - noise, pollution, fumes, performance.

WHAT IF...
What if the same power lines put up to power the renaissance of streetcars could be tapped by private automobiles?

An electric car (or hybrid) could suddenly be freed of the limitations of the battery, at least for travel on electrified streets. With the power density of the "grid", it wouldn't be a stretch of the imagination for EV's to charge up their batteries at the same time they're cruising along. Thus they could continue on to unpowered streets, with refreshed batteries.

Of course, this begs the question, will "the System" adapt itself to such a novel solution?

I can imagine special 'entrance lanes' so that automobiles could raise their power leads, into guide slots, to prepare them for connecting to hot wires.

Perhaps that could be the next upgrade to the superhighway system. Instead of HOV lanes, a dedicated electrified rail that EVs could share.
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz spark! Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Now that's a real CON VOY.

(Suddenly, would there be an aftermarket custom shop for trolley poles and power pantographs? Electrified car race tracks? NASCAR for Lectroids?)
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Old 07-21-2008, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,989 posts, read 12,540,573 times
Reputation: 8748
With all the light rail we have in Portland, and it is being extended right now, we have terrible traffic here for such a small metro area. The traffic here is gridlocked much of the day, some of that is due to the georgraphy of the place, bridges and rivers to cross. However there has not even been one road built in this area in years and it shows. Everything is centered around transit and light rail here. A metro area of barely 2 million should not have the traffic of a area with millions more all day long. Light Rail only has 2 cars on its systems and it is not used by all that many commuters. It is used primarily by the transit dependent, tourist, and those here for conventions. Many of the transit dependent do not seem to pay fares, I doubt they can afford them or whatever their reasons. Soon it will be $3.00 each way to take a bus or train in this small city due to fare hikes scheduled and approved. Its biggest problem in the past years has been serious problems with crime on its trains. I was a big advocate of light rail before I moved to Portland and have slowly become somewhat disallusioned with it, at least in this town. I think if it is done properly and serves the masses it is an excellent form of transit. I think any area planning on light rail really should look at Portland which has been a poster child for rail for 2 decades now. I feel they should look at both the pros and cons of the systems based on how Portland has really handled it. Gridlocked roads all day long is a red warning flag in my view that the targeted population is not using the system.
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Old 07-21-2008, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,791 posts, read 9,901,322 times
Reputation: 9929
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
With all the light rail we have in Portland, and it is being extended right now, we have terrible traffic here for such a small metro area. The traffic here is gridlocked much of the day, some of that is due to the georgraphy of the place, bridges and rivers to cross. However there has not even been one road built in this area in years and it shows. Everything is centered around transit and light rail here. A metro area of barely 2 million should not have the traffic of a area with millions more all day long. Light Rail only has 2 cars on its systems and it is not used by all that many commuters. It is used primarily by the transit dependent, tourist, and those here for conventions. Many of the transit dependent do not seem to pay fares, I doubt they can afford them or whatever their reasons. Soon it will be $3.00 each way to take a bus or train in this small city due to fare hikes scheduled and approved. Its biggest problem in the past years has been serious problems with crime on its trains. I was a big advocate of light rail before I moved to Portland and have slowly become somewhat disallusioned with it, at least in this town. I think if it is done properly and serves the masses it is an excellent form of transit. I think any area planning on light rail really should look at Portland which has been a poster child for rail for 2 decades now. I feel they should look at both the pros and cons of the systems based on how Portland has really handled it. Gridlocked roads all day long is a red warning flag in my view that the targeted population is not using the system.
JG: That is outrageous. Of course, when it comes to any government authority / monopoly, inefficiency, unresponsiveness, and a money sucking monstrosity usually develops - but you already know that.

Solution?

Drive a stake through the heart of the monster -
Stop "feeding" tax money to government, and it will die....
Sigh.

But in the meantime, demand PRIVATE mass transit, exempt from taxation, and you will see efficient, customer friendly response, and an accommodating attitude. It's common sense - they only make money if the customer is satisfied. Can't say the same for taxpayer funded boondoggles.

FWIW - If critics say that electrified rail mass transit can't be profitable, just look back to 1890s - 1910s. Those early systems were built with investor money, for the most part, building power plants, laying rails, and serving their customers.

Only after more and more taxes were levied on them, did they begin their slow decline. And since the government subsidized their competitors, their doom was assured.

We can go back to the past, to save the future. But we better have our eyes open. Don't use public funds, nor become entangled in partisan politics, if you want a vibrant mass transit system.

Empower private enterprise with a complete tax exemption instead of taxpayer funding, and it will rebuild a massive mass transit system that would surprise the world.
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