U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-23-2009, 02:36 PM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12505

Advertisements

In my area, I think the issue is more in terms of infrastructure that is older than most suburbs. I live in a suburb like that, but it is still pretty safe. Communities like Mattydale, Nedrow, Galeville(Liverpool area), Lyncourt, the village of East Syracuse(including the Park Hill/Parkwood communities) and the village of Solvay fit this bill. Again, all are still pretty safe, but just have to deal with some degree of older infrastructure issues. There are some inner suburbs that still are fine like Westvale, DeWitt(cdp), Onondaga Hill and the village of Liverpool.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-24-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,100,781 times
Reputation: 5958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I thought Indianapolis annexed all their suburbs a couple decades ago. So wouldn't their "inner ring" suburbs be newer than those of most other cities?
Indianapolis merged with Marion County. The towns that ring the outside of Marion County are suburbs. Most of them are "young" and Indianapolis does not have any true inner ring suburbs unless you are counting parts of Lawrence, Beech Grove, and Speedway; none of which are dead or even dieing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2009, 10:36 PM
 
Location: St Louis County, MO
711 posts, read 1,869,804 times
Reputation: 340
Around St Louis, it seems that the inner ring burbs are still doing quite well while a few in north STL county are suffering; crime rising, malls dying, etc. The inner ring burbs are still going strong or steady, if not progressing.

Clayton, Maplewood, Richmond Heights, University City, to name a few.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 08:21 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC 38 View Post
Indianapolis merged with Marion County. The towns that ring the outside of Marion County are suburbs. Most of them are "young" and Indianapolis does not have any true inner ring suburbs unless you are counting parts of Lawrence, Beech Grove, and Speedway; none of which are dead or even dieing.
Right, Indy's "inner ring suburbs" are now the neighborhoods of the city. Same thing....different definition due to governmental changes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Triangle, North Carolina
2,819 posts, read 9,376,347 times
Reputation: 1504
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
But I wouldn't consider any area of Gwinnett to be inner-ring...and probably not Stone Mountain now that I think about it. Henry County definitely isn't inner-ring, and neither is Clayton. I would say inner ring is inside the Perimeter or just outside of it.

Is Stone Mountain in decline? Most of that area, or at least what I'm familiar with, seems to be holding up well.
True, when I think Inner ring of Atlanta I think of "inside the parameter" or 285. Gwinnett is outside of this spectrum. In regard to Gwinnett Place from a previous poster, located outside the ring by 9 miles, has seen it's decay, recently Gwinnett has enacted a CID to the area and it is seeing improvement. Also, Gwinnett has placed and acted on 287g full force and now placing all illegal alien arrests as deports and turnover to ICE, which is about darn time.

As far as Stone Mountain, to me it is like Norcross. You have the area which isn't to bad and the area that you want to stay far away from.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,100,781 times
Reputation: 5958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Same thing....different definition due to governmental changes.
Not really. An inner ring suburb would have a different mayor, police force, fire protection, ordinances, etc. and would be a completely different city. Just because Pike Township was not a part of Indianapolis in 1965 does not mean it is not a part of Indianapolis now. The mayor of Indianapolis presides over Pike Township, and the city provides all services to Pike Township except fire, school and a couple of small things. Pike is Indianapolis police, water, taxes, laws, etc. Really, Pike Township (and all the Indy townships) exists as it is because EVERY Indiana city is divided into townships. That is just the nature of Indiana government.

That is all beside the point; Pike Township isn't even dieing. My point was, earlier in this thread, Indianapolis should have NEVER even been brought up in this thread to begin with. We only have three inner-ring suburbs Beech Grove, Speedway, and Lawrence; none of which are dead or dieing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 10:12 AM
 
1,350 posts, read 3,620,899 times
Reputation: 1264
It is my impression that the "edge city" is not necessarily another municipal entity but rather the spreading of services and businesses to the outer suburb. This then creates a "city" unto itself where one doesn't have to commute into town for the shopping or schools. (The beginning of sprawl?) It was characterized I think by malls and lots of driving with no center area. Am I wrong??
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 10:58 AM
 
866 posts, read 3,825,590 times
Reputation: 281
Even though, in my opinion, there is a clear line bewteen Detroit and its suburbs you can for sure see the spill over of decline that has been happening mostly in the past decade or so. The worst areas are in the southern suburbs like River Rouge, Ecorse, and Lincoln Park. But there has also been "spill over" in the northern suburbs such as Southfield (especially up to the 10 mile area), Warren, Eastpointe, and Harper Woods on the eastside of the city. And Redford to the west.

There is some kind of "Suburban alliance" group that is trying to protect the decline of Detroit's inner suburbs, but with the terriable economy it's hard to control foreclosures.

Thankfully, many of Detroit's inner suburbs have been protected and beautifully preserved. Areas such as the Grosse Pointe's on the eastside, and Pleasant Ridge, Royal Oak, Hunington Woods, and Berkely along Woodward Ave to the north are all inner suburbs that all all been preserved and taken care of, I hope that they stay that way.

It seems like suburban sprawl has basically come to a hault in the Greater Detroit area, mainly beacuse of our local and national crisis. The newer construction seems to be in Washington Twp, Lyon Twp, Macomb Twp, Chesterfield Twp. Many of the incorporated cities are all built up here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 12:21 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,757,791 times
Reputation: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
It is my impression that the "edge city" is not necessarily another municipal entity but rather the spreading of services and businesses to the outer suburb. This then creates a "city" unto itself where one doesn't have to commute into town for the shopping or schools. (The beginning of sprawl?) It was characterized I think by malls and lots of driving with no center area. Am I wrong??
I have the book on by bookshelf, and you are not wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2009, 03:08 PM
 
866 posts, read 3,825,590 times
Reputation: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
It is my impression that the "edge city" is not necessarily another municipal entity but rather the spreading of services and businesses to the outer suburb. This then creates a "city" unto itself where one doesn't have to commute into town for the shopping or schools. (The beginning of sprawl?) It was characterized I think by malls and lots of driving with no center area. Am I wrong??
This is what slowly happend to Detroit over the years, and now there is virtually no businesses in Downtown Detroit except big corporate offices like GM and regional law firms.

NO shopping at all in Detroit, and it's neighborhoods are in major decline.

You can be a Detroit suburbanite and NEVER EVER go to the city for any reason what so ever, it's not like New York or Chicago, it's sad to see.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top