U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which US variation of pizza has the best taste
New York-style 143 50.35%
Chicago-style 92 32.39%
St. Louis-style 20 7.04%
New Haven-style 29 10.21%
Voters: 284. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-28-2009, 09:33 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,541 posts, read 17,773,692 times
Reputation: 30896

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax419 View Post
Isn't NY style just a big thin slice of pizza? Not that unique imo...pretty much what you can get from pizza hut or any other large chain but a larger size.

I picked ChicagoStyle b/c it's different and freaking delicious
Isn't Chicago-style pizza just an overcooked frozen Lasagna? Pretty much what you can get in any freezer case of any grocery store in America but with only one noodle (the crust) lining the pan.


ABQConvict
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-28-2009, 09:58 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,541 posts, read 17,773,692 times
Reputation: 30896
In response to another poster's comment about NY Pizza being "mainly Italian", WeSoHood said,

Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
uhh... (about bold comment)
A New York pie is basically a Neapolitan (Italian) pie except for a slightly thicker crust and larger diameter to facilitate the division of the pie into roughly triangular slices that can be folded lengthwise in order to allow busy construction workers to have a quick lunch sitting on the street curb.

There are a few factors which unite and diverge in the relationship between Neapolitan Pizza and its closest relative (indeed, closer than other Italian pizzas).

Commonalities:

high-protein flour
which allows for minimal rizing and a chewy texture. (most other pizzas use a low-protein flour for its rising characteristics, important for non-thin crust and crunchy crusts.)

San Marzano tomatoes. Any NY pizzeria worth its salt uses the exact same brands of San Marzano tomatoes used in the pizzerias of Naples.

Sparing use of herbs. A little bit of basil and oregano. (Whole basil leaves are common in Naples, dried herbs in NY).

Sparing use of toppings. NY definitely has more variety, but in NY, the "everything but the kitchen sink" mentality for pizza toppings is a more recent influence from other American pizzas. 'Plain' or single toppings is very common in NY.

Divergences:

Mozzarella. Neapolitan pizzas use buffalo mozzarella from a local population of animals. NY pizzas use standard ox mozzarella. In NY, the cheese is usually, but not always shredded. Sliced mozzarella is more common but not the rule in Naples.

Cooking style. The Neapolitan pizza is so thin that it cooks in about 2 minutes. By contrast, the NY pie takes as much as 10 minutes. Other 'thick-crust' American pies can take upwards of 20 minutes to bake through. NY pizza is cooked in wood, coal or most common, deck ovens. Neapolitan pies are wood or coal only. Most American pizzas outside of NY are cooked on conveyor belts consisting of a metal screen or deck ovens.

Eating style. Neapolitan pizza is a sit-down affair. The crust is so thin that the pizzas are to serve one, served unsliced, and eaten with utensils. NY pizza was invented as a street-food alternative, edible 'on-the-go' to the Neapolitan version that NY pizza's inventors brought wiith them from the old country.


ABQConvict
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2009, 12:23 PM
 
2,097 posts, read 5,876,803 times
Reputation: 918
^^ I'm not saying that NYC doesn't have traditional style Italian.. but I've had my fair share of home made Italian (nothing beats it) and NYC pizza... They do have some similarities I suppose (the better pizza parlors in NYC). But they are different. Especially considering the location of Italy the person who makes your pizza is from

Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Isn't Chicago-style pizza just an overcooked frozen Lasagna? Pretty much what you can get in any freezer case of any grocery store in America but with only one noodle (the crust) lining the pan.


ABQConvict
Chicago-Style tastes nothing like Lasagna... not even close. Worst analogy ever. I understand you have pride in your hometowns food, but give me a freakin' break.

Both NYC and Chicago have unbelievable pizza, both unique in their own regards. Acknowledge that there are other possibilities then what NYC has to offer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,279,412 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiord View Post
Deep dish pizza is the invention of some mid-western WASP tycoon who thought he could "improve" upon pizza and make it more upscale. New Haven really does have the best pizza.
Yeah, Rudy Malnati is a real WASP-y name, and Italy is in the Midwest. Oh, and he was a real tycoon too, making a killing as a pizza chef.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Hville
1,526 posts, read 2,559,393 times
Reputation: 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Yeah, Rudy Malnati is a real WASP-y name, and Italy is in the Midwest. Oh, and he was a real tycoon too, making a killing as a pizza chef.
I thought it was Lou Malnati?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,279,412 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by FCEddie View Post
I thought it was Lou Malnati?
Nope, it was Lou's dad. Lou worked at Pizzeria Uno with his dad before striking out on his own. The Pizano's local chain is also owned by a Malnati son.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Hville
1,526 posts, read 2,559,393 times
Reputation: 470
I thought Rudy was Pizzeria Uno wasn't he, and Lou opened up the Malnati's named restaurant - right?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,279,412 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by FCEddie View Post
I thought Rudy was Pizzeria Uno wasn't he, and Lou opened up the Malnati's named restaurant - right?
Right. Pizzeria Uno is where Chicago deep-dish was invented, by Rudy, when he was the head chef there. Lou worked in the kitchen with him for a while and then opened his own place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Hville
1,526 posts, read 2,559,393 times
Reputation: 470
I have yet to try Malnati's, but I have had Giodano's and Geno's - both pretty great, but I'll take the East coast style instead.

Never had the chance to bring leftovers home from those places - how do they re-heat?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,279,412 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by FCEddie View Post
I have yet to try Malnati's, but I have had Giodano's and Geno's - both pretty great, but I'll take the East coast style instead.

Never had the chance to bring leftovers home from those places - how do they re-heat?
Never really gave it much thought. I'm prone to eating it cold. It nukes up OK, with the standard problem you have with any microwaved re-heated pizza in that the crust gets a little soggy. I've never had the patience to re-heat it in the oven.

I like Gino's East but there are better around. I don't like Giordano's stuffed pizza at all, but it seems I'm alone in that regard, everyone else seems to really like it. But there's a difference between what Gino's East and Pizzeria Uno does (deep-dish) and what Giordano's does (stuffed.) They look similar because they're both thick and they both put the sauce on top, but with stuffed pizza, they put a very thin layer of dough on top of the ingredients first and then put the sauce on top of the dough. Gino's East and Lou's and Pizzeria Uno forego the top layer of crust. It makes a slight difference in taste and texture.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top