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Old 07-17-2008, 10:13 AM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,363,187 times
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Two words when it comes to blue rural areas: College towns, Ski Towns.

Burlington, State College, Ithica, Asheville, and the list goes on and on.
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Old 07-17-2008, 03:41 PM
 
578 posts, read 1,878,385 times
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How about rural CT or rural downstate NY?
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Old 07-17-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,573 posts, read 5,654,972 times
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My advice to you: stay close to a college!!! Even traditional blue states like Vermont, Oregon and Massachusetts get pretty red in the rural areas. Your best bet would be a town like Charlottesville, Virginia which is a small "blue" city (thanks in part to the influence of the University of Virginia) swimming in a sea of red. It is a similar story in other rural college towns.
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Old 07-17-2008, 03:58 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 6,977,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
I wouldn't be so quick to advise New Hampshire when looking for a rural 'blue area'
Well, I did note that it's more libertarian than anything else. But compared to most rural areas of the country, NH is hardly that conservative, especially on social issues.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Tampa Bay
1,020 posts, read 3,070,218 times
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Its also one of the most expensive and least diverse areas. Just like a lot of other "liberal" areas. You can talk all day, but the proof is in the pudding or however that goes. Selective liberals maybe? Seems very typical.

Don't buy in to the liberal crap, conservative areas can have everything they offer. Some conservative areas are light years ahead in contributions too.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:13 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 6,977,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_pines View Post
Its also one of the most expensive and least diverse areas. Just like a lot of other "liberal" areas. You can talk all day, but the proof is in the pudding or however that goes. Selective liberals maybe? Seems very typical.
Um, living in rural NH myself, I can assure you that there is no wealthy, selective liberal class that is actively discouraging diversity. The lack of racial diversity in northern New England is simply due to historic settlement patterns. And while it may be more expensive to live here than in other parts of the country (which is true of the entire Northeast), the vast majority of people here are not wealthy by any means. Not to mention the fact that NH is largely a moderate state with libertarian leanings. Most voters here are Independents, and there are actually more registered Republicans than Democrats.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Tampa Bay
1,020 posts, read 3,070,218 times
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Good for you guys. But your inflation pattern and dog eat dog markets driven by house flippin' in the northeast is undeniable. Most of the time that takes advantage of the people with less money, often times the poor. I don't think the northeast is less diverse just because either. Thats just my opinion. I don't think many minorities have been welcomed in these rural blue areas.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:25 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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That's a pretty bold, sweeping generalization to make about a place that you don't live in.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Tampa Bay
1,020 posts, read 3,070,218 times
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Sue me.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:40 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,445,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_pines View Post
Good for you guys. But your inflation pattern and dog eat dog markets driven by house flippin' in the northeast is undeniable. Most of the time that takes advantage of the people with less money, often times the poor.
That's pretty damn ironic coming from some in Tampa, whose real estate market was flooded with speculative buyers during the boom.

From Forbes.com : "During the housing boom, Tampa was overrun with speculative investors, who, according to Moody's Economy.com, represented 25% of area property owners in 2005. Subsequent price declines have made Tampa more affordable to large parts of the population that had been priced out."
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