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View Poll Results: Which part?
appalachia 16 22.86%
ozarks 8 11.43%
other 30 42.86%
Don't waste your time 16 22.86%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-19-2008, 02:53 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Most of the Ozarks are not geographically in the South, so-to-speak. In fact, the furthest into the South they extend is into Northwestern Arkansas and Northeastern Oklahoma (which is also part of the Great Plains). They also extend into parts of Southern Illinois as well. Most of the Ozarks cover the Southern half of Missouri. So basically, the Ozarks are a cultural crossroads of sorts. The same applies to Appalachia. That map above Appalachia may not be accurate with regards to N.E. Mississippi, but it's definitely accurate otherwise. Appalachia extends into the Midwest, the South, the Southeast and the Northeast. Appalachia in West Virginia and Southeastern and Southern Ohio I would say are where the South, Northeast, and Midwest all meet in terms of culture.
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
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There is more to the south than the Ozarks and the Appalachians. There's the Gulf Coast, the Atlantic Coast, and then there's also Texas out there in a catagory of it's own. lol
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:27 PM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris19 View Post
I like many areas of the South. I like Louisiana with its Cajun/Creole culture, Kentucky with its trees and hills, Tennessee for the same and Graceland, Texas for its variety of landscapes, and the South Carolina for its beaches. I found that there are friendly people in the South.

I would not live in the South due to the humidity but like to visit it occasionally.

Having been there several times, it is still wierd for me to see trees all over the places. In the Northern Plains, there are trees around the farms, near rivers and land, and in small goves, but there are lots of open farmland. The difference is interesting and not all bad.

I am hoping to make a trip to the South next year to visit a friend who moved down there from Nebraska.
I think one factor of the treelessness of the northern plains in comparison with the south has to do with the predominant soil types in the two regions. Most of the northern plains esp. Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota westward through Nebraska and the Dakotas have glacial till and drift which made for very fertile farmland. On the other hand, the south has sandy and clayey soils with a high iron content and less nutrients, so you see a lot of hilly piney woods and hardwoods in the"bottom"s" of the hills (along creeks and bayous). Much of the south is comprised of timber plantations on these kinds of lands. The river valleys have the good soil especially the Mississippi delta. Guess where that came from? The Midwest during flooding.

In addition, the rainy, humid, and warm climate makes for rapid tree growth. The trees are all over the place down here. Once you get around Dallas you see the trees disappear rapidly as the climate starts to become semi-arid, then finally desert out near El Paso.
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:31 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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I love the coast of SC, GA and FL between Charleston and Jacksonville. The sea islands, the majestic live oaks draped with Spanish moss, the pace of life...I've been around the world but still find myself partial to this area.
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:37 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,133,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
In addition, the rainy, humid, and warm climate makes for rapid tree growth. The trees are all over the place down here. Once you get around Dallas you see the trees disappear rapidly as the climate starts to become semi-arid, then finally desert out near El Paso.
Good points. But also to note that while the tree part is true about the time one reaches Dallas, it picks back up again in what is known as the Cross Timbers region (although not the piney woods of East Texas and the Deep South), which covers a good part of North and Central Texas.

Also, the vast majority of Texas is in the humid-subtropical zone which extends west far beyond Dallas. The "tree transition" is due to changes in soil type, not climate so much.
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:40 PM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Good points. But also to note that while the tree part is true about the time one reaches Dallas, it picks back up again in what is known as the Cross Timbers region (although not the piney woods of East Texas and the Deep South), which covers a good part of North and Central Texas.

Also, the vast majority of Texas is in the humid-subtropical zone which extends west far beyond Dallas. The "tree transition" is due to changes in soil type, not climate so much.
Thanks for correcting me on this. I had forgotten about that region of Texas.
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Old 07-19-2008, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Ca2Mo2Ga2Va!
2,736 posts, read 5,958,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Shaft View Post
Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston would fit the bill for hard-working environments. But that's kind of contrary to looking for laid-back environments.
And I wouldn't consider Atlanta southern. Geographically, yes, but that's about it!
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Old 07-19-2008, 06:49 PM
 
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Asheville, NC is my favorite, in terms of beauty.

But for the purposes of working and living my everyday life, I'd choose Houston or Atlanta.
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Old 07-19-2008, 07:02 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverwing View Post
In correct terms, Appalachia covers a wide area.


When brought up in conversation, people tend to picture in their mind something very different. I think the original question is too broad. According to the map, I live in Appalachia yet I would not say that you are going to find the same qualities in my part as you would northern Alabama or eastern Kentucky.
If you will look right under where the W is in Winston-Salem, there is a place called Boone, N. C. It is next door to Blowing Rock, N. C. This is the area that is captured in the Jan Karon Mitford books. The people in this area work hard, love education, and believe in being nice to everybody. You may have to give up the night life though, but Boone is a college town so a night life is possible.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Boone-North-Carolina.html

http://www.city-data.com/city/Blowin...-Carolina.html

Last edited by NCN; 07-19-2008 at 07:10 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 04:23 PM
 
Location: bear (glasgow) de
13 posts, read 11,359 times
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The problem is everyone's definition of the South of the is totally different. People keeping shrinking the boundaries of the the region. Many remove Maryland and Delaware, some Virginia, some Florida,and others Texas and Oklahoma. Some add the former Border State Missouri and others southern New Jersey. The US Census definition is probably the best. The South isn't defined by who drinks Coke or sweet Tea. The South is the generally the part of the East with the mildest winters . The South has the large non-urban black population, lacking elsewhere. The South has the highest violent crime rate. The South has generally has a populace that is more morally conservative than much of the US, but many areas of have a very large out-migration of Northerners who are much more liberal. The South was once thought of to be mostly Protestant, except south Louisiana and peninsular Florida. Today the census-designated South has largest percentage of Catholics found in any region. Generally think of the South in regions- the Deep South- as the Gulf Coast States plus Georgia; the mid South- all of the non-debatable states- the Carolinas and Tennessee and Arkansas; and finally the Upper South- Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Kentucky, Oklahoma, and recently added Virginia. All states in the upper South have areas that are more Southern and other areas are more similar to the Northeast and Midwest. Delaware for instance has areas that most residents came from the North (Wilmington, Newark, and northward {north of 1-95,} and retirement/ resort areas of Sussex County but these are the areas of Delaware most non-residents are familiar with.
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