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Old 12-05-2008, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,506 posts, read 7,311,904 times
Reputation: 2017

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BudinAk View Post
My wife is in the same boat: she is 1/2 Cherokee, but we can't prove it. Why not? Because....on her dad's birth certificate, instead of it saying "Cherokee", it says "white". He was not white, but 100% Cherokee Indian. Apparently, back in those days, in that part of the country (South Carolina), you were either white, or black....there was nothing else. (???)
Her dad is deceased now 10 years, so it's not like he can go back to his birth place and correct anything...besides, the birth certificate is what it is...an old (incorrect) record...

So now what do we do?

Bud

Back then, being native American or 1/2 native was consider as being the worst thing in America. My Great Grandmother( that is deceased) was 1/2 Cherokee, 1/2 Creole, so my Grandfather is over 25% Native. They didn't have a box for Native Americans so they had to either pick Black, White, or maybe Mulatto. Its hard to prove if you are partial or 1/8 Native, because you don't have actual proof on paper.
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Old 01-30-2011, 08:35 PM
 
1 posts, read 701 times
Reputation: 10
how can I find out if my family has any indian blood, my father always said that are mother was Navaho?
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:04 AM
 
1 posts, read 510 times
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Well concidering my greatgrandparents told me that when they were growing up you didn't admit that you were Indian. It was shamful. Which angers me that they were made to feel this way about our heritage. That being Indian was worse then being black. And that's why many Indians married whites to give there children a better chance at life. My maternal Great-Greatgrandparents were both more then half Cherokee Indian. My greatgrandmother told me these things In her last year of life. When she finally felt it was safe to share them. It saddens me that she grew up and hid in shame her Indian heritage. What kinda government and people would make another person shameful of being the first true natural born americans. Wow!
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Old 11-20-2012, 03:28 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,998,915 times
Reputation: 1798
Here's my proof

Elizabeth Jane Smith 1834 - 1919 Cumberland, KY

I typed in one of my great grandparent's name in and started tracing it back. This was the only ancestor that had a picture and she's definitely Native America. Of course, I can't really prove it just based on that page
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Old 11-21-2012, 04:20 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 719,916 times
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Do you know which Cherokee tribe she may belong to? There are three federally recognized Cherokee tribes; the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians (Oklahoma), and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (North Carolina).
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Old 05-31-2015, 12:23 PM
 
277 posts, read 481,605 times
Reputation: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by BudinAk View Post
My wife is in the same boat: she is 1/2 Cherokee, but we can't prove it. Why not? Because....on her dad's birth certificate, instead of it saying "Cherokee", it says "white". He was not white, but 100% Cherokee Indian. Apparently, back in those days, in that part of the country (South Carolina), you were either white, or black....there was nothing else. (???)
Her dad is deceased now 10 years, so it's not like he can go back to his birth place and correct anything...besides, the birth certificate is what it is...an old (incorrect) record...

So now what do we do?

Bud
Sure he wasn't White. But I'm sure he "looked" Indian

Before anyone else get's any bright ideas to use this "I can't prove it excuse" unless one is adopted or estranged from their family save yourself any humiliation.....Anyone who is "Cherokee" we can prove it. We are registered Cherokee, as our ancestors before us were also registered on various Cherokee rolls; Pre, During and Post removal. Anyone Cherokee would never use the term "1/2 Cherokee." You either are or you are not. If you are only of ancestry, you are noted with a Cherokee ancestor either to the western rolls for the Keetoowah and the Nation or the eastern rolls, Eastern Band. That is proving it even if you have no card. She cannot be Cherokee if she cannot prove it!!! If she cannot prove it, she has no known ancestors being documented with a Cherokee tribe, let alone having an ancestor being enumerated as a "taxed Indian" living in the general population census.
Indians, we need to prove how Indian we are, through something called a pedigree, that dirty thing called BQ the government makes us do. When we say, we are 1/2, 2/16 etc...we provided proof. As we see, we have people who can't prove it making up any kind of blood degree...but can't prove it. Even fullblooded Indians by race need to prove their tribal pedigree, so there is no exception for this silliness going on here a 1/2 Cherokee that can't prove it. There are people 1/256 Cherokee which can prove it.

We've heard the birth certificate excuse, the population census excuse (ancestors being enumerated White). Why would his birth Certificate say "Cherokee?" Are his (father's) parents registered Cherokee? We know that answer is, no. The US government defines Cherokee legally as someone belonging and/or being a recognized member of the Cherokee people. He's "White" on the birth certificate because that is what his parents were. When that child was born, they didn't see a mulatto, Indian or what is that baby, no they saw White just like his mom and dad.

But you asked the question (with confusion). You may not like my response but, that's whats for dinner.


Quote:
Originally Posted by I LOVE PA! View Post
My daughter is one quarter American Indian and has heard she might be eligible for some scholarships for American Indians. Some require proof.
How do I prove that my father-in-law is an American Indian? He has never belonged to a tribe.
Anyone know?
Old post but worth a flogging....Before you go looking for money, why don't you find out about the tribe and people and the culture you are claiming. Ever visit a poor reservation? Many are a mess and they live in poverty. If she is not Native American now after the transfer of funds she will be? Since your intentions are in the opening post and I always believe first impressions, please feel free to take your hand and place it back in your own pockets.

Last edited by AppalachianGumbo; 05-31-2015 at 01:28 PM..
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