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Old 09-23-2008, 02:11 AM
 
Location: San Diego
939 posts, read 2,831,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairbanks101 View Post
Fairbanks, AK

a boat loaded with supplies couldn't go up river any farther. So they got out and set up shop trading with miners. THE END

what a rich history. can you see russia from fairbanks? jk, lol.
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Old 09-23-2008, 06:58 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,085,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
Marthasville??? Sounds like a really happenin' place! LOL Thank goodness they changed it!
It was named in honor of Martha Lumpkin, daughter of the governor.
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Old 09-23-2008, 07:09 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,085,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
What about the town you live in?
Well, Decatur is actually suburban Atlanta, but if you care...
Decatur was founded in 1823 (nineteen years before Atlanta) at the intersection of two long-used Native American trails. The Western & Atlantic RR wanted to locate their southern terminus in Decatur, but they declined because of the prospect of noise and fumes. W&A then located their terminus 6 miles to the WSW...and Atlanta was born.
So if not for our little city's delicate sensibilities, we would have been Atlanta.
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Old 09-23-2008, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,664,847 times
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Sorry for the plagiarism, but the citys' official websites explain this better than I can.

Massillon Ohio - City of Massillon - History
"James Duncan arrived in 1816 from Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Duncan grazed sheep on the "plains," formerly the cornfields of the Indians."

"Duncan also owned a quarter section of land which is now a part of downtown Massillon. The purchase of this land was made for the water power of Sippo Creek on which he constructed a dam and erected a flouring mill, a saw mill, and a tannery."

"In 1826, Duncan purchased farm land adjoining that which he already owned and laid out a town of 165 lots... Mrs. Duncan named the town Massillon in honor of the famous Court Preacher to Louis IV of France-Jean Baptiste Massillon, Bishop of Cleremont."

Youngstown Ohio - City of Youngstown, Ohio - About Youngstown - History
"The City of Youngstown, named for John Young, was incorporated in 1867. Mr. Young purchased approximately 15,000 acres (the entire township) for slightly more than $16,000 in 1797 from the United States Government through the Connecticut Western Reserve Land Company. By 1798 more families were settling in the Mahoning Valley between the Mahoning River and Mill Creek Park."

"By 1820, Youngstown's population began to grow, as well as industrialization, with the opening of the Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal. This waterway, abandoned in 1872, was replaced by railroads thereby attracting more people and industries in ever increasing volume."

"In 1876, the Mahoning County Seat was moved from Canfield to Youngstown, with the city's population growing to 33,220 by 1890. The first steel company was established in the Mahoning Valley, changing Youngstown industry from iron to steel which was the forerunner of miles of steel plants in the valley."
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Old 09-23-2008, 11:24 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,060,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
Marthasville??? Sounds like a really happenin' place! LOL Thank goodness they changed it!
You think that's bad, St. Paul originated as a trading post run out of a cave in the bluff of the Mississippi River. The guy who ran the trading post was a trapper named Pierre Parrant. Parrant had a deformed eye, which earned him the nickname of Pig's Eye. His trading post was called Pig's Eye by those who frequented it, and a settlement arouse around it, called Pig's Eye Landing. Many years later, Father Lucien Galtier showed up and started a church in the settlement which he named St. Paul. Luckily, that's the name that stuck to the settlement, and eventually the city.

Today, there is still a lake in the city called Pig's Eye. It's kind of a backwater of the river, surrounded by railroad yards and the city sewerage plant. There is also a "local" beer called Pig's Eye, but it's not brewed here any more.
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Old 09-23-2008, 11:26 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,060,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Well, Decatur is actually suburban Atlanta, but if you care...
Decatur was founded in 1823 (nineteen years before Atlanta) at the intersection of two long-used Native American trails. The Western & Atlantic RR wanted to locate their southern terminus in Decatur, but they declined because of the prospect of noise and fumes. W&A then located their terminus 6 miles to the WSW...and Atlanta was born.
So if not for our little city's delicate sensibilities, we would have been Atlanta.
Interesting post! I guess I wouldn't describe Decatur as a suburb, given its history. (don't want to start nuthin' here, tho!)
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Old 09-23-2008, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Chicago - The Miami of Canada
120 posts, read 226,225 times
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Red face Chicago = Stink Onion

Chicago was named after the gross smell that the river emitted. The native americans that lived there called the land "shikaakwa" which basically means wild leeks or stink-onions (yes, I'm serious)

It was built as a trading base on the shore of Lake Michigan after an Army Base on the site named Fort Dearborn was destoyed. Because of its location, it became a major trading post and transportation link between the Atlantic and Mississippi River, in addition to a major railroad hub. The population grew from under 30,000 to over 1 million in forty years. By 1900, Chicago was the fifth largest city in the world and the largest of the cities that didn't exist in 1800.

The city also became sustainable when engineers found a way to reverse the Chicago river's flow AWAY from the lake to stop poluting the fresh water source. However, this meant that Chicago's garbage would forever be transported to St. Louis and New Orleans.

Also, I've always heard that St. Louis was destined to the be the most important inland city, but then after the Great Chicago Fire in 1871 all the attention went to rebuilding Chicago. The city's population then exploded after the World's Columbian Exposition and the city became known as the Second City due to it's 2nd largest U.S. population behind NY AND the fact that it was literally the second city to live there.
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Old 09-23-2008, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Galewood
3,761 posts, read 8,700,421 times
Reputation: 2191
Default Jean Baptiste Du Sable

Quote:
Originally Posted by spaceboyzero View Post
Chicago was named after the gross smell that the river emitted. The native americans that lived there called the land "shikaakwa" which basically means wild leeks or stink-onions (yes, I'm serious)

It was built as a trading base on the shore of Lake Michigan after an Army Base on the site named Fort Dearborn was destoyed. Because of its location, it became a major trading post and transportation link between the Atlantic and Mississippi River, in addition to a major railroad hub. The population grew from under 30,000 to over 1 million in forty years. By 1900, Chicago was the fifth largest city in the world and the largest of the cities that didn't exist in 1800.

The city also became sustainable when engineers found a way to reverse the Chicago river's flow AWAY from the lake to stop poluting the fresh water source. However, this meant that Chicago's garbage would forever be transported to St. Louis and New Orleans.

Also, I've always heard that St. Louis was destined to the be the most important inland city, but then after the Great Chicago Fire in 1871 all the attention went to rebuilding Chicago. The city's population then exploded after the World's Columbian Exposition and the city became known as the Second City due to it's 2nd largest U.S. population behind NY AND the fact that it was literally the second city to live there.
Crazy you said all that, but don't mention Jean Baptiste Du Sable who is the 'father of Chicago' and its first known settler(1779). I'm sure someone with more time on their hands than I can elaborate a little more about a very important, yet unrecognized figure in Chicago.
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Old 09-23-2008, 02:11 PM
 
127 posts, read 400,331 times
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Default The Founding Father of Chicago!!!!!!!!!!

Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable is not known to many of Chicago's civilans. I wonder why? Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable was Black French man that hailed from Haiti traveled to the states with some french whitemen that needed him to guide them though midwestern part of the states. They started in the Louisiana area first making thier way toward the midwest. When they got to Illinois where they found some Native Americans in the territory which is now known as Chicago.He helped the Native Americans trade and sell their crops to other parts of the midwest and the rest of the country.Jean Baptiste had set up trading post on the land as he was abandoned by the french men who brought him along the journey. He became the first settler in Chicago in 1779, which makes him the founding father of my city.Jean Baptiste has a statue in the middle of the Water Tower(where the trading post was set up at)and a museum name after him in his honor, but no city holiday or street named after him??? I guess its another unsloved mystery. Back on the subject I just wanted to make this clear.
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Old 09-23-2008, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Chicago - The Miami of Canada
120 posts, read 226,225 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrChicago View Post
Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable is not known to many of Chicago's civilans. I wonder why? Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable was Black French man that hailed from Haiti traveled to the states with some french whitemen that needed him to guide them though midwestern part of the states. They started in the Louisiana area first making thier way toward the midwest. When they got to Illinois where they found some Native Americans in the territory which is now known as Chicago.He helped the Native Americans trade and sell their crops to other parts of the midwest and the rest of the country.Jean Baptiste had set up trading post on the land as he was abandoned by the french men who brought him along the journey. He became the first settler in Chicago in 1779, which makes him the founding father of my city.Jean Baptiste has a statue in the middle of the Water Tower(where the trading post was set up at)and a museum name after him in his honor, but no city holiday or street named after him??? I guess its another unsloved mystery. Back on the subject I just wanted to make this clear.
I can't believe I forgot to mention good ol' Jean Baptiste. I mean he even has a major building named after him on NIU's campus where I went to school too. He does seem to get forgotten...especially when Casmir Pulaski gets a day in Chicago over him.
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