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Old 11-02-2012, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,467,331 times
Reputation: 5401

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR View Post
valentro, Toronto is a Canadian city that's apart of the Great Lakes megaregion. Does that make Toronto a Midwestern city or better yet an American city?

Puerto Rico is apart of the US, those born there are Ethnically Puerto Ricans instead of Americans.

Vancouver is apart of a mega region with Seattle, called Cascadia. Does this now make Vancouver an American city?

Yes D.C. is connected by sprawl to the Northeast but it's both a Southern city and a BosWash city. Don't overlap BosWash to mean "Northeast", it's a dual regional mega region just like the other examples I mentioned. D.C.'s history started off in the south, being in the south is not a bad thing. It just is what it is. There are several nice cities in the south like Miami, Dallas, Houston, or Atlanta. There's nothing to be ashamed about, the culture and history of the south are as vast as its geography.
I know you go strictly by the Mason-Dixon line but seriously have you ever been Washington DC? Even you must agree that DC in modern times is more culturally connected to Northern cities than it is to southern cities like Atlanta or Houston. By the way "BoshWash" does pretty much equal northeast. Being a New Yorker you should have probably known that since your city is geographically located in the heart of it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis

Last edited by gwillyfromphilly; 11-02-2012 at 12:16 AM..
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Old 11-02-2012, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,467,331 times
Reputation: 5401
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I agree with both you and nephi on DC; it's 40 miles away from Baltimore, but the cultures are completely different.
To be fair couldn't you say the same thing about Philly and New York City(90 miles apart) and New York City and Boston(218 miles apart).
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Old 11-02-2012, 12:15 AM
 
Location: London, U.K.
886 posts, read 1,333,657 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Even you must agree
Nope.
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Old 11-02-2012, 12:58 AM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,596,301 times
Reputation: 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR View Post
Sneaky sneaky guy you are. Baltimore is more Irish and Italian than D.C. but it's more in line with its southeastern big brothers Miami and Atlanta.

There are only 8 Ivy League schools and none are in the south (MD, D.C., VA, FL, GA, TX, NC, SC, TN, OK, AR, MS, AL, KY) Ivy League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ivy League schools are historically tied to the northeast. They're our regions crown jewels because all Ivy Leagues are exclusively Northeastern. The first schools in the US and the most prestigious schools in all of the world.
I agree. Baltimore is not really Italian either which is one of the reasons why I don't see Baltimore as a northeastern city, but it also isn't southern imo. It's not a coincidence that in Philly, NYC and Boston, which are all true northeastern cities, Italian and Irish are the two largest white ethnic groups. Here is interesting comparison between the city propers of the four cities (percentages are of the total city population) selected 7 largest groups for each city. source city data

Philadelphia city

Irish - 206,582 (13.6%)
Italian - 140,139 (9.2%)

German - 123,058 (8.1%)
Polish - 65,508 (4.3%)
English - 44,513 (2.9%)
United States - 27,843 (1.8%)
Russian - 26,375 (1.7%)

Boston city

Irish - 93,360 (15.8%)
Italian - 49,017 (8.3%)

English - 26,384 (4.5%)
German - 24,426 (4.1%)
United States - 19,387 (3.3%)
Polish - 13,704 (2.3%)
French - 10,960 (1.9%)

New York city

Italian - 692,739 (8.7%)
Irish - 421,646 (5.3%)

German - 255,536 (3.2%)
Russian - 243,015 (3.0%)
United States - 238,385 (3.0%)
Polish - 213,447 (2.7%)
English - 124,821 (1.6%)

VS

Baltimore city

German - 48,423 (7.4%)
Irish - 39,045 (6.0%)
English - 21,015 (3.2%)
Italian - 18,492 (2.8%)
Polish - 18,400 (2.8%)
United States - 16,056 (2.5%)
Russian - 5,526 (0.8%)
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Old 11-02-2012, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
21 posts, read 73,105 times
Reputation: 21
It all depends on how you look at it without stereotypes of culture, and geographic location. For example southern California, Arizona, and New Mexico all are located at the south of the country, or perhaps kentucky is Midwest. Delaware and Baltimore are considered by most to be east coast. NC, SC and Florida are all technically eastcoast. Texas through Alabama or Georgia is in the middle of the county directly below the midwest so is it midwest?
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Old 11-02-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,952,730 times
Reputation: 13292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Savagedre313 View Post
It all depends on how you look at it without stereotypes of culture, and geographic location. For example southern California, Arizona, and New Mexico all are located at the south of the country, or perhaps kentucky is Midwest. Delaware and Baltimore are considered by most to be east coast. NC, SC and Florida are all technically eastcoast. Texas through Alabama or Georgia is in the middle of the county directly below the midwest so is it midwest?
Kentucky has two different cultures, both southern. From southern Kentucky to south of Louisville the culture is similar to that of the Mid-South. Eastern Kentucky has an upland Southern culture in the Appalachian region. The only area of Kentucky that is a bit more similar to the Midwest are the cluster of counties south of the Ohio River by Cincinnati.
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Old 11-02-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
21 posts, read 73,105 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Kentucky has two different cultures, both southern. From southern Kentucky to south of Louisville the culture is similar to that of the Mid-South. Eastern Kentucky has an upland Southern culture in the Appalachian region. The only area of Kentucky that is a bit more similar to the Midwest are the cluster of counties south of the Ohio River by Cincinnati.
The Midwest doesn't have a stereotypical or general culture/accent IMO
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Old 11-02-2012, 09:57 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,115,139 times
Reputation: 5742
Thanks for a civil and intelligent and courteous reply!

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenbay33 View Post
Sorry, my mistake. TExas is a confederate state. I guess though i've always felt that they were kind of just getting started.
Yes, in a sense (Texas) was just getting started. Which was likely why we (being very familiar with revolution and secession! LOL) were one of the original 7 Confederate States. Texas was a very "fire-eating" Southern state in that day, and the only reason it wasn't the 2nd or 3rd to seceed, was because Gov. Sam Houston (a Southern Unionist) refused to call the Texas Legislature into special secession to consider the question...knowing full well what the outcome would be. \\, . Because of Texas later day "cattle boom and cowboy" boom

Quote:
Anyways, I wouldn't group all of Texas with the South.
I wouldn't either... IF one considers the "southeast" and "South", synonymous. But I don't. And neither, with good, solid, reasons, do many others. "The South" is a "region" more defined by history/culture...and, I dare say, self-identification and even affection. And the vast majority of Texans (at least according to the most extensive ever done) consider themselves to live in the South and think of themselves as Southerners.

Quote:
San Antonio and Austin are the gateways to the Southwest.
No, they are "gateways" to the part of Texas best described as the "western South". That is, historically speaking, "Southwest" in the sense of where the Old South gets blended with the traits of the frontier West. In fact, San Antonio proudly touts itself as something like a combination of the "Old South and Old Mexico". Austin...welll...yeah, its demographics no longer make the case...

...but historically? Austin is very much a Southern city in its roots and attitudes, etc. What has happened recently is something akin to, in the eastern South, what has happened to Atlanta....

The main point is, none of the cities in the interior Southwest (Santa Fe, Albquerque,Tuscon, Phoenix, etc) share much at all with San Antonio or Austin terms of essential history and culture and shaping forces. They are just two different critters, two different "Southwests". One the "southern West, the other, the western South."...

Quote:
if anyone thinks a place like Amarillo or El Paso is Southern, your'e crazy. Texas is almost like 3 or 4 states in one in some ways.
LOL I'll give you El Paso for sure! Even though, even El Paso has a Confederate monument on its courthouse lawn and the area went for secession. But anyway, I think we would all agree that the trans-Pecos area is truly Southwestern. Amarillo? Hmmm. It is not without Southern roots and features...but I agree that the southern Midwest settlement patterns and make it somewhat of an anamoly in itself...
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Old 11-02-2012, 09:58 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,952,730 times
Reputation: 13292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Savagedre313 View Post
The Midwest doesn't have a stereotypical or general culture/accent IMO
Yes it does. Huge differences exist between the Upper Midwest and Lower Midwest.
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Old 11-03-2012, 11:33 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,115,139 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Thanks for a civil and intelligent and courteous reply!

Yes, in a sense (Texas) was just getting started. Which was likely why we (being very familiar with revolution and secession! LOL) were one of the original 7 Confederate States. Texas was a very "fire-eating" Southern state in that day, and the only reason it wasn't the 2nd or 3rd to seceed, was because Gov. Sam Houston (a Southern Unionist) refused to call the Texas Legislature into special secession to consider the question...knowing full well what the outcome would be. \\, . Because of Texas later day "cattle boom and cowboy" boom
I am a bit embarrased to quote myself, but I just wanted to do a little re-write on the bolded part, which I obviously did not fill out when I wrote the original post.

What I meant to say was that the "cattle and cowboy" boom era, was, Hollywood movie imagery aside (and I love those old western classic), was not truly indicitive of how most Texans lived. It was cotton, not cattle, that was truly king in Texas. Most Texans were small tenant cotton farmers, not ranchers or cowboys.
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