U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-22-2007, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,342,052 times
Reputation: 288

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
No, not sheltered. It just wasn't part of her experience. The fact is, there are virtually no black farmers in New England, or for that matter, much else of the North. If barbedwire is guilty of anything, it's not knowing the history of this country. All those blacks in northern cities came from Southern farms! And fairly recently, too. They began moving up north in relatively small numbers because of job opportunities during WWI. The pace picked up in WWII for the same reason. By the late 50s/early 60s, the bulk of the migration occurred. Prior to the 60s, most big Northern cities had huge white majoritites, while many rural counties in GA, AL , LA, SC and MS were overwhelmingly black.

barbedwire's statement: "There aren't any blacks I knew growing up." I think it's pretty sheltered not knowing someone of another race. I grew up in a town that is, as we speak, 95% white. But I went into the city quite often, there was forced bussing that integrated the schools, there was television...so I was familiar with other races besides my own.

I know about the migration of black Americans to the Northeast. I really began before the civil war, with slaves escaping and going North. It continued after the war, but only began to be really significant when they began emerging from poverty and had more means of transportation. This fact is the main reason for the northern/southern stereotypes; people in the north lived in homogeneous communities, so they didn't have anyone to be racist towards, while in the south there was lots of opportunities for racism in the overall climate of resentment towards black people. It still exists, but I don't see people in one place or the other being more racist. With all of the migration, it's spread pretty evenly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-22-2007, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,717,721 times
Reputation: 3505
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprtsluvr8 View Post
This fact is the main reason for the northern/southern stereotypes; people in the north lived in homogeneous communities, so they didn't have anyone to be racist towards, while in the south there was lots of opportunities for racism in the overall climate of resentment towards black people.
Toronto was almost exactly like that too before the 1960's.

However, my grandparents of Ukrainian decent had to seriously downplay or abandon their ancestral roots to fit in with most of the other kids, back in the 1930's. They didn't have strong Slavic-looking facial features or even Ukrainian accents and they used to be teased and mocked because their parents cooked with cabbage and garlic. There were probably many "white people" back then had trouble fitting in "white communities."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2007, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,342,052 times
Reputation: 288
Anyone different from the majority was often treated the way you described. Sometimes bullies feel a sense of power in being part of the majority and will use it to hurt others...and they love to pick out anyone with a different look or any characteristic that can be easily targeted. Adult bullies are the worst...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 12:27 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,053,448 times
Reputation: 3485
"This fact is the main reason for the northern/southern stereotypes; people in the north lived in homogeneous communities, so they didn't have anyone to be racist towards, while in the south there was lots of opportunities for racism in the overall climate of resentment towards black people."

Well, while the northern countryside was pretty homogenous, the cities were far from. People from tons of mostly European countries with their own languages, customs, cuisine. Throw in religion on top of that and you get all kinds of permutations: Rusian Jews, German Jews, Irish Catholics, German Lutherans, German Catholics, Italian Catholics, Greek Othodox, etc, etc.

All sorts of dicrimination too. Ever hear of the know-nothings? How bout the draft riots in NY and the "lager riot" in Chicago?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,342,052 times
Reputation: 288
Yes, I've heard of each one of those, and I saw The Gangs of New York...really good movie and it depicted the draft riots. But I thought the subject was black migration from the south to the northeast?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2007, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,431,043 times
Reputation: 1171
i think the dividing line between the north and the south is right around the southern part of Fairfax county(VA)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2007, 09:14 AM
 
2,356 posts, read 2,642,819 times
Reputation: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprtsluvr8 View Post
I always thought the regions of the U.S. were grouped by location, not by how alike and how different they are??? If a state is in the Northeast then it's in the Northeast, no matter how much it might seem a little midwestern. I mean, Florida is about as south as there is, so it seems strange not to include because of it's retiree popluation. Am I off base or is this regional question already decided by where the states are positioned?

I don't think anyone is saying that Florida isn't geographically southern. That's pretty obvious one. But every area has different social mores, accents, ethnicities, climate, topography, history.. etc., I mean you can classify things anyway you want. I think this is where you're missing the big picture.

For example, I consider Tallahassee, FL "the south", but I don't consider Miami, FL "the south".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2007, 09:17 AM
 
2,356 posts, read 2,642,819 times
Reputation: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprtsluvr8 View Post
People also say that Atlanta is not southern, I gather for similar reasons to Florida not being southern. Why are some areas like these referred to this way?
You're correct. Atlanta is similar to Florida in this way, because so many Atlantans weren't born and raised in the south. Again, "the south" is as much a cultural region as it is a geographic region.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2007, 09:27 AM
 
2,356 posts, read 2,642,819 times
Reputation: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYMTman View Post
OF COURSE Virginia is a Southern state. Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy! And even today the state still has a conservative, southern voting record. Plus they talk like Southerners.
I disagree. Washington DC has turned a large portion of Virginia into "the north". Anywhere north of Richmond, they don't have a conservative southern voting record, and they definitely don't talk like southerners. I went to school with some northern VA people, and they talk like they are from New Jersey.

You can make a case that Virginia is a "southern state", mainly b/c of it's history. But the demographics of it today are different than they were 250 years ago when it was undisputedly southern. I don't consider it southern, but I can see where someone would.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2007, 09:34 AM
 
2,356 posts, read 2,642,819 times
Reputation: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina_native View Post
I was enjoying readng these posts until I saw yours. Why did you say it anyways??

You hear alot of black people refer to each other using the 'n' word, does it make it right? I can certainly tell you that if you ever referred to me using that word or anyone else Ive ever known they would see it at the least as an insult.
Coming from South Carolina, i always thought the word 'cracker' was a racial slur. But eventually I learned that the word isn't really considered an insult in South Georgia and Florida. Sort of like the word 'coonass' in Louisiana, it can be used in a good or bad way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top