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View Poll Results: Can any U.S. city really compare to Los Angeles, California?
Yes 56 69.14%
No 25 30.86%
Voters: 81. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-11-2008, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Irvine,Oc,Ca
1,423 posts, read 4,232,154 times
Reputation: 671

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCop View Post
Chicago is underrated, Philly is underrated, Milan (Italy) is underrated... Los Angeles is overrated. Neighborhoods in their city look like neighborhoods in our suburbs.
You just Can't ever agree with anyone can you? Nyc is Overrated and yes even you know your city's Overrated.Then your gonna come back and say Nyc isn't Overrated.

 
Old 10-11-2008, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Irvine,Oc,Ca
1,423 posts, read 4,232,154 times
Reputation: 671
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCop View Post
And yet "city folks" in LA live in bungalows, not buildings. Nothing but a bunch of phonies if you ask me.
No we actually live in houses, We Actually have Backyards,Grass(that needs to be cut),A Drive through(that needs to be cleaned) and NYC'ers live in buildings.I Think L.A. wins in housing. You lose.
 
Old 10-11-2008, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Irvine,Oc,Ca
1,423 posts, read 4,232,154 times
Reputation: 671
Los Angeles has a long-standing reputation for sprawl; however, this reputation is undeserved. As of the 2000 Census, The "Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana" Urbanized Area had a population density of 7,068 inhabitants per square mile (2,729 /kmē), covering 1,668 square miles (4,320 km2) of land area, making it the most densely-populated Urbanized Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau) in the United States.[7] For comparison, the "New York-Newark" Urbanized Area as a whole had a population density of 5,309 per square mile (2,050 /kmē), covering 3,353 square miles (8,684 km2) of land area.

Nyc Metro has more Land than La's Metro and you guys are complaining were to Sprawled

L.A.'s Repuation of being Sprawl is Underserved.,For those who Keep on Saying La is a Sprawl Gridlock City.Now Houston is more spread out than L.A.

Houston:601.7 sq mi (1,558 kmē) 579.4 sq mi (1,501 kmē)

Los Angeles: 498.3 sq mi (1,290.6 kmē) 469.1 sq mi (1,214.9 kmē)

So i guess Houston Kind of compares with L.A.
Just for some Pride.
More recently, the state of California has led the nation in working to limit pollution by mandating low emission vehicles.

The economy of Los Angeles is driven by international trade, entertainment (television, motion pictures, recorded music), aerospace, technology, petroleum, fashion, apparel, and tourism. Los Angeles is also the largest manufacturing center in the United States.

The contiguous ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach together comprise the most significant port in North America. They are some of the most important ports in the world, and vital to trade within the Pacific Rim.[41] Other significant industries include media production, finance, telecommunications, law, health medicine, and transportation.



The Los Angeles area is rich in native plant species due in part to a diversity in habitats, including beaches, wetlands, and mountains. The most prevalent botanical environment is coastal sage scrub, which covers the hillsides in combustible chaparral. Native plants include: California poppy, matilija poppy, toyon, Coast Live Oak, and giant wild rye grass. Many of these native species, such as the Los Angeles sunflower, have become so rare as to be considered endangered. Though they are not native to the area, the official tree of Los Angeles is the tropical Coral Tree and the official flower of Los Angeles is the Bird of Paradise, Strelitzia reginae. Lakers Pride! Knicks Suck.Did i just say that i better watch out FC might come.



Kobes Home,


Last edited by californialove24; 10-11-2008 at 02:59 PM..
 
Old 10-11-2008, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA (Native)
289 posts, read 386,408 times
Reputation: 127
Los Angeles, hands down, is a very unique place in nearly every category.
 
Old 10-11-2008, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Irvine,Oc,Ca
1,423 posts, read 4,232,154 times
Reputation: 671
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilpainter View Post
Of the big cities in this country, Orange County's Little Saigon, Westminster (Los Angeles Metropolitan) has the largest Vietnamese pop. It is the largest, most important overseas Vietnamese location. As for new york being a 'primate' anything- Los Angeles effectively nips that possibility. New york can never reign over this country the way that, say.. Tokyo does over the rest of Japan- or Paris over France for that matter. Thanks to Los Angeles (..you're welcome.) New york does not have warmer and cleaner beaches. The arguments for FutureCop's 'industry' as they pertain to monetary output or square mileage has me scratching my head but I'll say this again: New york has to go into other states for a statistical lead over Los Angeles in population, while Los Angeles isn't allowed to count neighboring counties that are intrinsically as well as physically part of the metropolitan urban area. Los Angeles doesn't need other states like vulnerable new york does. thief..
Right on Ny metro passes the states Lines. And Nys metro has more Land area than L.A. Metro and they say were to Sprawling.

Last edited by californialove24; 10-11-2008 at 06:10 PM..
 
Old 10-11-2008, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Irvine,Oc,Ca
1,423 posts, read 4,232,154 times
Reputation: 671
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCop View Post
Chicago is underrated, Philly is underrated, Milan (Italy) is underrated... Los Angeles is overrated. Neighborhoods in their city look like neighborhoods in our suburbs.
How can you forget about your City. New York City is overrated to son, so go to sleep. Dam you said L.A. is overrated when Nyc is Clearly Overrated as well.How stupid of you not to put NYC in the Overrated list.Its because you Live in a Suburb of Ny.How pathetic You can't even admit NYC is Overrated.
 
Old 10-11-2008, 07:41 PM
 
Location: NYC
190 posts, read 830,744 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by californialove24 View Post
Tell them straight up.Don't let them take our pride away from us.im Proud to be an Angelino.
No one is taking your pride but he just stole my quote. Make your own.
 
Old 10-11-2008, 08:12 PM
 
Location: NYC
190 posts, read 830,744 times
Reputation: 51
California Love, since you want to start throwing links you started a city war.

http://nycvisit.com/video/ (broken link)
Quote:
The City of New York, most often called New York City, is the most populous city in the United States, in a metropolitan area that ranks among the world's most-populous urban areas. It is a leading global city, exerting a powerful influence over worldwide commerce, finance, culture, and entertainment. The city is also an important center for international affairs, hosting the United Nations headquarters.
Located on the Atlantic coast of the Northeastern United States, the city consists of five distinct boroughs: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island. It is the most densely populated major city in the United States, with an estimated 8,274,527 people[1] occupying just under 305 square miles (790 km2).[2][3][4][5][6] The New York metropolitan area's population is also the nation's highest, estimated at 19,750,000 people over 6,720 square miles (17,400 km2) in three states.[7]
New York is largely unique among American cities for its high use of mass transit, and the overall density and diversity of its population. In 2005, nearly 170 languages were spoken in the city and 36% of its population was born outside the United States.[8][9] The city is sometimes referred to as "The City That Never Sleeps" due to its extensive 24-hour subway system and constant bustling of traffic and people, while other nicknames include Gotham and the Big Apple.[10][11]
Founded as a commercial trading post by the Dutch in 1624, it served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790,[12] and has been the nation's largest city since 1790. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Wall Street, in Lower Manhattan, has been a dominant global financial center since World War II and is home to the New York Stock Exchange. Today, the city has many renowned landmarks and neighborhoods that are world famous. The city has been home to several of the tallest buildings in the world, including the Empire State Building and the twin towers of the former World Trade Center.
New York is the birthplace of many cultural movements, including the Harlem Renaissance in literature and visual art, abstract expressionism (also known as the New York School) in painting, and hip hop,[13] punk,[14] salsa, disco and Tin Pan Alley in music. It is also the home of Broadway theater.

Quote:
Mass transit use in New York City is the highest in United States and gasoline consumption in the city is at the rate the national average was in the 1920s.[45] New York City's high rate of transit use saved 1.8 billion gallons of oil in 2006; New York saves half of all the oil saved by transit nationwide.[46] The city's population density, low automobile use and high transit utility make it among the most energy efficient cities in the United States.[47] New York City's greenhouse gas emissions are 7.1 metric tons per person compared with the national average of 24.5.[48] New Yorkers are collectively responsible for one percent of the nation's total greenhouse gas emissions[48] though comprising 2.7% of the nation's population. The average New Yorker consumes less than half the electricity used by a resident of San Francisco and nearly one-quarter the electricity consumed by a resident of Dallas.[49]The city government is required to purchase only the most energy-efficient equipment for use in city offices and public housing.[51] New York has the largest clean air diesel-hybrid and compressed natural gas bus fleet in the country, and some of the first hybrid taxis.[52] The city government was a petitioner in the landmark Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency Supreme Court case forcing the EPA to regulate greenhouse gases as pollutants. The city is also a leader in the construction of energy-efficient green office buildings, including the Hearst Tower among others.[53]
New York City is supplied with drinking water by the protected Catskill Mountains watershed.[54] As a result of the watershed's integrity and undisturbed natural water filtration process, New York is one of only four major cities in the United States with drinking water pure enough not to require purification by water treatment plants.
Quote:
The city is also important in the American film industry. Manhatta (1920), an early avant-garde film, was filmed in the city.[77] Today, New York City is the second largest center for the film industry in the United States. The city has more than 2,000 arts and cultural organizations and more than 500 art galleries of all sizes.[78] The city government funds the arts with a larger annual budget than the National Endowment for the Arts.[78] Wealthy industrialists in the 19th century built a network of major cultural institutions, such as the famed Carnegie Hall and Metropolitan Museum of Art, that would become internationally established. The advent of electric lighting led to elaborate theatre productions, and in the 1880s New York City theaters on Broadway and along 42nd Street began showcasing a new stage form that came to be known as the Broadway musical.
Strongly influenced by the city's immigrants, productions such as those of Harrigan and Hart, George M. Cohan and others used song in narratives that often reflected themes of hope and ambition. Today these productions are a mainstay of the New York theatre scene. The city's 39 largest theatres (with more than 500 seats) are collectively known as "Broadway," after the major thoroughfare that crosses the Times Square theatre district.[79] This area is sometimes referred to as The Main Stem, The Great White Way or The Realto.
The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, which includes Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Opera, the New York Philharmonic, the New York City Ballet, the Vivian Beaumont Theatre, the Juilliard School and Alice Tully Hall, is the largest performing arts center in the United States. Central Park SummerStage presents performances of free plays and music in Central Park and 1,200 free concerts, dance, and theater events across all five boroughs in the summer months.[80]
New York City is considered by many to be the heart of stand-up comedy in the United States

Quote:
New York is a global center for the television, advertising, music, newspaper and book publishing industries and is also the largest media market in North America (followed by Los Angeles, Chicago, and Toronto).[86] Some of the city's media conglomerates include Time Warner, the News Corporation, the Hearst Corporation, and Viacom. Seven of the world's top eight global advertising agency networks are headquartered in New York.[87] Three of the "Big Four" record labels are also based in the city, as well as in Los Angeles. One-third of all American independent films are produced in New York.[88] More than 200 newspapers and 350 consumer magazines have an office in the city[88] and the book-publishing industry employs about 25,000 people.[89]
Two of the three national daily newspapers in the United States are New York papers: The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Major tabloid newspapers in the city include The New York Daily News and The New York Post, founded in 1801 by Alexander Hamilton. The city also has a major ethnic press, with 270 newspapers and magazines published in more than 40 languages.[90] El Diario La Prensa is New York's largest Spanish-language daily and the oldest in the nation.[91] The New York Amsterdam News, published in Harlem, is a prominent African American newspaper. The Village Voice is the largest alternative newspaper.
The television industry developed in New York and is a significant employer in the city's economy. The four major American broadcast networks, ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC, are all headquartered in New York. Many cable channels are based in the city as well, including MTV, Fox News, HBO and Comedy Central. In 2005, there were more than 100 television shows taped in New York City.[92]
New York is also a major center for non-commercial media. The oldest public-access television channel in the United States is the Manhattan Neighborhood Network, founded in 1971.[93] WNET is the city's major public television station and a primary provider of national PBS programming. WNYC, a public radio station owned by the city until 1997, has the largest public radio audience in the United States.[94] The City of New York operates a public broadcast service, nyctv, that produces several original Emmy Award-winning shows covering music and culture in city neighborhoods, as well as city government.
Quote:
The demographics of New York City depict a uniquely large and ethnically diverse metropolis, the largest city in the United States, with a population defined by a long history of international immigration. New York City is home to more than 8 million people, accounting for about 40% of the population of New York State and a similar percentage of the New York metropolitan area, home to about 20 million. Over the last decade the city has been growing faster than the region. Demographers estimate New York's population will reach 9.1 million by 2030.
Throughout its history New York City has been a major point of entry for immigrants; the term "melting pot" was first coined to describe densely populated immigrant neighborhoods on the Lower East Side. In 2005, nearly 170 languages were spoken in the city and 36% of its population was foreign born

Quote:
Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. The city's public school system, the New York City Department of Education, is the largest in the United States, and New York is home to some of the most important libraries, universities, and research centers in the world. The city is particularly known as a global center for research in medicine and the life sciences.New York has the most post-graduate life sciences degrees awarded annually in the United States, 40,000 licensed physicians, and 127 Nobel laureates with roots in local institutions.[1] The city receives the second-highest amount of annual funding from the National Institutes of Health among all U.S. cities.[2] It also struggles with disparity in its public school system, with some of the best and worst performing public schools in the United States. Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg the city has embarked on a major school reform effort.
The New York Public Library, which has the largest collection of any public library system in the country, serves Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island.[3] Queens is served by the Queens Borough Public Library, the nation's second largest public library system, and Brooklyn Public Library serves Brooklyn.[3] The New York Public Library has several research libraries, including the Main Branch and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.


Quote:
New York City is a global hub of international business and commerce and is one of three "command centers" for the world economy (along with London and Tokyo).[100] The city is a major center for finance, insurance, real estate, media and the arts in the United States. The New York metropolitan area had an estimated gross metropolitan product of $1.13 trillion in 2005,[101][102] the largest regional economy in the United States and second largest city economy in the world.[103] The metropolitan area's economy accounts for the majority of the economic activity in the states of New York and New Jersey. Many major corporations are headquartered in New York City, including 44 Fortune 500 companies.[104] New York is also unique among American cities for its large number of foreign corporations. One out of ten private sector jobs in the city is with a foreign company.[105]


Quote:
Public transit is overwhelmingly the dominant form of travel for New Yorkers.[154] About one in every three users of mass transit in the United States and two-thirds of the nation's rail riders live in New York and its suburbs.[155][156] This is in contrast to the rest of the country, where about 90% of commuters drive automobiles to their workplace.[154] New York is the only city in the United States where more than half of all households do not own a car (in Manhattan, more than 75% of residents do not own a car; nationally, the percentage is 8%).[154] According to the US Census Bureau, New York City residents spend an average of 38.4 minutes per day getting to work, the longest commute time in the nation among large cities.[157]
New York City is served by Amtrak, which uses Pennsylvania Station. Amtrak provides connections to Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.
The New York City Subway is the largest rapid transit system in the world when measured by the number of stations in operation, with 468. It is the third-largest when measured by annual ridership (1.5 billion passenger trips in 2006).[155] New York's subway is also notable because nearly all of the system remains open 24 hours per day (though in some cases with significant differences in routings from the daytime network), in contrast to the overnight shutdown common to systems in most cities, including London, Paris, Washington, DC, Madrid and Tokyo. The transportation system in New York City is extensive and complex. It includes the longest suspension bridge in North America,[158] the world's first mechanically ventilated vehicular tunnel,[159] more than 12,000 yellow cabs,[160] an aerial tramway that transports commuters between Roosevelt Island and Manhattan, and a ferry system connecting Manhattan to various locales within and outside the city. The busiest ferry in the United States is the Staten Island Ferry, which annually carries over 19 million passengers on the 5.2 mile (8.4 km) run between Staten Island and Lower Manhattan.
New York City's public bus fleet and commuter rail network are the largest in North America.[155] The rail network, which connects the suburbs in the tri-state region to the city, has more than 250 stations and 20 rail lines.[155][161][162] The commuter rail system converges at Grand Central Terminal and Pennsylvania Station.
New York City is the top international air passenger gateway to the United States.[163] The area is served by three major airports, John F. Kennedy International, Newark Liberty International and LaGuardia, with plans for a fourth airport, Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, NY, to be taken over and enlarged by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (which administers the other three airports), as a "reliever" airport to help cope with increasing passenger volume. 100 million travelers used the three airports in 2005 and the city's airspace is the busiest in the nation.[164] Outbound international travel from JFK and Newark accounted for about a quarter of all U.S. travelers who went overseas in 2004
New York's high rate of public transit use, 120,000 daily cyclists[166] and many pedestrian commuters makes it the most energy-efficient major city in the United States.[45] Walk and bicycle modes of travel account for 21% of all modes for trips in the city; nationally the rate for metro regions is about 8%.[167]To complement New York's vast mass transit network, the city also has an extensive web of expressways and parkways, that link New York City to northern New Jersey, Westchester County, Long Island, and southwest Connecticut through various bridges and tunnels. Because these highways serve millions of suburban residents who commute into New York, it is quite common for motorists to be stranded for hours in traffic jams that are a daily occurrence, particularly during rush hour. The George Washington Bridge is considered one of the world's busiest bridges in terms of vehicle traffic.[168]
Despite New York's reliance on public transit, roads are a defining feature of the city. Manhattan's street grid plan greatly influenced the city's physical development. Several of the city's streets and avenues, like Broadway, Wall Street and Madison Avenue are also used as shorthand in the American vernacular for national industries located there: the theater, finance, and advertising organizations, respectively.
Info provided by New York City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by CityPolice; 10-11-2008 at 09:23 PM..
 
Old 10-11-2008, 09:26 PM
 
Location: NYC
190 posts, read 830,744 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by californialove24 View Post
No we actually live in houses, We Actually have Backyards,Grass(that needs to be cut),A Drive through(that needs to be cleaned) and NYC'ers live in buildings.I Think L.A. wins in housing. You lose.
NYC also has brownstones (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownstone), townhouses, lofts, row houses, mansions, and plain old houses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archite..._New_York_City
 
Old 10-11-2008, 09:51 PM
 
356 posts, read 1,153,908 times
Reputation: 219
Default What a joke....

that statement about Atlanta being the new L.A. Anyone and who really knows and have lived and experienced Los Angeles and its DIVERSITY and all that it has to offer, from Malibu to Long Beach, Palos Verdes to Pasadena knows that Atlanta is NO COMPARISON to the Greater Los Angeles. Celebrities in Atlanta? LOL! OK Tyler, Ludacris, Bow Wow, UHHH Keisha Cole...please. These "celebrities" don't hold a candle to the huge mega stars you see in L.A. But that really has nothing to do with it. Los Angeles has a wealth of diverse people, activities, a progressive mindset that Atlanta will never have. It is still one of the most backward places where err one wants to know "what church you belong to." PLEASE! There is only one Los Angeles with all of its problems it still is a one of a kind place!
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
Atlanta is said to be the new L.A. of the South. Both cities sprawl, have big freeways, smog, traffic, and crime. Both cities also have a lot of celebrities living in them, and their downtown skylines look similar, plus how they have multiple skylines and urban neighborhoods.
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