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Old 10-05-2008, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,069,277 times
Reputation: 9577

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Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
I don't see how that makes Houston any different from other cities. When i was in New York City I went to a mall in Manhattan. It was across the street from Central Park. So apparently sun-belt cities are not the only ones with malls within the city limits and it doesn't prove that Houston is suburban territory outside the loop. Uptown Houston is outside the loop and it is very urban. Greenspoint, Sharpstown, and Westchase are outside the loop and they are very urban. When I think of the suburbs i think of The Woodlands, Sugarland, Katy, and Pearland. They are definitely not in the city limits but those places are where the malls are at (at least the thriving ones). The Galleria mall in Uptown reminded me alot of the mall I went to in Manhattan.
there is NOTHING urban about Greenspoint or Sharpstown. That is the epitome of suburban environment. Everything out in those areas are built around the car. Large parking lots, big box stores, wide streets, terrible pedestrian areas, little mass transit, strip malls a plenty, hardly anything built for human scale in those areas. People that live in urban areas would laugh at the notion of Sharpstown and Greenspoint being urban communities. Same thing with Uptown-Galleria. While they are making great strides to improve it's urbanity. It's still very unwelcome to pedestrians, there are still big box stores with large parking lots.

Also, are you talking about the Manhattan Mall? Because yeah, it is like the Galleria inside. But it doesn't have those ugly parking lots surrounding it with fast food chains and furniture stores dotted on the outskirts of the mall like you see at the galleria. But most of outer loop is suburban. There isn't any discussion that's needed for that. It is very much suburban in nature. The real Houston is the inner loop+galleria.
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Old 10-05-2008, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Houston
6,867 posts, read 12,813,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
there is NOTHING urban about Greenspoint or Sharpstown. That is the epitome of suburban environment. Everything out in those areas are built around the car. Large parking lots, big box stores, wide streets, terrible pedestrian areas, little mass transit, strip malls a plenty, hardly anything built for human scale in those areas. People that live in urban areas would laugh at the notion of Sharpstown and Greenspoint being urban communities. Same thing with Uptown-Galleria. While they are making great strides to improve it's urbanity. It's still very unwelcome to pedestrians, there are still big box stores with large parking lots.

Also, are you talking about the Manhattan Mall? Because yeah, it is like the Galleria inside. But it doesn't have those ugly parking lots surrounding it with fast food chains and furniture stores dotted on the outskirts of the mall like you see at the galleria. But most of outer loop is suburban. There isn't any discussion that's needed for that. It is very much suburban in nature. The real Houston is the inner loop+galleria.
I have to disagree with you completely. Sharpstown and Greenspoint might have been suburban 50 years ago but today it is an urban jungle. You don't reach the suburbs until you get to Spring headed north and you don't reach the suburbs until you get to Sugarland headed southwest. I live uptown so i know what's surrounding the mall and it's certainly not fast food chains. The nearest fast food would be Chick fil a which is a few blocks down Post Oak and Mcdonald's which is several blocks away and then you have the fast food at least a mile away from the Galleria on Westhiemer headed west. There isn't a fast food place in sight around the Galleria. If there is one area of Houston that i know well, it is Uptown. Also what ugly parking lots are you talking about? there is one big parking lot which is in front of Dillards but the rest of the parking is in parking garages.

You spend so much time dumping on Houston and I'm not sure why. Did you hate it that much when you lived here? I guess you just didn't take advantage of what the city has to offer the way I do. I love it here and I can't think of a better place i'd rather live.
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Old 10-05-2008, 10:48 PM
 
11,883 posts, read 32,924,797 times
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It's funny how this thread has devolved into a discussion of what cities have the best MALLS. It's entirely possible (and to me, preferable) to have a great shopping experience without ever setting foot inside a mall.

I mean, let's face it, a mall in Dallas has pretty much the same stores and the same food court as a mall in Atlanta or Denver or Seattle. Even the anchor stores carry pretty much the same styles of clothing, the same brands of perfume, the same luggage, etc.

Even though I live in a city that loves malls and power centers, I much prefer shopping in places like NYC or Chicago. Or, my favorites, Paris and Hong Kong (although HK has malls that are bigger than many American cities, it's still got a gazillion street-level shops).

And the best dining options? No question about it, it would have to be NYC, Chicago, New Orleans, San Francisco, maybe even Miami and Boston. But if your idea of "good dining options" is the number of Applebees, Chilis and Olive Gardens, then yeah I guess faux trendy places like Dallas, Atlanta, Houston, et al, would be good options.
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Old 10-06-2008, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,069,277 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
I have to disagree with you completely. Sharpstown and Greenspoint might have been suburban 50 years ago but today it is an urban jungle. You don't reach the suburbs until you get to Spring headed north and you don't reach the suburbs until you get to Sugarland headed southwest. I live uptown so i know what's surrounding the mall and it's certainly not fast food chains.

You spend so much time dumping on Houston and I'm not sure why. Did you hate it that much when you lived here? I guess you just didn't take advantage of what the city has to offer the way I do. I love it here and I can't think of a better place i'd rather live.
1. No way is Sharptstown or Greenspoint an urban jungle. You want an urban jungle? Try Georgetown in DC or Lincoln Park in Chicago. Try ANY hood in New York City or San Francisco. Heck, try Montrose or Rice area in Houston. That is much more urban than those Sharpstown or Greenspoint. Sharpstown and Greenspoint aren't in any way urban. Just because you see alot of cars driving down there does not make it urban.

2. You can find quotes where I said I like Houston and I could easily live there. You CANNOT however on this forum find any quotes that state that I dislike Houston. I have stuck up for Houston all the time on these boards. I've stated the pros and cons about Houston and one of the cons is exactly what we are talking about and unfortunately that is urbanity. It's not the most urban of cities because of it's low density, it's appreciation of big box stores and strip malls, and it's underdeveloped mass transit system for a city it's size. But do not think I am always dumping on the city because that is truly not the case.
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Old 10-06-2008, 03:36 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,069,277 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
It's funny how this thread has devolved into a discussion of what cities have the best MALLS. It's entirely possible (and to me, preferable) to have a great shopping experience without ever setting foot inside a mall.

I mean, let's face it, a mall in Dallas has pretty much the same stores and the same food court as a mall in Atlanta or Denver or Seattle. Even the anchor stores carry pretty much the same styles of clothing, the same brands of perfume, the same luggage, etc.

Even though I live in a city that loves malls and power centers, I much prefer shopping in places like NYC or Chicago. Or, my favorites, Paris and Hong Kong (although HK has malls that are bigger than many American cities, it's still got a gazillion street-level shops).

And the best dining options? No question about it, it would have to be NYC, Chicago, New Orleans, San Francisco, maybe even Miami and Boston. But if your idea of "good dining options" is the number of Applebees, Chilis and Olive Gardens, then yeah I guess faux trendy places like Dallas, Atlanta, Houston, et al, would be good options.
I 100% agree. I do think Houston is very authentic in it's restaurants though and belongs in the list with the maybes. But I agree with you.
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Old 10-06-2008, 04:26 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,455,026 times
Reputation: 1942
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
It's funny how this thread has devolved into a discussion of what cities have the best MALLS. It's entirely possible (and to me, preferable) to have a great shopping experience without ever setting foot inside a mall.

I mean, let's face it, a mall in Dallas has pretty much the same stores and the same food court as a mall in Atlanta or Denver or Seattle. Even the anchor stores carry pretty much the same styles of clothing, the same brands of perfume, the same luggage, etc.

Even though I live in a city that loves malls and power centers, I much prefer shopping in places like NYC or Chicago. Or, my favorites, Paris and Hong Kong (although HK has malls that are bigger than many American cities, it's still got a gazillion street-level shops).

And the best dining options? No question about it, it would have to be NYC, Chicago, New Orleans, San Francisco, maybe even Miami and Boston. But if your idea of "good dining options" is the number of Applebees, Chilis and Olive Gardens, then yeah I guess faux trendy places like Dallas, Atlanta, Houston, et al, would be good options.
America's Best Restaurant Cities - ForbesTraveler.com

And the question was about the major metro with the LEAST shopping and dining options, which so far only a couple of people have answered.
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Old 10-06-2008, 06:26 AM
 
11,883 posts, read 32,924,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
America's Best Restaurant Cities - ForbesTraveler.com (http://www.forbestraveler.com/food-drink/restaurant-cities-story.html - broken link)

And the question was about the major metro with the LEAST shopping and dining options, which so far only a couple of people have answered.
That's very true. However, the OP did open up that can of worms when s/he said that Dallas has the best shopping.

In my experience, Salt Lake City has to have the worst shopping for a major city. Part of it is because of the traditional frugality of Mormons which kept many national retailers away and which limited the amount of high-end shopping that most big cities have. Park City is an obvious exception. But considering there are 2 million people living along the Wasatch Front, there's not much there in terms of shopping and good dining.

Since I'm not a shopoholic nor a bon vivant, I really couldn't care less, and SLC certainly has enough stores and restaurants for my needs. But compared to other areas that size it's pretty paltry.
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Old 10-06-2008, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,687,715 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
It's funny how this thread has devolved into a discussion of what cities have the best MALLS. It's entirely possible (and to me, preferable) to have a great shopping experience without ever setting foot inside a mall.

I mean, let's face it, a mall in Dallas has pretty much the same stores and the same food court as a mall in Atlanta or Denver or Seattle. Even the anchor stores carry pretty much the same styles of clothing, the same brands of perfume, the same luggage, etc.

Even though I live in a city that loves malls and power centers, I much prefer shopping in places like NYC or Chicago. Or, my favorites, Paris and Hong Kong (although HK has malls that are bigger than many American cities, it's still got a gazillion street-level shops).


And the best dining options? No question about it, it would have to be NYC, Chicago, New Orleans, San Francisco, maybe even Miami and Boston. But if your idea of "good dining options" is the number of Applebees, Chilis and Olive Gardens, then yeah I guess faux trendy places like Dallas, Atlanta, Houston, et al, would be good options.
Actually your very wrong, Dallas has more stores than Atlanta,Denver and Seattle. Maybe you should research before you make statements like that.
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Old 10-06-2008, 11:08 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,053,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
Have you ever been to Houston?? There are no malls within the inner loop. There are shopping districts, but no malls.
We weren't talking about freeway loops, we were talking about city limits.
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Old 10-06-2008, 11:10 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,053,448 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Have you ever traveled to the Sunbelt?? We have malls and shopping districts within our city limits.
I know!! Please go back and re-read my post and the one I was responding to!
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