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Old 03-16-2009, 09:00 PM
 
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Man, we debated the hell out of question #1. So when do we start on question #2?
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Old 03-17-2009, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
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Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
Half of the Ozarks are in Missouri, and the western parts are in Oklahoma. Arkansas has the highest sections, though.

The Mississippi Delta of eastern Arkansas, much of Louisiana, and the extreme southeastern part of Missouri is the flattest country I've ever seen. It's pancake flat, not rolling hills flat. You have to see it and experience it to know how flat it truly is. There is a string of very small hills in eastern Arkansas called Crowley's Ridge, which is generally considered a separate geographical formation.
Most of Kansas is downright mountainous by comparison.
I've heard the Red River region along the North Dakota/Minnesota border is the same way.
Yes, the Red river region that straddles the North Dakota/Minnesota border is extremely flat. Even going west on I94 from Fargo, the area stays flat for at least 50 miles. It's that way from the South Dakota border to Canada along I29.
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Old 03-17-2009, 12:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
Yes, the Red river region that straddles the North Dakota/Minnesota border is extremely flat. Even going west on I94 from Fargo, the area stays flat for at least 50 miles. It's that way from the South Dakota border to Canada along I29.
And that's why when the Red River floods, it affects areas not just along the river, but for miles in every direction. They are predicting a flood up there this Spring.
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