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Old 10-06-2008, 08:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Crime rates will likely change significantly in next 2-3 yrs w/a worsening economy and decreased tax revenues, meaning cities will cut back police forces....and, I suspect, affluent, well-guarded suburbs will be preferred by many over upscale urban settings...

Part of why many affluent in LA prefer BeverlyHills over rest of Westside is added layer of protection of a well-guarded, capitalist town, when instability like early '90s LA riots recurs....

Part of why many prefer to live in Orinda, etc, not Piedmont, is to have a mountain protecting them from the instability of the Oakland 80/880 crime corridor....

PaloAlto is one of least safe affluent suburbs in US....affluent areas of SF (a socialist town w/keystone cops), like PacificHts, arguably have fewer brazen daytime/evening robberies/assaults than PA....PA is, like SF, simply a favored socialist suburb of SiliconValley for "Prius-driving/Gulfstream-flying socialists"....

Over past 5yrs, many of the super-affluent of Atherton have already moved/are moving to newly-built estates in Woodside to move further from the 101 crime corridor....

Common sense suggests proximity to poverty is always risky, esp w/o a vigilant, aggressive local police dept (funded by affluent, local taxpayers) that "screens" out those who have no legitimate reason to be driving/walking around the area....

Most affluent prefer to live in areas where law-abiding, major taxpayers are protected from harm....many in slums don't pay taxes anyway...
because you to factor in the gas issue too. People want to be able to get around efficiently. I think you might see the opposite and have people move back to cities due to this. That in turn could make cities become safer due to people coming from areas were safety was important having a say in what occurs in their neighborhoods. Think about why many cities are being gentrified too. That's already happening in major cities and I wouldn't be surprised that in 20-30 years we're looking more like Europe where the poor and ghettos are outside of city limits and the city is more affluent or has more economic balance. In my city, they are doing it to some of the poorest neighborhoods and emptying out some of the lower income housing in the city, with help from the major private University, the state University Hospital and a housing initiative. They say they aren't trying to push the people that already live in these neighborhoods out, but a lot of times, that's not the case.
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Old 10-06-2008, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,446 posts, read 23,941,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
because you to factor in the gas issue too. People want to be able to get around efficiently. I think you might see the opposite and have people move back to cities due to this. That in turn could make cities become safer due to people coming from areas were safety was important having a say in what occurs in their neighborhoods. Think about why many cities are being gentrified too. That's already happening in major cities and I wouldn't be surprised that in 20-30 years we're looking more like Europe where the poor and ghettos are outside of city limits and the city is more affluent or has more economic balance. In my city, they are doing it to some of the poorest neighborhoods and emptying out some of the lower income housing in the city, with help from the major private University, the state University Hospital and a housing initiative. They say they aren't trying to push the people that already live in these neighborhoods out, but a lot of times, that's not the case.
I tend to agree. With gas prices being as high as they are, and future world events and peak oil making things worse, cities are going to seem much more desirable whereas the outer suburbs in particular are going to be in for some really hard times. The Antelope Valley and Inland Empire in Southern California are already becoming like the equivalent of the French suburbs, and Fairfield in Northern California is headed that way....

Re: HSW's post, ALL of the independent cities on LA's Westside were not affected by rioting, not just Beverly Hills. Santa Monica and Culver City didn't see any rioting, either.
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Old 10-06-2008, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,515 posts, read 17,674,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
i dont know that any city on the coast is 100% evil
probably 3 worst areas i know are
hunters point and 3rd ward and pink palace in san francisco.
Compton is still pretty bad.
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Old 10-07-2008, 10:49 PM
 
3,536 posts, read 5,211,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
I tend to agree. With gas prices being as high as they are, and future world events and peak oil making things worse, cities are going to seem much more desirable whereas the outer suburbs in particular are going to be in for some really hard times. The Antelope Valley and Inland Empire in Southern California are already becoming like the equivalent of the French suburbs, and Fairfield in Northern California is headed that way....

Re: HSW's post, ALL of the independent cities on LA's Westside were not affected by rioting, not just Beverly Hills. Santa Monica and Culver City didn't see any rioting, either.
This is why the Inland Empire and Central Valley continue to be America's two top growing areas? Jobs are headed out east, negating your point. So unless we all have 500-600k to spend for houses (which not too many people do), many still go inland for affordable housing and commute coastal. Later, jobs follow...which is what started to occur prior to the meltdown. Plus the Inland Region ranks average in crime consistently...along with the Antelope Valley.
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Old 10-07-2008, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
7,731 posts, read 12,188,103 times
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South and East Los Angeles.
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Old 10-08-2008, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,710,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by that1guy View Post
This is why the Inland Empire and Central Valley continue to be America's two top growing areas? Jobs are headed out east, negating your point. So unless we all have 500-600k to spend for houses (which not too many people do), many still go inland for affordable housing and commute coastal. Later, jobs follow...which is what started to occur prior to the meltdown. Plus the Inland Region ranks average in crime consistently...along with the Antelope Valley.
Jobs are NOT moving into the Inland Empire and certainly NOT into the Central valley (which has some of the highest unemployment rates in the nation, btw). That's what this whole debate was about:
What is the "INLAND EMPIRE" all about?
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Old 10-08-2008, 10:35 AM
 
3,536 posts, read 5,211,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Jobs are NOT moving into the Inland Empire and certainly NOT into the Central valley (which has some of the highest unemployment rates in the nation, btw). That's what this whole debate was about:
What is the "INLAND EMPIRE" all about?

I was there...and yeah the JOBS ARE MOVING!!! Maybe not in the great exodus of Moses fashion, but nonetheless it's FACT that they are. BTW, unemployment rates are rising in all areas. It's about 9% in the IE and around 8% in LA. This is why 45% of industrial construction in SoCal was in the IE. Or why the IE had the lowest office vacancy rate. I did say that high paying jobs are still low and not moving at the rate that they should. But jobs were coming out here, prior to the meltdown.
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Old 10-09-2008, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
1,576 posts, read 5,135,417 times
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Compton
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Old 10-10-2008, 01:26 PM
 
18 posts, read 117,095 times
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alot of folks on here are not talking based on personal experience, take this from someone who has lived in various of these california city's & can assure that these are with out a doubt the toughest california has to offer in terms of murder rates, poverty and crime in no real order.

Richmond~
Watts~
San Bernardino~
compton~
Oakland~(east oakland)
hunters point SF~

those are the worst of the worst california has. point blank nothing else comes close. all of these have been on the most dangerous nationwide list & have recorded high murder rates in their histories... the areas with the worst poverty, blight and "slums" on that list are north richmond, watts and san bernadino.
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,283,883 times
Reputation: 3827
Its interesting that when discussing dangerous cities, no one mentions the risk of death/injury due to automobile accidents. Although death by homicide seems scarier, when you're dead in an auto accident, you're just as equally dead. In many/most cases, your risk of injury/death by MVA is significantly higher than your risk of being an innocent bystander victim of homicide even in the worst of neighborhoods. (Unless you're a gangbanger or drug dealer, that is.)

In fact, exurban areas of the country can have higher fatality rates due to MVA than inner city homicide rates (when you only take into account stranger-on-stranger murder.)

Contrary to popular belief, exurbs more dangerous than cities
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