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Old 12-18-2008, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,947,519 times
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I overheard someone today calling Cincinatti a "city without a soul". Have any of you heard that before?
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Old 12-18-2008, 08:53 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,205,020 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
I overheard someone today calling Cincinatti a "city without a soul". Have any of you heard that before?
I've heard that term applied to a number of cities, but this is the first I've heard of Cincinnati. "Cities without a soul"...I know what is meant by that, but don't most cities have a soul? How is that concept derived?
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Old 12-18-2008, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,703,212 times
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All cities have a soul, like every person has a personality.
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Old 12-18-2008, 11:59 PM
 
160 posts, read 466,449 times
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1. Chicago
2. St. Louis
3. Minneapolis
4. Detroit
5. Cincinnati
6. Cleveland
7. Kansas City
8. Milwaukee
9. Indianapolis
10. Columbus
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Old 12-19-2008, 12:14 AM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,755,794 times
Reputation: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Ne View Post
All cities have a soul, like every person has a personality.
..but some people have very blase personalities, or multiple personalities, or abrasive personalities.
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Old 12-19-2008, 05:31 AM
 
767 posts, read 1,827,486 times
Reputation: 508
Default City Without a Soul

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
..but some people have very blase personalities, or multiple personalities, or abrasive personalities.
I don't know what it is like now. But Cincinnati used to be referred to as "CENSORnatti" because it was so conservative and had outlawed or otherwise condemned so many things. Having said that Jerry Springer was once mayor....go figure....
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Old 12-19-2008, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Missouri
6,047 posts, read 21,646,034 times
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I haven't been to all or even half of those cities, but I've really enjoyed the ones I've visited:
1. St. Louis
2. Kansas City
3. Cincinnatti
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Old 12-19-2008, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,703,212 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
..but some people have very blase personalities, or multiple personalities, or abrasive personalities.
Same with cities, like Chicago, the south side, the suburbs and Downtown are all completely different, Detroit could be abrasive but it also has a nice side, and many cities have Blase personalities.
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Old 12-19-2008, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Downtown Omaha
1,362 posts, read 4,199,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I consider KC and Omaha to be Plains cities.
I have lived in Omaha/Nebraska all my life and never ever EVER heard that we weren't in the Midwest until I came on these forums. Great plains is a more a term for the physical terrain. The South is not all plantations (Smoky mountains) and the West Coast is not all beaches (Bakersfield, Spokane)

I would say the Midwests western border starts at Colorado/Wyoming borders when you start getting into the the west.
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Old 12-19-2008, 11:51 AM
 
767 posts, read 1,827,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
I have lived in Omaha/Nebraska all my life and never ever EVER heard that we weren't in the Midwest until I came on these forums. Great plains is a more a term for the physical terrain. The South is not all plantations (Smoky mountains) and the West Coast is not all beaches (Bakersfield, Spokane)

I would say the Midwests western border starts at Colorado/Wyoming borders when you start getting into the the west.

I agree with your comment. I think that Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Kansas are typically all considered midwest, but Colorado and Wyoming are considered more western or al least "Rocky Mountain" states. To the east, I think most people would probably say that the Midwest extends eastward to about the the OH/PA border and extends south to the Ohio River.
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