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Old 12-19-2008, 01:34 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,911,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Central Illinois 1 View Post
I agree with your comment. I think that Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Kansas are typically all considered midwest, but Colorado and Wyoming are considered more western or al least "Rocky Mountain" states. To the east, I think most people would probably say that the Midwest extends eastward to about the the OH/PA border and extends south to the Ohio River.
I'd also say that the Midwest would arguably cover most of Southern Missouri to about the latitude that the Mississippi intersects the Ohio River. From my journeys around the state personally I think that it is fairly accurate to say that.
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Old 12-19-2008, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Downtown Omaha
1,362 posts, read 4,202,133 times
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No matter how you slice it Missouri is Midwestern.
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I'd also say that the Midwest would arguably cover most of Southern Missouri to about the latitude that the Mississippi intersects the Ohio River. From my journeys around the state personally I think that it is fairly accurate to say that.

I agree completely.
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Old 12-20-2008, 03:11 PM
 
Location: IN
20,857 posts, read 35,987,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
I have lived in Omaha/Nebraska all my life and never ever EVER heard that we weren't in the Midwest until I came on these forums. Great plains is a more a term for the physical terrain. The South is not all plantations (Smoky mountains) and the West Coast is not all beaches (Bakersfield, Spokane)

I would say the Midwests western border starts at Colorado/Wyoming borders when you start getting into the the west.
The Great Plains is a sub-region of the Midwest, but MUCH different. You can't really say that a city like Grand Rapids, MI has anything at all in common with Omaha, NE.
Also, agriculture in the Midwest is much different compared with agriculture in the Plains. Agriculture in the Midwest is corn and soybeans that is in a well watered region. Agriculture in the Plains is wheat, IRRIGATED corn and soybeans, and alfalfa.

The irrigation/non-irrigation line is a very significant one and generally divides the Plains from the Midwest. The High Plains is extremely reliant on profligate water mining in order to grow water intensive crops. This is unsustainable in some areas of the High Plains, especially in the southern reaches of the Ogallala Aquifer.
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Old 12-20-2008, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
No matter how you slice it Missouri is Midwestern.
The Missouri Bootheel might as well be Arkansas.
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Old 12-20-2008, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
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1. Omaha (an at last check, it is considered Midwest-like it for city feel, but surrounded by more rural charm.
2. Chicago-Chi town is the big Kahuna no doubt, but prefer Omaha if I lived in this part of the nation.
That's it-if I lived in Midwest-it would be either of these.
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Old 12-22-2008, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,812 posts, read 16,666,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grmasterb View Post
The Missouri Bootheel might as well be Arkansas.
Missouri as a whole is Midwestern. The bootheel is more south, though.
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Old 12-22-2008, 09:11 AM
 
Location: IN
20,857 posts, read 35,987,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetpotater58 View Post
1. Omaha (an at last check, it is considered Midwest-like it for city feel, but surrounded by more rural charm.
2. Chicago-Chi town is the big Kahuna no doubt, but prefer Omaha if I lived in this part of the nation.
That's it-if I lived in Midwest-it would be either of these.
I am more of a small city person as well.

However, I would prefer living near the Great Lakes region of the Midwest because I prefer the heavily wooded areas compared to the wide open Plains with horrific winds.
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Old 12-22-2008, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Downtown Omaha
1,362 posts, read 4,202,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The Great Plains is a sub-region of the Midwest, but MUCH different. You can't really say that a city like Grand Rapids, MI has anything at all in common with Omaha, NE.
Also, agriculture in the Midwest is much different compared with agriculture in the Plains. Agriculture in the Midwest is corn and soybeans that is in a well watered region. Agriculture in the Plains is wheat, IRRIGATED corn and soybeans, and alfalfa.

The irrigation/non-irrigation line is a very significant one and generally divides the Plains from the Midwest. The High Plains is extremely reliant on profligate water mining in order to grow water intensive crops. This is unsustainable in some areas of the High Plains, especially in the southern reaches of the Ogallala Aquifer.
I doubt Omaha and Grand Rapids are that different. And farming has nothing to do with it since no major city in the midwest is based on farming.
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Old 12-22-2008, 11:50 AM
 
Location: IN
20,857 posts, read 35,987,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
I doubt Omaha and Grand Rapids are that different. And farming has nothing to do with it since no major city in the midwest is based on farming.
Yes, but most Midwest cities are "gateway cities," that are surrounded by lots of cropland and very small towns. It is always good to analyze the working rural environment surrounding cities in the Midwest region.
Also, some commercial agriculture companies have headquarters in cities in the Midwest as well.
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