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Old 12-22-2008, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Nebraska is divided between the two, the eastern 1/4 or 1/3 is Mid West, the the western remainder is the plains.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:05 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burgerflipper View Post
I heard many now consider Nebraska as part of the Pacific Northwest region due to it's proximity to the pacific ocean and it's mountainous forest areas.
.

I like the Pine Ridge area around Chadron
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:07 PM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by Go Ne View Post
Nebraska is divided between the two, the eastern 1/4 or 1/3 is Mid West, the the western remainder is the plains.
Yes
Central and Western portions of Nebraska also have much more irrigated cropland compared with very little for eastern Nebraska.
Once you get west of the 98th meridian I would say that one has crossed into the American West.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Downtown Omaha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I never disagreed with your thoughts on the population distribution in Nebraska. However, I still think the irrigation/non-irrgation line is a good demarcation zone between the Midwest and West. I think of the Central Plains region as the beginning of the American West.
In terms of climate differences most of Nebraska averages far less precipitation compared with any location in Iowa. Yes the crops might be similar, but NE uses a lot of irrigation in its rural central and western areas and Iowa uses none.

That may be but that idea would be lost on most people in Nebraska (myself included) that we aren't in the Midwest since most identify with that as opposed to the West.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Omaha
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http://www.manifold.net/cases/cd_map/tl_25_dropshad_map_med.jpg (broken link)
[CENTER][/CENTER]







Every regional map I can find shows Nebraska as Midwest
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:36 PM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
That may be but that idea would be lost on most people in Nebraska (myself included) that we aren't in the Midwest since most identify with that as opposed to the West.
I agree that Omaha is Midwestern compared with North Platte, which is out on the High Plains.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Omaha
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Personally, I think North Dakota straight down to Texas should be considered a region of it's own. Everything from economies, landscape, and climate..ok not climate - are very similar.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:55 PM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by burgerflipper View Post








Every regional map I can find shows Nebraska as Midwest
Yes, but cultural, landscape, geographical, and climatic differences can be pretty large because the Midwest itself is enormous in total area. I still think that calling both Duluth, MN and North Platte, NE "Midwest" seems a little strange to me.
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Old 12-22-2008, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Downtown Omaha
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Just like NYC and Dover are East Coast cities.
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Old 12-22-2008, 03:06 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTO Luv View Post
Just like NYC and Dover are East Coast cities.

That is why we have sub-regions
Great Lakes= MN, WI, MI, IL, IN, OH
Midwest (non-Great Lakes)= IA, northern & central MO, eastern sections of ND, SD, NE, and KS.
Plains= central and western ND, NE, KS, SD (excluding Black Hills).
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