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Old 02-18-2009, 12:22 AM
 
Location: southern california
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i think i do but people have layered accents sometimes.
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post


Yes it is. He is from Little Rock, AR. Are you going to tell me Arkansas isn't in the South?

Any true Southerner would know that there is more than one type of Southern accent.
I agree that this guy does have a Southern accent, but it's so slight that most people who were raised in the South wouldn't consider it to be Southern. Here in Memphis, his accent would just be considered neutral American. A lot of people in Memphis talk like that. We only consider someone's accent to be Southern if it's really strong.
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Old 02-18-2009, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I agree that this guy does have a Southern accent, but it's so slight that most people who were raised in the South wouldn't consider it to be Southern. Here in Memphis, his accent would just be considered neutral American. A lot of people in Memphis talk like that. We only consider someone's accent to be Southern if it's really strong.
Thanks for finding the common ground. I am very southern but have lived in many places and my accent isn't as strong as others. However, friends and coworkers from other areas of the country do hear a definite southern accent in me.

This guy just sounds like normal TV mid-America broadcasting voice, his vowel sounds are short and precise, no making one syllable words into two syllables, no drawl. His long 'i' is proper, not the common i in southern that sounds more like ah. He crisply annunciates his final consonants, the t's d's and ng's. He pronounces his r's unlike Jimmy Caaahhhh tuh nor does he add them where there are none (gotta go up stahrs and warsh mah hahr).

Where is the southerness in this speech? I don't hear it. The only thing I hear that might sound sounthern is he is a little more slower paced in his rhythic pattern, it is definitely not a fast clip, but I would see this as a broadcasting speech rule. Can't have the weather machined gunned at us now can we?
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Old 02-18-2009, 01:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Thanks for finding the common ground. I am very southern but have lived in many places and my accent isn't as strong as others. However, friends and coworkers from other areas of the country do hear a definite southern accent in me.

This guy just sounds like normal TV mid-America broadcasting voice, his vowel sounds are short and precise, no making one syllable words into two syllables, no drawl. His long 'i' is proper, not the common i in southern that sounds more like ah. He crisply annunciates his final consonants, the t's d's and ng's. He pronounces his r's unlike Jimmy Caaahhhh tuh nor does he add them where there are none (gotta go up stahrs and warsh mah hahr).

Where is the southerness in this speech? I don't hear it. The only thing I hear that might sound sounthern is he is a little more slower paced in his rhythic pattern, it is definitely not a fast clip, but I would see this as a broadcasting speech rule. Can't have the weather machined gunned at us now can we?
I noticed the slight Southern accent mostly in the beggining of the clip. When he says "rotaay-tion" "precipitaay-tion" "cintered" instead of "centered" "cintral" "advah-sory" "purducing" instead of "producing"
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Old 02-18-2009, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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Yes, he DEFINITELY has a Southern accent! He sounds 100% southern, and I would never mistake someone with that accent as being from the Midwest. As I said before, you can't hear your own accent.

I don't think I have an accent, but when I visited the Deep South I was instantly picked out for my "northern accent" - it was very noticeable.
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:30 AM
 
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I agree with Smtchll. The guy has a southern accent, but a very slight one. It's still quite close to General American accent. Although it's possible that he has a stronger southern accent off-camera.

Henry Cho has a very strong southern accent. When you hear an audio recording of him talking, you can hardly imagine it being produced by someone who is not Anglo. Like it or not, we do associate accents with certain things, including ethnicities.

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Old 02-19-2009, 10:33 AM
 
Location: in purgurtory in London
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I'm very well travelled and I like to think cultured , but it blew my mind when the man with a thick Italian accent I had emailed and spoken to regarding an unplanned puppy showed up on my door step and was of Chinese heritage. He was first generation Chinese Italian. Way cool.
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:07 AM
 
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Yeah, I have a friend who was born in Asia but lives in the South (adopted). He has an extreme southern accent (it's all he knows), but appearance-wise it is funny if you don't know him. His voice does not match his looks at all, not that there is anything wrong with it. For the longest time, I looked twice everytime I heard him talk. But, now it's just a part of who he is. Just like I speak with some Spanglish since I'm a white kid from New Mexico. It's not a big deal, just part of who we are.
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Old 02-19-2009, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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I am Taiwanese-American (born in New York, spent early childhood there, but grew up in Southern California). I have Taiwanese-American friends from Tennessee and Alabama and they grew up there. And yes, they do have a Southern accent. So, yes, I have seen Asian-Americans with legitimate Southern accents. I've also encountered Asians with stronger New Yorker accents, general English accents (from England), Australian accents, Argentinian accents when speaking English. So, yes, Asians can have a variety of accents.
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Old 01-05-2010, 05:48 PM
 
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Post Sa

My first post in 2010.
Happy New Year y'all!

Quote:
Originally Posted by twnxn View Post
I am Taiwanese-American (born in New York, spent early childhood there, but grew up in Southern California). I have Taiwanese-American friends from Tennessee and Alabama and they grew up there. And yes, they do have a Southern accent. So, yes, I have seen Asian-Americans with legitimate Southern accents. I've also encountered Asians with stronger New Yorker accents, general English accents (from England), Australian accents, Argentinian accents when speaking English. So, yes, Asians can have a variety of accents.
I've just finished watching the Blind Side and was reminded of this subject again.

I guess Southern Accent among Asians is least expected because unlike the regional accents from other areas of the US, the Southern Accent is strongly associated with the "Southern Culture", which most Asians and most non-Southeners don't really associate with. A reason why a great part of non-White and/or non-Southerners who live in or moved to the South end up speaking more or less "General American", with a slight southern touch at the most.
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