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Old 12-11-2009, 12:29 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,275,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
Growing up in the north and living in the south now I can say that dense sprawl is a lot cleaner/nicer looking than most dense northern neighborhoods. In the sunbelt a lot of attention is paid to landscaping and the like which creates a very nice environment. I dont know why so many northern forumers act like people up north do not drive anywhere and do not have any strip malls, this is America isnt it?!?
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Old 12-13-2009, 06:35 PM
 
50 posts, read 175,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
Growing up in the north and living in the south now I can say that dense sprawl is a lot cleaner/nicer looking than most dense northern neighborhoods. In the sunbelt a lot of attention is paid to landscaping and the like which creates a very nice environment. I dont know why so many northern forumers act like people up north do not drive anywhere and do not have any strip malls, this is America isnt it?!?
Agreed- there are good and bad examples of suburban development everywhere. However, in my experience, the northeast and northwest do a better job of embracing "smart growth" and concentrating development near transit and creating walkable, truly mixed use communities. One problem is the definition of "dense". According to the new LEED-ND standards that are coming out, a project would not be able to obtain the LEED green certification unless it is at least 7 units per acre. I dare say there are very few suburban, single family developments in the sunbelt that will qualify for this certification.
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Old 12-13-2009, 10:51 PM
 
1,012 posts, read 2,246,571 times
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Definately Phoenix. Everything is not only ugly, but identical.
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Old 12-13-2009, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,995 posts, read 8,868,377 times
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Nearly every metro area outside of the urban centers, older areas, etc...
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Old 12-17-2009, 05:42 AM
 
21,196 posts, read 30,388,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiveUrban View Post
Sunbelt suburbs. Suburban developers care little about sustainability.

Strip malls start to become run down after 10 years, whereas new urbanist architecture will be sustainable for years to come.
Exactly. Not just strip malls either, but many of the homes begin to fall apart after 10+ years. Then they devalue and essentially turn into suburban ghettos.
Depressing.
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Old 12-17-2009, 10:09 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,455,026 times
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I love Houston, it's my hometown, but I'm going to have to say it takes this one. Yes, other areas have a lot of the very same type of sprawl, even the Boston area where I live now. But Houston takes the cake on this one for a couple reasons. One, because of the sheer amount of it. There are A LOT of strip malls, massive roads too dangerous to cross on foot, and general suburban-style development. Way too much of it. Two, and honestly I think this is the bigger problem, there is very, very little consideration given to aesthetics in Houston, which is a shame because just a little mindfulness in this department could go a long way in alleviating the impact of the endless sea of parking lots. There is lots of urban blight in Houston with boarded-up buildings sitting vacant, empty fields with weeds, potholes in the streets, such run-down shacks in poor neighborhoods you'd think you were in the Bottoms in Mississippi. There's not enough landscaping or integrating of the city's natural landscape. This is what happens when you let business owners and developers run rampant. Don't get me wrong. There are some very nice, even beautiful areas, and the city has improved overall in the past decade or so. There have been successful initiatives to do some landscaping, plant trees along medians, take down billboards, and so on, but the city still has a ways to go. Hopefully it will continue on that track rather than turning every available plot of land into a strip mall. I have faith!
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Old 04-26-2010, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Jersey Boy living in Florida
3,732 posts, read 7,099,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
Most of the Sunbelt cities. Funny how people keep moving there though. I guess people like that element of tackiness. IMO, in a way, it does eliminate an element of pretentiousness.
People move to the sunbelt because of the weather, have fun shoveling snow in Boston lol.
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Old 04-26-2010, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Jersey Boy living in Florida
3,732 posts, read 7,099,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNYDC View Post
Myrtle Beach, FL -- sad to see such a beautiful setting on the beach be trashed so badly by sprawl and schlock.
There is a Myrtle Beach in Florida?
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Old 04-26-2010, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Jersey Boy living in Florida
3,732 posts, read 7,099,291 times
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The only problem I have with the west coast is that everything looks brown and deserty
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Old 04-27-2010, 01:24 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,325,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clean_polo View Post
People move to the sunbelt because of the weather, have fun shoveling snow in Boston lol.
Actually usually due to job opportunities and low costs

Northern cities would be thankful if they had those two things in abundance like the sunbelt! (or at least pre economy. I don't know post recession)
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