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Old 10-18-2008, 07:28 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,449,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
That is what I assumed originally last night, and replied accordingly. Then, this morning, I got to thinking maybe I was wrong. And apologized accordingly. NOW...I call upon the OP to clarify.

I don't have a problem at all with linking my South with "country". Because to me, it calls up memories of those old cotton fields back home and comfort food and catfishing and canepoles. Yep. That's country, and its Southern. And I wouldn't trade it, as Charlie Pride once said, for a mansion in Prague.

If, on the other hand, the intent is to link it to ignorance and backwardness? Then I call upon whomever is so ignorant in their own smug right to do so, to just step right up to the plate and explain themselves so the matter can be discussed!... and
Yes, the OP needs to clarify what he's getting at. There are "country" folks in Massachusetts, Vermont, Wisconsin, Colorado, Montana, Washington, Oregon, Idaho... "country" and "Southern" aren't synonymous.
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Old 10-18-2008, 07:43 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,398 posts, read 7,142,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I honestly would have to pick either Arkansas or Tennessee. The Deep South is not "country" like the Upper South...I honestly don't think the Deep South has as many hicks as the Upper South. When I think country, I think hillbillies with Southern accents, Southern culture, a fiddle, and in hills. The Ozarks somewhat fit into this profile, but not really due to the fact they are an oasis for both the Midwest and Upper South. When I think "country", I think West Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas.
Watch how you use that " hick" and "hillbilly" term, damn yankee. I was born in NC, and I have NEVER seen anyone that I would classify that way.
Have you ever even been to this neck of the woods, or are you just stereotyping?
You seem to have a derogatory opinion of the South in and of itself.
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Old 10-18-2008, 07:59 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,683,064 times
Reputation: 1866
The Louisiana culture regardless of what area of the state is a HUNTING culture. Honestly that is the biggest pastime in the state. Bigger than fishing. You can say that both city and country people in this state are avid hunters. Deer and Duck hunting are the most popular game. Raccoon, possum, etc. are not except maybe among the poor.

Probably the second largest pastime in this state is cooking. Cooking all that game and fish. Fishing off the coast as well as inland lakes are very popular.

Now as far as "country ways"; I don't know what exactly your expecting. I don't know many who are not near a city or town. The traffic on the roads and highways is always busy. The accents vary, but most are not real strong in any direction. I never hear the old "Gone with the Wind" southern accent.

Most people I know drive nice trucks and SUVs; some do have green vehicles. ATVs, jetskis, bass and ski boats, are all common here and the culture is one of go and do.
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Old 10-18-2008, 08:10 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
Watch how you use that " hick" and "hillbilly" term, damn yankee. I was born in NC, and I have NEVER seen anyone that I would classify that way.
Have you ever even been to this neck of the woods, or are you just stereotyping?
You seem to have a derogatory opinion of the South in and of itself.
I'm not being deragatory, you're just being a South Carolinian that is looking for a reason to attack an outsider. And I have been to your neck of the woods....by hicks I mean more along the line of rural, impoverished, etc. I'm not saying that's a bad thing, if you can't accept the fact that most of the rural South is poor, then I guess you can't accept the truth.
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Old 10-18-2008, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,037,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I always respect and appreciate your opinions on things like this (and we generally agree), but I am not so sure on this one.

It would backtrack of course to question by what criteria one defines "country"?

Is it by urban vs. rural population ratios? In that case, you are right. Texas would be out of the running quickly. OR...can it be defined as the percentage of country music stations to rap or modern day rock? In which case, Texas is right up there. In fact, as was sorta alluded to earlier, when the "South" is defined by the number of times a state is mentioned in country music lyrics, and where country music stars were born, then the "western" and "upper" South become the "deep South"! LOL

Anyway, point is...what standards are being used to define "country"?
lol I see what you're saying but that is an interesting question. I know there is a difference between southern and country and like houstoner said, there are just as many if not more country hickish areas in the Northeast, Midwest, and Interior West as they are in the South. So the OP probably needs to revisit this thread and clarify what he was trying to get to.
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,506 posts, read 7,309,750 times
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Ok I might have to clarify what I mean. In your opinion, what southern state is very southern; meaning the accent, enviroment, food, southern slang, southern hospitality, and other stuff. If that help anything
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Road Warrior
2,015 posts, read 5,004,008 times
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Texas well it's Southern I give you that but it's as much as it's own "country" and a mish mash of country western, southwestern, mestizo and Texas Republic in my opinion. Hospitality is to be found all over the South from Kentucky to South Carolina to Louisiana and even Florida. Accents do vary from State to State, Tennesseans is particularly homely and my favorite, yet some Cajuns in Louisiana I still can't comprehend even today. But my vote goes to Mississippi, can't get any deeper South than Ole Miss.
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:36 PM
 
104 posts, read 220,557 times
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I think Tennessee is most likely to present itself as such. However, in a general sense I say it's a toss up. Each state/area has its own take on Southern.

Louisiana is very Southern in my opinion; it's just that it's unique take is the most recognized of the different states. Same as Texas. I wouldn't feel equally comfy in every Southern state. Outside of Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana, I don't feel as at home.

Appalachia is different from Mississippi Delta/Gulf Coast (not quite the same), Piedmont, Blackbelt or Atlantic Coastal. Which is more Southern? I can't really say (other than geographically). The mountains tend to be more twangy and the coasts more drawlly. There are tons of regional variations on barbecue (vinegar-base sauce, tomato-base sauce, mayonnaise-base sauce, mustard-based sauce, beef, pork, chicken, etc.). Which one is most authentic? They all are (except places that boil meat and serve sauce with it; I ask myself what kind of fool thought that that was a good idea.).

Now that the politically correct answer is out of the way: Alabama. Mostly because I identify myself as a Southerner and I associate "Southern things" based off the way they are back home.
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:49 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,398 posts, read 7,142,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I'm not being deragatory, you're just being a South Carolinian that is looking for a reason to attack an outsider. And I have been to your neck of the woods....by hicks I mean more along the line of rural, impoverished, etc. I'm not saying that's a bad thing, if you can't accept the fact that most of the rural South is poor, then I guess you can't accept the truth.
Actually, I consider myself a Carolina girl all around. I wasnt looking for a reason, but the term "hick" when one reads a post kind of jumps out, especially when one's state of birth (and where much of one's family still resides) is mentioned.
FYI, the term "Hick" and "Hillbilly" is insulting, even when referring to those areas that are poor. People, especially in NC, get very, very tired of being called those things.
As far as rural, please define that. Many of those in my particular area that are tucked away in the "rural" regions are actually the ones that are most wealthy. Usually in the form of horse people.
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Old 10-18-2008, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,320 posts, read 2,744,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I honestly would have to pick either Arkansas or Tennessee. The Deep South is not "country" like the Upper South...
When I think "country", I think West Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas.
I think there is a certain amount of truth in this. I've seen "country" used against "southern" as if they were mutually exclusive. Certainly there are commonalities to people living in rural areas (and not just in the US), just as there are to people living in urban areas. Southerners listen to "country" music, not "southern" music. I took the OP to mean what areas of the South are the most rural, with fewest metropolitan centers. But if we are going to get into what state is the most "southern", we might as well kill this thread now.
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