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Old 10-19-2008, 10:15 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,117,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
Ok I might have to clarify what I mean. In your opinion, what southern state is very southern; meaning the accent, enviroment, food, southern slang, southern hospitality, and other stuff. If that help anything
Ok. Thanks for clarifying, Chicago L. What it seems you are asking is what Southern state is "most Southern." No offence (because you really did explain well and seem on the level and courteous to all!), but as Houstoner said earlier, this topic really HAS been done to death in the past! LOL

Still though, I see you are relatively new to the forum, so you may have never seen some of the past threads on the subject. Here are a couple though:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/gener...-southern.html

In tandem a bit, was another which discussed, like the term "country" as to relative definition, exactly what it is that makes the South "Southern"?

What makes the South "Southern"?

Sooooo, to answer what I believe to be your question, I am just going to "paste" a post I wrote on the "ranking" thread. I HAVE however, changed the wording and rationales a bit in light of that I have learned a few things since then from some of my friends (such as Bobilee and Catfish) as concerns their own states.

Here goes (I start by a VERY broad definition of the South. That is, what the U.S. Census Bureau establishes...plus Missouri):

From least to most, along with my own personal thoughts and opinions:

Bench warmers..

17. Delaware - (nothing Southern about it other than Census definition)

16. Maryland - (a few Southern aspects, but Census definition is main reason it can ever be considered Southern)

15. Missouri - (southern parts of Missouri have some characterisitcs of the mountain South, but for the most part it is a midwestern state)

Now for the ones that really matter. Third team:

14. West Virginia - (Mountain South that blends with the northern appalachian region of Pennsylvania. Right or wrong (and I happen to think it's wrong) its seperation from parent state of Virginia during the WBTS and the Confederacy pretty much forever limits its status as a Southern state in the minds of many).

13. Oklahoma - (some very decent and solid Southern characteristics south of Oklahoma City and east of Tulsa due to influence of Texas and Arkansas settlers), but it gets more "midwestern" north and west of the above lines).

12: Florida (Historically unquestionably Southern, and north of Orlando, still very much so. However, the decades long outside migration has considerably diluted a good part of the state's earlier character. Very sad).

Second team. And the order can be very easily re-arranged:

11. Kentucky - (Had Kentucky officially and truly joined the Confederacy, its status as a Southern state today would probably not be the subject of much debate. On the other hand, mint julips and fried chicken are a state icon, and it is said it indeed DID "join the Confederacy after the War", as evidenced by the fact that it observes a Confederate holiday and statues in memory of the CSA are numerous.)

10. Virginia - (It is hard to think of the birthplace of Confederate heroes such as Robert E. Lee, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson (to just name the permier), and that the capital of the Confederacy was in Richmond, as being anything BUT Southern. Yet, sadly, northern migration into the northern part of the state has had an impact.)

9. Texas - (THIS is a story in itself and, as a native Texan, I agree with the old axiom that Texas is a region unto itself in many ways. However, in terms of affiliation, it essentially a Southern state. Some parts more than others of course, but in the whole scheme of things, the very much "Deep South" character of East Texas more than "balances out" the very much "southwestern" qualities of the trans-pecos area. East Texas is where the Deep South begins, and even most of West Texas was settled by migrating Southernerns. The cultural impact was and remains, very Southern. Still, many things, not of the least of which are demographic trends in terms of migration (legal or otherwise) have diluted Texas, overall, as being considered a purely Southern state in the classic sense).

Now, for the "starting" lineup! First team.

8. Arkansas - ( An Upper South state that didn't secede until after Ft. Sumter, but unquestionably Southern, even if a combination of Deep and Mountain South, in character)

7. North Carolina (Upper South that didn't secede until after Ft. Sumter, yet had an absolute history of devotion to the Confederacy when it did. Some parts more Southern than others, but pork BBQ for sure secures its status)

6. Tennessee (Again, it joined the Confederacy late, but anyone who has ever vistited there, especially in Memphis and certain other parts, don't question it being Southern).

5. Louisiana (the northern part of the state is Deep South. The reason I rank it #5 is that there is a heavy Catholic and French Cajun influence in the southern part which, while Southern in its way, is not typical of the other a parts of the traditional Deep South).

4. South Carolina - (The first state to secede, and with the most support within. The ONLY reason I don't rank it as "most Southern" is the colonial influence and its own certain (and admirable) brand of independence. However, South Carolina, and the states that follow are those which absolutely embrace and proclaim their "Southerness")

3. Georgia - (Gone With the Wind. The Empire State of The South, epitome of the "southern accent". ONLY problem is Atlanta nowdays!)

2. Alabama - (Azaleas, plantations, DEEP Deep South thru and thru. Literally, in all ways, the geographical "Heart of Dixie" whether or not one defines "The South" by the Old Confederacy, or the commonly thought of Deep South states (South Carolina thru Louisiana). Only reason it is second is that the northern part is a bit different from the Old South way of life in the southern parts).

1. Mississippi - (I might mention that this is my own ancestral state, but I dont think that fact influences my opinion. Mississippi combines all things commonly considered "Southern" with very few dilutions at all).

There, I done it! And prepared to catch kudos or hell over it! LOL

Last edited by TexasReb; 10-19-2008 at 11:02 AM..
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Old 10-19-2008, 10:29 AM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,868,840 times
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You know you are in the South if the only Iced Tea a fast food place has to sell you is Sweet Tea.

You are in a borderline area if they have some Unsweet Tea "in the back somewhere."

You are not in the south if the default Iced tea is just Iced Tea, plain tea, not full of sugar unless you add it yourself after market.
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Old 10-19-2008, 10:45 AM
 
208 posts, read 540,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
In terms of the HIGHEST total percentage of the population that does not reside in metropolitan or micropolitan areas the winners are:
Kentucky
Mississippi
Arkansas
West Virginia
Interesting.

If I'm not mistaken, I think Vermont has the highest percentage of residents living in rural areas. Maine is up there too, but I'm not sure how it ranks.
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Old 10-19-2008, 10:57 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,117,165 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
You know you are in the South if the only Iced Tea a fast food place has to sell you is Sweet Tea.

You are in a borderline area if they have some Unsweet Tea "in the back somewhere."

You are not in the south if the default Iced tea is just Iced Tea, plain tea, not full of sugar unless you add it yourself after market.
I can see the point, but I gotta disagree a bit. While the so-called "sweet tea" line has -- like the "grits line" -- some validity, there is something else that has to be taken into account, especially as concerns Texas (and I would guess some other states).

That is, there has for quite a while been a VERY large "disconnect" between the tea (read: Iced..as in the South it is never anything but) served in many Texas restaurants and what is commonly brewed "at home" in the state.

In the former, tea most often comes "unsweetened" and one does their own "sweetening" (which doesn't work right) from the sugar bowl or flask always on the table!

On the other hand? Go to almost any native Texans' home and the tea brewed will be "sweet", in the classic Southern tradition. In fact, I have a standing money bet with anyone who wants to take me up on it as to the veracity of that statement! LOL

In a nutshell, I would just quibble with what you say as to qualify that one is out of the general South when sweet tea is not the staple of home!

Last edited by TexasReb; 10-19-2008 at 11:42 AM..
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Old 10-19-2008, 10:59 AM
 
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I don't know anyone who makes home brewed Sweet Tea and I am a native Texan.
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Old 10-19-2008, 11:09 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,398 posts, read 7,146,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Rural regions are any part of a state that is not in the metropolitan area of a major city. in the country, so to speak. And don't blame the terms on me, and don't attack me for saying them...as far as i'm concerned, you are the first person to take offense to the term. Most people I know don't get bothered by it. And I'm not saying all rural regions in the south are poor, but the vast majority of them are.

And most of the people you know live where?? Missouri? If so, MUCH different from the Carolina's dear.
Or perhaps the people you're speaking down here to are simply not correcting you, but are thinking you're a jerk behind your back. I know my family and their neighbors find this term very offensive.I have seen strangers such as yourself use the terms "hillbilly" and " hick" within a group and be instantly shut out because of it.

Just because you arent corrected on the use of a word doesnt mean you havent peeved somebody off. Our manners generally rule our behavior down here.

I suggest, sir, you take note of them and employ them yourself.
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Old 10-19-2008, 11:10 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,117,165 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
I don't know anyone who makes home brewed Sweet Tea and I am a native Texan.
I am too. Fourth generation. So we might make a friendly bet with each other on this 'un!

I am not trying to be a "smartass" or anything, so please don't take it that way, but how long has your "family" been in Texas? Honestly, I have yet to meet a Texan whose lines extend any further back than second generation, who doesn't make sweet tea at home. And again, with all due respect, I can understand why that you living in North Dallas might, IMHO, have a lot of influence on your observations.

Here is an interesting article on the subject:

http://www.tylerpaper.com/apps/pbcs....FOOD/705290303

And again, my friendly bet stands!

Last edited by TexasReb; 10-19-2008 at 11:33 AM..
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Old 10-19-2008, 11:11 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,398 posts, read 7,146,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
I don't know anyone who makes home brewed Sweet Tea and I am a native Texan.
Oh bless your heart...you poor thing! No homemade sweettea?

Id die.
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Old 10-19-2008, 11:21 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,117,165 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
Oh bless your heart...you poor thing! No homemade sweettea?

Id die.
LOL. Wellll, hon, I gotta admit (and hope it doesn't cost me my native Texan/Southern credentials), I actually PREFER unsweetened!

But such a thang definitely wasn't what I grew up drinking and that almost everyone I ever knew or visited served in their homes! That is to say, I was considered the "red-headed stepchild" when, at family reunions, I would go pour mine out that small rusty and dusty container with the "unsweetned" stuff!

Last edited by TexasReb; 10-19-2008 at 11:39 AM..
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Old 10-19-2008, 11:25 AM
 
1,123 posts, read 168,726 times
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LOL...that's when we know, we are almost home from road trips. Sweet tea is back on the menu.
On the way home from our last road trip, I begged my house/dog sitter to please make sure she made us some sweet tea. I don't know what happend...I made great sweet tea in the 5 gallon jug. Now I can't seem to get it right for a gallon.
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