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View Poll Results: Which do you prefer: Suburban, Urban or Rural?
Suburban 22 27.85%
Urban 22 27.85%
Rural 28 35.44%
Other (if I missed a designation) 7 8.86%
Voters: 79. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-20-2007, 10:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_pines View Post
You forgot the exurbs. The suburbs of the suburbs. Thats where I like to be. In the exurbs of a medium sized city(2.5 mill and down, anything above that is to much congestion). The houses with the larger yards and longer driveways set back into the properties for some privacy. But not to far from a city.
Interesting, the_pines! How do you distinguish an exurb from a suburb? Isn't an exurb just the front range of a metro area's suburban growth? In other words, aren't yesterday's exurbs today's suburbs? Why do you prefer an exurb over a suburb?
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Old 02-20-2007, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia
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Urban. I wasn't made for the 'burbs! And after spending many summers in Cusseta, Ga rural settings arent for me.
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Old 02-20-2007, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 24,907,732 times
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Nice to see more responses.

Sorry I forgot exburbs, but there is other if that helps. One other member also mentioned it.

I suppose it would be a good idea to qualify what some of the designations mean. If I am reading some of the responses correctly, rural and suburban may be viewed very differently from one person to another.

When I think of rural I really mean "more remote" with open land, farm or ranch land, and long sweeping landscape.
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Old 02-20-2007, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Tampa Bay
1,020 posts, read 3,068,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Interesting, the_pines! How do you distinguish an exurb from a suburb? Isn't an exurb just the front range of a metro area's suburban growth? In other words, aren't yesterday's exurbs today's suburbs? Why do you prefer an exurb over a suburb?
I guess given growth they would eventually be incorporated as suburbs. But a lot of times they're small self sufficient cities by themselves. I dont like being cramped. I like privacy, seeing the sky at night, and the relative quieteness around. Generally they're more affordable too and are able to maintain their schools and infastructure better.

Housing is way to expensive nowdays and there are fees for every small thing someone can get out of you anymore. People are paying out so much wasted money and a lot of times for invisible services they will nave have or that dont benefit them. Its nice to try and elminate a lot of that stuff.

Big cities and suburbs rate their prices by what bob next doors sells his house for. Mainly its based off of average income for the area which is flat out wrong in my opinion. Just becuse people make a certain amount doesnt mean people should have pay a certain amount because those rates look fair. It doesnt mean a lot of people are making that average amount either. Notice that doesnt work for a lot of other things except for the necessities people need? When does it stop when the kids need to work so a family can live in a decent area with quality education.

It used to be determined by the quality of the product you're getting and your money went A LOT farther. A man could buy an home for a family and pay it off at around the time he would retire. If a person was willing to work hard they could keep even remedial jobs and provide service that people needed and still make a living.

Im not worried about the whole cultural push as much as I am quality of life and good schools for my girls. Nor is weather the only determining factor. I think longterm sustainable growth is much better than rapid and unnatural cultural booming anyway. If my neighbors are from someplace else thats fine. If not, thats fine too.

Sometimes they will have more small businesses that help the local economy also. I also think urban sprawl is good for people. It keeps prices more affordable, keeps stress down and allows for a higher quality of life in some places.

Big cities have a gazillion problems and it can cause people to be miserable. Zoning laws are obsessive, taxes and everything else they can throw at you anymore is burdensome. I think smaller self sufficient cities are a much better alternative for a healthier life without the peer pressures and as many burdens.
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Old 02-20-2007, 06:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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There are suburbs and there are suburbs. I grew up in what would probably be defined by the demographers and some people on this thread as an exurb: 30 miles from Pittsburgh. We lived a fairly urban lifestyle in that place: walked to school, took the bus to the downtown area (not downtown Pitts), etc. The houses were older for the most part, garages were detached.
There was another place a few miles away that fits the definition of a sterile suburb perfectly. This was the 50s and 60s and most of the homes were being built then. There was not much walking, and few public services.

I currently live in a city that is about the same distance from Denver. It has 25,000 people. It is an old coal-mining town. We have a small downtown with a nice library and restaurants. The community has maintained its "small town" feel with a big 4th of July celebration, a Fall Festival at Labor Day with the second largest parade in Colorado, and a Parade of Lights in December. We have practically everything you can find in a larger city, but on a smaller scale. We have an arts center, a recreation center, the library, a golf course, etc. We have the proximitry to Denver if we want to go to a really professional play, the museums, or of course, the professional sports. While it is impossible to define just what a "good" school system is, most students at our local high school go on to college. We don't have a lot of crime or litter. We have some low income housing, but nothing you would call a slum. Do I like it? Yes, obviously.

I like a yard for a garden, and when the kids were little, for a play area. It sure beats taking them to the park or playground when it's time to fix dinner. Another advantage of the 'burbs is that they usually attract a lot of families, so the kids generally have someone nearby around their ages to play with.

I have tried city living, both in Pittsburgh and Denver. We moved here originally because the housing prices were lower for what you got, and because we liked the (then) small community (5000 people) atmosphere.
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Old 02-20-2007, 07:19 PM
 
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Default the_pines

Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
There are suburbs and there are suburbs. I grew up in what would probably be defined by the demographers and some people on this thread as an exurb: 30 miles from Pittsburgh. We lived a fairly urban lifestyle in that place: walked to school, took the bus to the downtown area (not downtown Pitts), etc. The houses were older for the most part, garages were detached.
There was another place a few miles away that fits the definition of a sterile suburb perfectly. This was the 50s and 60s and most of the homes were being built then. There was not much walking, and few public services.

I currently live in a city that is about the same distance from Denver. It has 25,000 people. It is an old coal-mining town. We have a small downtown with a nice library and restaurants. The community has maintained its "small town" feel with a big 4th of July celebration, a Fall Festival at Labor Day with the second largest parade in Colorado, and a Parade of Lights in December. We have practically everything you can find in a larger city, but on a smaller scale. We have an arts center, a recreation center, the library, a golf course, etc. We have the proximitry to Denver if we want to go to a really professional play, the museums, or of course, the professional sports. While it is impossible to define just what a "good" school system is, most students at our local high school go on to college. We don't have a lot of crime or litter. We have some low income housing, but nothing you would call a slum. Do I like it? Yes, obviously.

I like a yard for a garden, and when the kids were little, for a play area. It sure beats taking them to the park or playground when it's time to fix dinner. Another advantage of the 'burbs is that they usually attract a lot of families, so the kids generally have someone nearby around their ages to play with.

I have tried city living, both in Pittsburgh and Denver. We moved here originally because the housing prices were lower for what you got, and because we liked the (then) small community (5000 people) atmosphere.
So the_pines, do you consider what Pittnurse describes here as an exurb?
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Old 02-21-2007, 09:14 AM
 
7,968 posts, read 18,078,632 times
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You know, it's funny that this topic should come up as I go back and forth on this from time to time, depending on my mood. Sometimes I want to be "in the middle of it all" and live in a busy urban neighborhood. Other times, I feel like getting away from everybody and moving to some exurban if even rural town. Ironically, it seems like I've made somewhat of a compromise with myself as I live in an inner-ring DC suburb.

Having lived most of my life living and/or working up in Philadelphia, my current lifestyle is a little less convenient albeit more affordable. Being in my later 30's, trendy nightlife has become less important to me, if it ever was. But then my current neighborhood, located just off a major commuting road, is not as pedestrian-friendly or transit-accessible as I am used to.

In an ideal world, I suppose I'd want to live in a quiet community next to a bustling city neighborhood... or maybe even the "small city" urban environment that others have mentioned here. I like the idea of being near if not surrounded by cultural, culinary and entertainment amenities. Even though I play with the idea of a rural lifestyle, I think would ultimately bore me as I don't have a family to raise and the idea of tending to acres of land - or paying someone to do it - doesn't appeal to me.
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Old 02-21-2007, 10:14 AM
j33
 
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What I really want doesn't exist. I want all the conveniences, quirkiness, cultural opportunities and artistic outlets, diversity, and the pedestrian oriented life of NYC, but in a town of 100,000 people. Sadly, I don't see that happening anytime soon (the smaller towns just don't offer that sort of lifestyle). Hence why I keep slogging it out here in my large urban area where, for example, last night I was able to listen to 3 hours of avant-garde music in a hidden art gallery in the back of a Chinese restaurant for $5 and get a taxi home in 8 minutes.
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Old 02-21-2007, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 24,907,732 times
Reputation: 3840
Unfortunately, it is a compromise no matter which way you go. Being spoiled in a big city, with the advantages you mention, makes it difficult to adjust to having to accept less--but perhaps in my next move, less will be more

Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
What I really want doesn't exist. I want all the conveniences, quirkiness, cultural opportunities and artistic outlets, diversity, and the pedestrian oriented life of NYC, but in a town of 100,000 people. Sadly, I don't see that happening anytime soon (the smaller towns just don't offer that sort of lifestyle). Hence why I keep slogging it out here in my large urban area where, for example, last night I was able to listen to 3 hours of avant-garde music in a hidden art gallery in the back of a Chinese restaurant for $5 and get a taxi home in 8 minutes.
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Old 02-21-2007, 10:31 AM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,739,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
What I really want doesn't exist. I want all the conveniences, quirkiness, cultural opportunities and artistic outlets, diversity, and the pedestrian oriented life of NYC, but in a town of 100,000 people. Sadly, I don't see that happening anytime soon (the smaller towns just don't offer that sort of lifestyle).
Me too...only I'm looking for a town of ~50K.

I think I'll have better luck if I focus instead on inventing human teleportaion.
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