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View Poll Results: Houston or Inland Empire?
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Old 10-16-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
And no rain either.
That's all I need to hear to know I'd be miserable there.
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Old 10-16-2016, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
If you look at avgs, summer in the "real" inland empire (i.e. the part west of the mountains) is a cakewalk compared to Phoenix. Highs in the mid 90's and more importantly low's in the low to mid 60's. And no rain either.
It definitely is not that cold and you know that. I've seen San Bernardino reach 108 regularly. Weather wise it's like Tucson. I've seen 105 in Corona.
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Old 10-16-2016, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
It definitely is not that cold and you know that. I've seen San Bernardino reach 108 regularly. Weather wise it's like Tucson. I've seen 105 in Corona.
That's like saying Phoenix's avg high in the summer is 114° just because it happens a couple times a year, when you and I both know that Phoenix's normal high tops out at 108°

You've SEEN days like that, but those are NOT the avgs. I spent a day in Chino this August that didn't crack 85° despite clear skies. You don't get days like that in Phoenix or Tucson in the summer. The days that break 100° are balanced by days in the 80's, which give's those mid 90's avg highs. And again, the mornings are worlds cooler than even Tucson in the summer. Tucson's normal low in July is 77°, while Ontario's is 64°
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
That's like saying Phoenix's avg high in the summer is 114° just because it happens a couple times a year, when you and I both know that Phoenix's normal high tops out at 108°

You've SEEN days like that, but those are NOT the avgs. I spent a day in Chino this August that didn't crack 85° despite clear skies. You don't get days like that in Phoenix or Tucson in the summer. The days that break 100° are balanced by days in the 80's, which give's those mid 90's avg highs. And again, the mornings are worlds cooler than even Tucson in the summer. Tucson's normal low in July is 77°, while Ontario's is 64°
That is Phoenix's average high. Try taking your own thermometer to read at your level in the street versus several stories or so in the sky (ATC tower in Sky Harbor is where they get temperatures). If the ground can boil eggs that means a street is a minimum of 160 or so right? Maybe 140... but you will feel that heat rise up to you you can't solely rely on high-up air temps when you are standing on a sidewalk on a sunny day it will be hotter than that. Heat comes from above, from the sun, and below you, from the heated Earth. It's why sidewalk/asphalt will feel hotter than a grassy park, even with your shoes on.

Those temperatures are accurate in the middle of a desert and/or high up with no significant UHI like it is in the majority of the Valley. Those temps are accurate at around the carefree highway or so in west valley, that's how far you have to go out of the UHI. Because of this Surprise is always reliably a couple degrees cooler than the center of town.
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
That is Phoenix's average high. Try taking your own thermometer to read at your level in the street versus several stories or so in the sky (ATC tower in Sky Harbor is where they get temperatures). If the ground can boil eggs that means a street is a minimum of 160 or so right? Maybe 140... but you will feel that heat rise up to you you can't solely rely on high-up air temps when you are standing on a sidewalk on a sunny day it will be hotter than that. Heat comes from above, from the sun, and below you, from the heated Earth. It's why sidewalk/asphalt will feel hotter than a grassy park, even with your shoes on.

Those temperatures are accurate in the middle of a desert and/or high up with no significant UHI like it is in the majority of the Valley. Those temps are accurate at around the carefree highway or so in west valley, that's how far you have to go out of the UHI. Because of this Surprise is always reliably a couple degrees cooler than the center of town.
Sky Harbor is in the middle of the city, so the averages are not for the open desert
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Sky Harbor is in the middle of the city, so the averages are not for the open desert
Have you ever been high up before? I have worked a zip line right over the I-17 a few stories up and I'm telling you, that would feel cooler than being right on the I-17.

Sky harbor is no different than that.
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Have you ever been high up before? I have worked a zip line right over the I-17 a few stories up and I'm telling you, that would feel cooler than being right on the I-17.

Sky harbor is no different than that.
I worked construction for two years including the infamous June of 2008, and was a mover during the summer of 09, which had our hottest July ever (and tied for hottest month ever with August 11), so I know hot. And that 140°/160°, I don't buy that you would feel that 3 feet above the ground, from experience. Otherwise, a sunny 65° day here in December would feel like 85° with that logic
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Old 10-16-2016, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I worked construction for two years including the infamous June of 2008, and was a mover during the summer of 09, which had our hottest July ever (and tied for hottest month ever with August 11), so I know hot. And that 140°/160°, I don't buy that you would feel that 3 feet above the ground, from experience. Otherwise, a sunny 65° day here in December would feel like 85° with that logic
Quote:
But Bill Nye the Science Guy tested egg-frying on a griddle on a stove a couple years ago, and found the minimum temperature to cook an egg was 130 degrees Fahrenheit (55 C), but that it took 20 minutes at that relatively low temperature. “So indeed, it can be hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk,” he writes.
Hot Enough to Fry an Egg on the Sidewalk This Weekend?

So 130 degrees Fahrenheit is the minimum to cook eggs on the sidewalk, but it takes a while. You do know we can do that here yes in the summer? I've tested it myself and it has worked. You can also bake cookies in your car if you face your car towards the afternoon sun and leave the cookies on a pan on top of the dash. I saw a video of someone doing that in a Lamborghini (why a Lambo I have no idea).

The sidewalk and the asphalt sort of act like a sponge, absorbing the heat. So does dirt but not as much, grass however not quite.

So you can literally be what, say millimeters depending on your shoe, from a minimum 130 degree temperature surface and claim you won't feel that in any way? Try cooking something on the stove top, the water won't be touching the fire, but it'll eventually boil. Fire heats the stove, which heats up the pot, which will boil the water. Sun heats up the surface, surface heats up whatever it touches due to physics (like your shoe) and your shoe will heat up your sock, and then it will heat up your feet. Heat transfers through touching objects until it reaches equilibrium.

What I am saying is taking a temperature seven stories high or so (not entirely sure how tall the ATC tower is) will not be as accurate as ground-level surface temperatures. We don't live and function at the height of the ATC tower in open air unless you are in construction sometimes you will or my job working a zipline. Heat is not evenly distributed, which is why if I went a couple miles up in the sky right now from here in Tucson there may even be a bit of frost, but no sign of frost in Tucson at all at ground level. It's why Mount Lemmon CAN get snow in the winter and Tucson can't. Hot air rises as cold air is denser, but except for the rare condition of inversions (see SLC) you will never see the opposite happen at our ground level.

The temperatures recorded at Sky Harbor are fairly reliable, but I always add a couple degrees or so to make up for this variable. Unless again, you are in the middle of no where.
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Hot Enough to Fry an Egg on the Sidewalk This Weekend?

So 130 degrees Fahrenheit is the minimum to cook eggs on the sidewalk, but it takes a while. You do know we can do that here yes in the summer? I've tested it myself and it has worked. You can also bake cookies in your car if you face your car towards the afternoon sun and leave the cookies on a pan on top of the dash. I saw a video of someone doing that in a Lamborghini (why a Lambo I have no idea).

The sidewalk and the asphalt sort of act like a sponge, absorbing the heat. So does dirt but not as much, grass however not quite.

So you can literally be what, say millimeters depending on your shoe, from a minimum 130 degree temperature surface and claim you won't feel that in any way? Try cooking something on the stove top, the water won't be touching the fire, but it'll eventually boil. Fire heats the stove, which heats up the pot, which will boil the water. Sun heats up the surface, surface heats up whatever it touches due to physics (like your shoe) and your shoe will heat up your sock, and then it will heat up your feet. Heat transfers through touching objects until it reaches equilibrium.

What I am saying is taking a temperature seven stories high or so (not entirely sure how tall the ATC tower is) will not be as accurate as ground-level surface temperatures. We don't live and function at the height of the ATC tower in open air unless you are in construction sometimes you will or my job working a zipline. Heat is not evenly distributed, which is why if I went a couple miles up in the sky right now from here in Tucson there may even be a bit of frost, but no sign of frost in Tucson at all at ground level. It's why Mount Lemmon CAN get snow in the winter and Tucson can't. Hot air rises as cold air is denser, but except for the rare condition of inversions (see SLC) you will never see the opposite happen at our ground level.

The temperatures recorded at Sky Harbor are fairly reliable, but I always add a couple degrees or so to make up for this variable. Unless again, you are in the middle of no where.
You act like I don't know about adiabatic lapse rates. My point was that the 130° pavement will not radiate THAT much heat up to the 3-6 ft level where people's upper bodies are when they are out and about. People don't slide along the ground last I checked
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Old 11-01-2016, 06:29 AM
 
3,792 posts, read 3,022,346 times
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Ontario seems to practically be a part of Metro LA (if you need to work there or want to have fun or a day, short drive to Pomona, relaxing 1 hr train ride to Union Station. The hiking in the area is phenomenal. I'll take IE, so long as I can handle the additional COL. Especially if one lived in the Woodlands. It's shorter to get to an Angels, Ducks, UCLA game, Disney, etc. from Ontario than it is to get to Houston from Woodlands, or at least it appears that way. Also, Pacific Ocean closer to Ontario than Gulf to North Houston, so I'd have to think only legit question here is COL difference.
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