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View Poll Results: Do you find the Rust Belt cities interesting?
Yes 53 79.10%
No 14 20.90%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-20-2008, 09:45 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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I've never been to most rustbelt cities but I do find them interesting, particularly Detroit. This may sound weird but I've always wanted to visit Detroit and just see what its like. It's so hard for me to imagine a city that has lost 1 million+ people and is filled with so many abandoned buildings. CA is always constantly growing so you don't have large sections of a city that is abandoned like you do in Detroit and other rust belt cities. And it's not just abandoned housing but large commercial buildings too. It's too bad the state of many of these cities b/c they seem to have such nice, old architecture not found on the west coast.
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Old 10-20-2008, 09:59 PM
 
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i take it more than a few of you haven't grew up in the rust-belt mess?

FWIW, rusty cities are really interesting and historic, but depressing is more of the word that strikes me. it's not a good situation in these cities.
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Old 10-21-2008, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,661,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillside View Post
FWIW, rusty cities are really interesting and historic, but depressing is more of the word that strikes me. it's not a good situation in these cities.
It's all in how you look at it. It's a little sad sometimes when we finally lose a building to the wrecking ball that could have been great/was once great. But overall, I see potential. With age and wear comes character.
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Old 10-21-2008, 08:18 AM
 
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Yes, I find them interesting. Mainly because they are laboratories for how misguided government policies can take vital prosperous cities and turn them into deteriorating, hopeless hellholes.

I moved South fifteen years ago, and I thought that I was about to go live on the freaking frontier. Now, the Southeast is pretty much cleaning the Rust Belt's clock in just about every imaginable category regarding quality of life. Even in the much vaunted Household Income category (which doesn't take into account average tax burden), the South has almost caught up.

Fifteen years ago, my friends all laughed when we moved South. Now, I get a call at least once every two weeks from somebody who is eyeing the exits because all opportunity is evaporating up there.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,429,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillside View Post
i take it more than a few of you haven't grew up in the rust-belt mess?

FWIW, rusty cities are really interesting and historic, but depressing is more of the word that strikes me. it's not a good situation in these cities.
Whats depressing to me is ugly, endless, cookie cutter homes, look-alike box stores and people, and boring architecture found elsewhere.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,429,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Yes, I find them interesting. Mainly because they are laboratories for how misguided government policies can take vital prosperous cities and turn them into deteriorating, hopeless hellholes.

I moved South fifteen years ago, and I thought that I was about to go live on the freaking frontier. Now, the Southeast is pretty much cleaning the Rust Belt's clock in just about every imaginable category regarding quality of life. Even in the much vaunted Household Income category (which doesn't take into account average tax burden), the South has almost caught up.

Fifteen years ago, my friends all laughed when we moved South. Now, I get a call at least once every two weeks from somebody who is eyeing the exits because all opportunity is evaporating up there.

What a joke. Youre referring to only certain rust belt cities and comparing them to booming southeastern cities. Thats real fair. Let me compare Chicago or NYC to, say, Redneckville, Arkansas. Fact is that many rust belt cities are struggling, but so are many southern cities (I lived down south and it is soooooo poor in areas that its scary). If you want to go about bragging about the SE's big cities, Ill play Chicago and NYC against ANYTHING you got. Just let me know when.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:17 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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The rustbelt cities to me are very interesting. Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh are all culturally rich and historically rich. I love these cities.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:34 AM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,750,956 times
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Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
What a joke. Youre referring to only certain rust belt cities and comparing them to booming southeastern cities. Thats real fair. Let me compare Chicago or NYC to, say, Redneckville, Arkansas. Fact is that many rust belt cities are struggling, but so are many southern cities (I lived down south and it is soooooo poor in areas that its scary). If you want to go about bragging about the SE's big cities, Ill play Chicago and NYC against ANYTHING you got. Just let me know when.
Hey. Former Chicago guy here. Also Cleveland.

The problem with your post is that you're comparing Chicago to Redneckvile, Arkansas, when you really need to be comparing apples to apples: Youngstown, Ohio, to Huntsville, Alabama, or Cleveland, Ohio, to Charlotte, North Carolina. It's those comparisons that make my point. Better yet, ask anybody in commercial real estate in both regions. In the south, they keep building new stuff to keep up with the economic growth of the region. In the Rust Belt, there's zero demand and a lot of empty inventory on the ground.

Having family in backwoods Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois, I can tell you right now that rural poverty is everywhere. But even here, the smaller towns are improving markedly, while my in-laws in the rural midwest are watching jobs and opportunities vanish into thin air.
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Old 10-21-2008, 10:50 AM
 
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I think a lot of people see the Midwest as "rustbelt", which it might have been on the road to during the 70's and 80's, but has turned around for a large portion of the region. Detroit, Cleveland, Youngstown, Buffalo, Gary, Toledo. These cities are the ones that had issues back in the 70's and 80's, and still have issues today.

Cities like Chicago, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, Des Moines, St. Louis, Kansas City, Indianapolis. These cities had "issues" during the 70's and 80's, some only small blips, some to the point the city really had to wake up and force itself back together. Pittsburgh is probalby one of the cities that has brought itself back and re-tooled very successfully. Chicago and Milwaukee were on the verge of following Detroit, but started to turn themselves around in the early 90's, and for one personal reason or another were able to avoid such a fate. Places like Kansas City and Indianapolis haven't really seen too many problems, but the 70's and 80's saw their growth slow and their inner city areas decline. They're both doing fine today. St. Louis would be another that really faded, but has for the most part put itself back together again. The city might still be slowly losing population or gradually growing, but it's only 12% of the total metro. It's hard to put cities in the south which have boundries that are hundreds and hundreds of square miles of newer sprawl in the same category as a city such as St. Louis, with 60 square miles of tight urban areas. Lets circle the "worst" 10% of Houston and compare. I think it would be less severe. Likewise lets add 540 miles of St. Louis' suburbs to the city and compare that to the 600 square mile City of Houston.

I think the "rust belt" is becoming a little outdated to describe this entire region, and is more accurate to describe a few select local economies that are doing poorly. There are many areas of the region that pulled through just fine, and while they might not be booming, they aren't "dying" by any means.
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Old 10-21-2008, 10:56 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,908,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I think a lot of people see the Midwest as "rustbelt", which it might have been on the road to during the 70's and 80's, but has turned around for a large portion of the region. Detroit, Cleveland, Youngstown, Buffalo, Gary, Toledo. These cities are the ones that had issues back in the 70's and 80's, and still have issues today.

Cities like Chicago, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, Des Moines, St. Louis, Kansas City, Indianapolis. These cities had "issues" during the 70's and 80's, some only small blips, some to the point the city really had to wake up and force itself back together. Pittsburgh is probalby one of the cities that has brought itself back and re-tooled very successfully. Chicago and Milwaukee were on the verge of following Detroit, but started to turn themselves around in the early 90's, and for one personal reason or another were able to avoid such a fate. Places like Kansas City and Indianapolis haven't really seen too many problems, but the 70's and 80's saw their growth slow and their inner city areas decline. They're both doing fine today. St. Louis would be another that really faded, but has for the most part put itself back together again. The city might still be slowly losing population or gradually growing, but it's only 12% of the total metro. It's hard to put cities in the south which have boundries that are hundreds and hundreds of square miles of newer sprawl in the same category as a city such as St. Louis, with 60 square miles of tight urban areas. Lets circle the "worst" 10% of Houston and compare. I think it would be less severe. Likewise lets add 540 miles of St. Louis' suburbs to the city and compare that to the 600 square mile City of Houston.

I think the "rust belt" is becoming a little outdated to describe this entire region, and is more accurate to describe a few select local economies that are doing poorly. There are many areas of the region that pulled through just fine, and while they might not be booming, they aren't "dying" by any means.
Did Minneapolis/St. Paul ever experience a similar trend to the other Midwestern/Northeastern cities you've mentioned?
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