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View Poll Results: Do you find the Rust Belt cities interesting?
Yes 53 79.10%
No 14 20.90%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-21-2008, 11:06 AM
 
1,071 posts, read 4,020,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Whats depressing to me is ugly, endless, cookie cutter homes, look-alike box stores and people, and boring architecture found elsewhere.
i hear you. some burbs aren't much more than a waste of perfectly good land.
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Old 10-21-2008, 12:58 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,759,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Did Minneapolis/St. Paul ever experience a similar trend to the other Midwestern/Northeastern cities you've mentioned?
Minneapolis is unique among Midwestern cities. It used to be the Milling here was what rubber was for Akron. The difference is that Mpls. diversified its industry was never had a large influx of Southern blacks. It means that the economy is perenially stable. It got pretty rough here in the 1980s, but we weathered it pretty well. Now it is to the point where the city has never looked so go in my lifetime. The population is lower now than it was at the peak of opulation, but that has more to do with smaller family sizes and the demolition of some blocks for freeways.
The real reason why most midwestern cities look like they do is racial strife. Think about it. They all lost industry. As a metropolitan area, though, even Cleveland and Detroit are doing fairly well. Economically depressed, but not in a state of physical decay. The difference is that the inner-cities in these metros were left for poors and blacks and the resources went to suburban areas.
In 1950, Minneapolis was 95% white. It is still one of the whitest large cities in America. Generally speaking, most blacks here today more or less came by way of cities like Chgo., Milw. and Det., and even then they never came in great numbers. Now Mpls. was pretty racist, and blacks were barred from purchasing homes anywhere but in the Near Northside of the city. This area took a hard hit, and is still a problem area. If you look at Google maps for Plymouth Avenue, you can see the area of Mpls. that was lost after some small-scale riots in '67. The rest of the city remained relatively stable, so Mpls. had more tax money to take care of its problems with. North Mpls. is weird in that houses are usually rehabbed before they would have been demolished in other cities, commercial areas are rebuilt if they are torn down. There is enough money and support here to prevent the civic embarassment of an urban prairie.
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Old 10-21-2008, 01:02 PM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,388,331 times
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^ actually the economy of metro Detroit is doing very poorly right now. Cleveland isn't doing as bad, but so much of Detroit revolves around the car. My friend was talking to his best friend from high school who owns a parts company for the industry. He said the entire region is reeling right now.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
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I'm originally from Michigan, and while the economy is hurting due to the auto industry decline, it really isn't that different from Anywhere, USA. Most areas don't consist of rows of abandoned buildings - it's the same development, chain stores and restaurants, etc. that exists everywhere. So outside of a few exceptions, the Rust Belt will feel quite... um... normal.
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Old 10-21-2008, 11:21 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,759,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
^ actually the economy of metro Detroit is doing very poorly right now. Cleveland isn't doing as bad, but so much of Detroit revolves around the car. My friend was talking to his best friend from high school who owns a parts company for the industry. He said the entire region is reeling right now.
Detroit has the worst economy of any American metropolitan region; yet it still doesn't account for the scale of disinvestment and decay in the City of Detroit. Poor people and the unemployed don't burn down their houses the night before Halloween. Disillusioned young minorities who are the victims of generational segregration burn down houses the night before Halloween.
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Old 10-22-2008, 04:30 PM
 
1,071 posts, read 4,020,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
Detroit has the worst economy of any American metropolitan region; yet it still doesn't account for the scale of disinvestment and decay in the City of Detroit. Poor people and the unemployed don't burn down their houses the night before Halloween. Disillusioned young minorities who are the victims of generational segregration burn down houses the night before Halloween.
detroit's shot-callers did a lot to kill the city as well. sometimes you just wonder what detroit was thinking in 1946 and '69 and all points in between.
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Old 10-22-2008, 04:37 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,204,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCop View Post
I'd like to move into one of these places for maybe a year after college to experience urban reality.
By then I'd be suprised if you hadn't experienced PLENTY of urban reality in the bustling metropolises of Westchester County and Chestnut Hill, you big urban New Yorker, you.
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Old 10-22-2008, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs,CO
2,368 posts, read 6,832,073 times
Reputation: 624
I think the rust belt is very interesting.You really can't beat the older architecture in the Midwest and Northeast cities.And alot of the cities in the rust belt that are decayed and crime filled are probably eventually going to make come backs,because they are set up for densely populated neighborhoods and the rust belt is by the great lakes so it makes sense to invest in those cities.
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Old 10-22-2008, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,528 posts, read 5,715,838 times
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I think most cities are interesting... but yeah...
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Old 10-23-2008, 01:17 AM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,759,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillside View Post
detroit's shot-callers did a lot to kill the city as well. sometimes you just wonder what detroit was thinking in 1946 and '69 and all points in between.
They had a good part to do with it. It was the everyday person that pulled the trigger, though. If there are any Detroiters in their twenties here, there is a good chance that your Grandparents are the reason why your city is the way it is. Was a self-fufilling prophecy, really.
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