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Old 12-30-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,970,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
I heard Wilmington bad areas in Delware is like North Philly.
Yes, unfortunately, we do have some very bad areas--enough to earn us the moniker of "Murder Town USA" by Newsweek. And a lot of that is drug dealing spillover from Philadelphia and Baltimore, as Wilmington can be viewed as an "easier" place to hustle.
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Old 12-30-2015, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,674 posts, read 8,185,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Yes, unfortunately, we do have some very bad areas--enough to earn us the moniker of "Murder Town USA" by Newsweek. And a lot of that is drug dealing spillover from Philadelphia and Baltimore, as Wilmington can be viewed as an "easier" place to hustle.
Do you think Wilmington will change ?
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Old 12-30-2015, 01:45 PM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,137,316 times
Reputation: 1850
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Just would like the note the estimation for North Dakota, 2030 in 2008 was 605,000.
The actual population of North Dakota, 2015, is 756,000.
Yep, they certainly didn't anticipate the oil boom
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Old 12-31-2015, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,426 posts, read 1,882,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoninATX View Post
36 million maybe a tad bit high for Texas in 2030. I'm predicting somewhere between 32- 34 million.
What's crazy is that the majority of the growth will be withing the Texas triangle, which is expected to have 70% to 80% of all of Texas' population. I think this makes the third largest contiguous urban region after the Northeast and Southern California. Or it will be.

By contiguous, I mean with little to none major interruption of the built environment. I've never driven between the major metros that make the Texas triangle, but from google maps, it looks like there are still large swaths between the metros that aren't built out. For ex, in SoCal you can take the 101 from Ventura, which connects to the 5 in LA, all the way down to the Mexican border (Chula Vista/San Diego), without any major interruption to the urban environment, with the obvious exception of Camp Pendleton on the coastal side (not true if you go through the IE via the 15).

Because of the lack of apparent natural barriers to growth in Texas (like the multiple mountain ranges and the Pacific in SoCal), this might not necessarily ever happen there. Unless, of course, Texas sets up some type of imagined barrier that promotes growth along this corrider, instead of just sprawling out into the abyss. Doesn't seem like a growth policy the state of Texas would adapt though.
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Old 12-31-2015, 09:31 AM
 
9,378 posts, read 9,534,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
What's crazy is that the majority of the growth will be withing the Texas triangle, which is expected to have 70% to 80% of all of Texas' population. I think this makes the third largest contiguous urban region after the Northeast and Southern California. Or it will be.

By contiguous, I mean with little to none major interruption of the built environment. I've never driven between the major metros that make the Texas triangle, but from google maps, it looks like there are still large swaths between the metros that aren't built out. For ex, in SoCal you can take the 101 from Ventura, which connects to the 5 in LA, all the way down to the Mexican border (Chula Vista/San Diego), without any major interruption to the urban environment, with the obvious exception of Camp Pendleton on the coastal side (not true if you go through the IE via the 15).

Because of the lack of apparent natural barriers to growth in Texas (like the multiple mountain ranges and the Pacific in SoCal), this might not necessarily ever happen there. Unless, of course, Texas sets up some type of imagined barrier that promotes growth along this corrider, instead of just sprawling out into the abyss. Doesn't seem like a growth policy the state of Texas would adapt though.
Even the Bos-Wash is not continuous. Eastern CT and Central/Western MA is a good 35-40 mile break in urban/suburban development.
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Old 12-31-2015, 04:27 PM
 
218 posts, read 228,313 times
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Sooo between 2015 and 2030 , Pennsylvania would supposedly slightly lose population, while Illinois will continue to grow faster then it has anytime after 1990 i think not try again.... Pennsylvania is the fastest growing state in the Northeast, largely because its much cheaper and has a lower cost of living when compared to surrounding Northeast states like NY, NJ, and Maryland , and its one of the fastest outside the Sunbelt. Most of its growth is from the NYC/NJ and DC/Baltimore areas into the eastern and south-central sections of the state. Basically if you were to draw a line between Adams county and Wayne county, everything southeast of that line is where the 95% of Pennsylvania's growth is. The other 5% is probably State College, Erie , and the Pittsburgh area.
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Old 12-31-2015, 10:57 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phillydominican View Post
Sooo between 2015 and 2030 , Pennsylvania would supposedly slightly lose population, while Illinois will continue to grow faster then it has anytime after 1990 i think not try again.... Pennsylvania is the fastest growing state in the Northeast, largely because its much cheaper and has a lower cost of living when compared to surrounding Northeast states like NY, NJ, and Maryland , and its one of the fastest outside the Sunbelt. Most of its growth is from the NYC/NJ and DC/Baltimore areas into the eastern and south-central sections of the state. Basically if you were to draw a line between Adams county and Wayne county, everything southeast of that line is where the 95% of Pennsylvania's growth is. The other 5% is probably State College, Erie , and the Pittsburgh area.
No, Pennsylvania isn't the fastest-growing state in the Northeast. It has a dangerously low rate of natural growth (births minus deaths), and it doesn't get as many foreign immigrants as New York or New Jersey.

Be that as it may, Pennsylvania's population growth has been continuously underestimated for the last 25 years, so I seriously doubt that its population will be flat between now and 2030.
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Old 01-01-2016, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,534 posts, read 3,686,922 times
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As we can see, these projections are just a snapshot in time. That snapshot can easily change. Especially since the data from the OP was from 2000, and originally posted in 2008.

I would like to see some newer projections, but don't know how often they are released. There should be data from 2010 on this, maybe even 2015.
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Old 01-04-2016, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,790 posts, read 6,519,042 times
Reputation: 1544
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Here are the Census Bureau's Population Projections from 2000 forecasting the population by 2030.

2030
USA 363,584,435

Regions 2030
Northeast 66,139,391
Midwest 70,497,298
South 134,801,014
West 92,146,732

States 2030
California 46,444,861
Texas 33,317,744
Florida 28,685,769
New York 19,477,429
Illinois 13,432,892
Pennsylvania 12,768,184
North Carolina 12,227,739
Georgia 12,017,838
Ohio 11,550,528
Arizona 10,712,397
Michigan 10,694,172
Virginia 9,825,019
New Jersey 9,802,440
Washington 8,624,801
Tennessee 7,380,634
Massachusetts 7,012,009
Maryland 7,022,251
Indiana 6,810,108
Missouri 6,430,173
Minnesota 6,306,130
Wisconsin 6,150,764
Colorado 5,792,357
South Carolina 5,148,569
Alabama 4,874,243
Oregon 4,833,918
Louisiana 4,802,633
Kentucky 4,554,998
Nevada 4,282,102
Oklahoma 3,913,251
Connecticut 3,688,630
Utah 3,485,367
Arkansas 3,240,208
Mississippi 3,092,410
Kansas 2,940,084
New Mexico 2,099,708
Idaho 1,969,624
Nebraska 1,820,247
West Virginia 1,719,959
New Hampshire 1,646,471
Hawaii 1,466,046
Maine 1,411,097
Rhode Island 1,152,941
Montana 1,044,898
Delaware 1,012,658
Alaska 867,861
South Dakota 800,462
Vermont 711,867
North Dakota 606,566
Wyoming 522,979
District of Columbia 433,414
I know this is old but Alabama already has over 4.8 million and we have 14 more years to go.
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