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View Poll Results: How do you say "milk"?
"Milk", rhymes with "silk" or "ilk" 322 85.41%
"Melk", rhymes with "elk" 49 13.00%
Other 6 1.59%
Voters: 377. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-05-2014, 07:00 PM
 
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I pronounce milk with two L's...like "Millk" but the last L is silent
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,180 posts, read 54,646,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
Oh, come on! You know NY/NJ is authority and EVERYONE else is wrong.
Now you're catching on!
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:07 PM
 
1,428 posts, read 1,824,279 times
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Meh wi cook-e
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Now you're catching on!
Not quite... I forgot to add

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Old 01-05-2014, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,180 posts, read 54,646,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
mar·ry verb \ˈmer-ē, ˈma-rē\
Marry - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

mer·ry adjective \ˈmer-ē, ˈme-rē\
Merry - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Mary noun \ˈmer-ē, ˈma-rē, ˈmā-rē\
Mary - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Wow -the same pronunciation for all three words - and the first usage of it (ie, the most common) in the Merriam Webster dictionary! (Mer'-ee-um - LOL).

So - I guess those who say all three words alike aren't "messing up the pronunciation" after all!

By the way -

hairy adjective \ˈher-ē\
Hairy - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

har·ry transitive verb \ˈher-ē, ˈha-rē\
Harry - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary



Say it ain't so!
You must be using that southern edition!
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,180 posts, read 54,646,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
IMHO Harry rhymes with Marry, and Hairy rhymes with Mary.
That doesn't help if the person also pronounces Marry and Mary alike.
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,169,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Would you look at that, there's more than one pronunciation shown for "ferry." Seems the audio pronunciations are a bit different too:

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation - Ferry

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation - Fairy

These recordings sound a little different than how most people say them around here, but even on the Merriam-Webster site you've been pasting all over this thread, there's a difference.
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,180 posts, read 54,646,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Would you look at that, there's more than one pronunciation shown for "ferry." Seems the audio pronunciations are a bit different too:

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation - Ferry

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation - Fairy

These recordings sound a little different than how most people say them around here, but even on the Merriam-Webster site you've been pasting all over this thread, there's a difference.
Thanks! Yes, the audio clearly shows a difference.
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,180 posts, read 54,646,759 times
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Back to the marry/harry v mary/hairy situation. One thing that has me puzzled. Back in early elementary school, I was taught that double consonants after a vowel meant the vowel was short. If you say "marry" with a long A like "mary", were you just not taught that rule because it didn't apply where you live?
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Old 01-05-2014, 09:27 PM
 
49 posts, read 68,825 times
Reputation: 130
I say milk rhymes with silk. I never heard it pronounced any other way.

Born along the Kentucky-Tennessee border, raised in Muncie Indiana, lived in Texas since 1973.
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