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View Poll Results: How do you pronounce "bag"?
The same way as "beg", or virtually the same 17 5.90%
With the same vowel as "bad" or "radical" 239 82.99%
Neither way 32 11.11%
Voters: 288. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-25-2008, 05:41 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,868,107 times
Reputation: 1668

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonrise View Post
I have an accent fetish. I wish you could here me impersonate accents, I'm really good.
Actually, it sounds like you have a 'loathing accents' fetish, and you seem to be making judgments about the character and/or intelligence of the people who have them, which is unfortunate.

I personally like the regional differences in the various accents of English and enjoy listening to other peoples accents.

As far as claiming that this sentence would exist in England, Boston, or Australian regional speech

Quote:
Linder and Leeser jumped into their cah, drove down to the bah and ordered some beeuh and peetzer.
That isn't entirely correct. The 'r' phenomenon you've noticed is called a 'linking r' and is generally only used before vowels, so while "linder" may be correct "leeser" probably wouldn't be. I've thought a bit about this particular speech phenomenon the first time someone made fun of me for saying "I sawr a show the other night" (which is something I'd say) and did a bit of research on the matter.
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Old 10-25-2008, 06:40 PM
 
4,657 posts, read 7,793,730 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
Actually, it sounds like you have a 'loathing accents' fetish, and you seem to be making judgments about the character and/or intelligence of the people who have them, which is unfortunate.

I personally like the regional differences in the various accents of English and enjoy listening to other peoples accents.

As far as claiming that this sentence would exist in England, Boston, or Australian regional speech



That isn't entirely correct. The 'r' phenomenon you've noticed is called a 'linking r' and is generally only used before vowels, so while "linder" may be correct "leeser" probably wouldn't be. I've thought a bit about this particular speech phenomenon the first time someone made fun of me for saying "I sawr a show the other night" (which is something I'd say) and did a bit of research on the matter.
Can you show me one example of this? We simply agree to disagree. Why is it unacceptable to add or spell incorrectly but when mispronunciations become commonplace it's "cute"? There's a right and a wrong way to pronounce words, regardless of where one lives. I know these two sisters, Kayla and Krista from Canada, one of whom was studying in Australia for a year. Here friends kept calling her Krister. She had to repeatedly tell them that there was no "r" on the end of her name, but instead of correcting their mistake they would often tell her that she was pronouncing her "r's" to strongly.
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Old 10-25-2008, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,230 posts, read 11,675,564 times
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I pronounce it with the same vowel as in "bad." I lived in CA for almost 30 years and have lived in TX for the past 30. I think most say it that way.
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Old 10-26-2008, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,954,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Yes Missymom, mine sounds more like yours than just bag like sad. I have been paying attention to my pronunciation and mine sounds a little bit closer to "bayg", but not quite. Something in between bag and bayg.
Yeah that's it hun! Thank you for making it more clear. I am not good at writing out pronunciations
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Old 10-26-2008, 07:47 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,868,107 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonrise View Post
Can you show me one example of this? We simply agree to disagree. Why is it unacceptable to add or spell incorrectly but when mispronunciations become commonplace it's "cute"? There's a right and a wrong way to pronounce words, regardless of where one lives. I know these two sisters, Kayla and Krista from Canada, one of whom was studying in Australia for a year. Here friends kept calling her Krister. She had to repeatedly tell them that there was no "r" on the end of her name, but instead of correcting their mistake they would often tell her that she was pronouncing her "r's" to strongly.
All countries have 'standard dialect' and it is different in all countries. I've done a bit of armchair studying of linguistics as well as taken more than a few formal classes in such and to assert that there is a 'correct' way of speaking goes against all linguistic theory. To suggest that there is a standard dialect that is often used in media does not (however that doesn't necessarily make it 'correct'), however, if you look at the media of the English speaking countries, you will notice that this is changing and regional dialects seem to be more accepted rather than less (specifically in the UK media).

What rubbed me the wrong way about your post was your obvious disgust toward the sounds of accents that vary from Standard US English (given your previous post about how you hate northern midwest and Boston accents), and I just find that unfortunate.
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Old 10-26-2008, 08:17 AM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,751,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonrise View Post
Pronunciations are not suppose to be regional; just because they are doesn't make it right. If you look up a word in the dictionary, it doesn't give you regional pronunciations, it gives you the correct one and possibly an alternate one.
Since you speak for a living, I understand your obsession with pronouncing words properly.
If it makes you happy, television and excessive mobility are watering down our accents dramatically in this country. After traveling around a good bit in the last couple of years, I've noticed that teenagers sound a lot alike from one region to another. I'd rather not see it be this way. Accent is one thing that distinguishes one part of the country to another. Now, not only are we starting to sound the same, our retail districts are becoming identical. Find a Wal-Mart in any given place from coast to coast, and you'll find plenty of familiarity.

How boring can we be?

I don't understand how pronunciations aren't supposed to be regional, nor do I see how they should not exist. People come by them quite naturally, in spite of schooling. Ethnic background and regional climate play a huge part in how we speak. Schooling does succeed in helping us to understand each other as we speak, even though we may sound different.
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Old 10-26-2008, 09:07 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,868,107 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
Since you speak for a living, I understand your obsession with pronouncing words properly.
If it makes you happy, television and excessive mobility are watering down our accents dramatically in this country. After traveling around a good bit in the last couple of years, I've noticed that teenagers sound a lot alike from one region to another. I'd rather not see it be this way. Accent is one thing that distinguishes one part of the country to another. Now, not only are we starting to sound the same, our retail districts are becoming identical. Find a Wal-Mart in any given place from coast to coast, and you'll find plenty of familiarity.

How boring can we be?

I don't understand how pronunciations aren't supposed to be regional, nor do I see how they should not exist. People come by them quite naturally, in spite of schooling. Ethnic background and regional climate play a huge part in how we speak. Schooling does succeed in helping us to understand each other as we speak, even though we may sound different.
Actually, research has shown that accents are not dying out as a whole, but some are and others are becoming stronger.

That being said, it does seem like a lot of teenagers have a bit of a 'universal teenager accent', but that seems to fade as one gets older and more settled into their life wherever it is that they end up living. I have a cousin in Boston who had a bit of what I would call 'universal teenage accent' mixed in with her Boston accent when she was younger. Now, ten years later, you know exactly where she is from the moment she opens her mouth, and a lot of her 'teenageisms' are gone. I work with a lot of younger college students for a living from all over the country, and I can assure you, regional dialects are not dead yet, I hear them all (I just had a young man in my office last week who was sounded so Brooklyn I thought he was putting it on, and when he left, I looked up his records and sure enough, he was born in, graduated from HS and went to junior college in, you guessed it, Brooklyn).
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Old 10-26-2008, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,569,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonrise View Post

Without a doubt thought the worst is the Cleveland/Chicago (Great Lakes) accent. It's so nasally and whiny. SNL even did a skit about it years ago, it was called Pate and Patteys Bake Pake Shake:

Come down to Pate and Patteys Bake Pake Shake, we've got all kinds of bake pakes, nape sakes and haind begs.
We don't sound like that. "Baiyg" is a Minnesota/Wisconsin thing ONLY. No one in Michigan says that or has that accent. We say bag. And, as far as the Great Lakes "accent" goes, it's not as extreme as SNL would have you believe. To me, people from outside Michigan/Great Lakes sound flat and accented. A's sound like O's (accent=occent, class=closs). It's all relative.
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Old 09-18-2009, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Madison, WI
46 posts, read 129,002 times
Reputation: 29
Long 'A'. bAg.

I'm from Wisconsin - and whenever I say it like I do out-of-state, I get looked at like I'm from another planet.

But it is a DIFFERENT vowel than then one in "beg". People would ask me "you want to beg for something?" I can easily distinguish when people from home say "I was begging for a bag."

It's cool though, instantly I can tell if someone is from Chicago (here at school at least) if they pronounce it like the A in 'bad'.
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Old 09-18-2009, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,888,070 times
Reputation: 1701
Depends on how you pronounce "beg"... Do you pronounce it bayg or beh-g (like the e in set)? I rarely hear people say "bayg" for bag. I also rarely hear people say "bayg" for beg, but "bayg" for bag is more common for sure. Bag rhymes with hag, lag, etc. Beg rhymes with keg and peg, but NOT egg or leg which rhyme with Hague and vague...

I'm from the Northwest.
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