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Old 10-25-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Louisiana
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Some pronunciations of cities in Louisiana

Lecompte is Le-count
Natchitoches is nakuhtish
Iowa, Louisiana is I-oh-WAY.
Lafayette is laugh-ee-ette
Monroe is frequently pronounced MUN-ro with the accent on the first syllable.
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Old 10-25-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: USA
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Here is another one. I don't know where the differences in pronounciation arise, (for areas with seeming close proximity) but in northeastern Louiaiana and probably elsewhere, for towns and cities ending with a "ville", people tend to accent the first syllable and say the last syllable without an accent such as Louisv'l, Nashv'l, Rayv'l, Farmerv'l (the last 2 places being little podunk towns in La). 100 miles over where I live in Shreveport you don't hear that. We have a small unincorporated area known as Keithville which is pronounced "Keith ville", not Keithv'l. Funny how accents and pronunciations modify as one travels a short distance.

Last edited by hdwell; 10-25-2008 at 11:39 AM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 10-25-2008, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Lafayette is perhaps the most varied. Outside the South, it is LAH-fi-YET. In Louisiana, LAUGH-i-yet. In Florida, la-FEET. In Arkansas and Mississippi, la-FAY-it.

One place name is pronounced differently by locals depending on its use. New Orleans is variations 0n the the famous "nollins". bit the city is located in Olleans Parish, which is pronounced "OAR-LEENZ parish"

Here in the Texas coastal bend, there are a few. San Antonio is in Bexar County = BARE. Nolan Ryan/s birthplace, Refugio, changes the G to an R = ru-FEAR-i-o. Palacios rhymes with "galoshes". Confusion can arise with Burnet and Boerne, which are not far apart in geography nor pronunciation. Burnet = BURN-it, and Boerne = BURN-ee.

Last edited by jtur88; 10-25-2008 at 11:44 AM..
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Old 10-25-2008, 11:53 AM
 
Location: USA
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Here is something else I notice. The name Claiborne around these parts is pronounced "Clayburn" not "Clayborn". But on the weather channel and probably most other places, people use the second pronunciation. Claiborne is the name of a parish (county) on the Arkansas border in Louisiana. Watch your speed there; the sheriff loves ticket revenue.

And finally, there is a street in Shreveport named Jordan. Here it's pronounced "Jer dn" and anyone with the surname Jordan is pronounced likewise. Never have I heard this pronunciation elsewhere .
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Old 10-25-2008, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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The Weather Channel has a style book of all county pronunciations and probably cities, too, and I wish I could get my hands on it. I think it is very accurate---I've heard a few that surprised me and they turned out to be correct. (one I herd there was Obion TN = o-BYE-un).
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Old 10-25-2008, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Here are a few more counties that are proununced differently in different states:
Beaufort: BOE-fert in NC, BYOU-fert in SC
Coos: ko-AHSS in NH, rhymes with goose in OR
DeKalb: de-COBB in GA, de-KALB in IL, de-CAB in AL and MO
Steuben: STOO-bin in NY, stoo-BENN in IN.

I made a webpage a long time ago with county pronunciations, at http://webspawner.com/users/u389/
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Old 10-25-2008, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes +
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
What do you mean with hard G?
Like the sound of J in jam?
No that's a soft G. OraGIN
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Old 10-25-2008, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
505 posts, read 1,241,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
It isn't *that* odd. Most of the "difficult" town pronunciations in New England are actually names of places in England (or Native American words). I actually made a list in a similar thread on this topic, so I'll repost that here:


Worcester, MA - pronounced "WUSS-tuh" (the vowel in "wuss" is the same vowel in "book" - although some people Bostonians say WISS-tah, I think)
Gloucester, MA - GLAWSS-tuh
Leominster, MA - LEM-in-stuh
Concord (MA and NH) - KAWNK-id
Pawtucket, RI - Puh-TUCK-it
Quincy, MA - KWIN-zee
Woburn, MA - WOO-bin
Peabody, MA - PEE-b'dee
Reading, MA - RED-ing
Dracut, MA - DRAY-kit
Leicester, MA - LESS-tuh
Haverhill, MA - HAYV-rill
Scituate, MA - SITCH-oo-it
Natick, MA - NAYD-ik
Nashua, NH - NASH-oo-uh
Plaistow, NH - PLASS-tau (rhymes with "cow")
Lowell, MA - LOW-ull
Methuen, MA - Meh-THOO-in
Pembroke (MA or NH) - PEM-brook
Stoughton, MA - STOAT-in
Billerica, MA - Bill-RICK-ah
Damariscotta, ME - Dam-riss-SCAW-duh
Bangor, ME - BANG-gore or BANG-gaw
Bar Harbor, ME - appropriately pronounced "Bah HAH-bah"

There's also a little town near where I live in NH called Sanbornton, which is correctly pronounced "SAN-buh-tin"

Of course, some times it's a little trickier. For example the suffix -ham, which takes on a different pronunciation depending on what town you're talking about (in Massachusetts alone!). For example:

Needham, MA - NEED-um
Framingham, MA - FRAY-ming-ham

In fact, when the ending is 'tham', this suffix can be pronounced in four different ways:

Eastham, MA - EAST-ham
Chatham, MA - CHAD-um
Waltham, MA - WALL-tham
Wrentham, MA - REN-thum

And a few more:

Coos County, NH - first word is pronounced "KO-awss" (sometimes written Coös)
Lake Winnipesaukee, NH - win-uh-puh-SAW-kee
I just wanted to point out that I am a local and I and many others do pronounce the "r" on the end of these places. For example, I say Worcester as "Wuss-ter" not "Wuss-tah." Same goes for Gloucester, Leominster, etc. Other than that, I agree with the list.
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Old 10-25-2008, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dem3456 View Post
I just wanted to point out that I am a local and I and many others do pronounce the "r" on the end of these places. For example, I say Worcester as "Wuss-ter" not "Wuss-tah." Same goes for Gloucester, Leominster, etc. Other than that, I agree with the list.
There will always be local variations in the way local people pronounce everything (New Jersey/New Joizey) which then carries over to the names of places, too. But a local pronunciation "defect" does not necessarily say that the name of a place is pronounced differently. A person who says "Gaddna Mackit" is pronouncing Gardner the same as a person who says "Gardner Market" but with more of a Bostonian accent. I remember people from the old country who still said Mil-VOCK-kee.

Have you noticed how actors in movies in the 30's and 40's said "Los Anga-leez"? They would take the arrow-plane to Los Anga-leez. I think Art Linkletter was the last person I heard say LA that way. And now, it is entering its third form in a century, as increasingly bilingual news reporters are starting to say "loce ON-hay-lace"
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Old 10-25-2008, 03:25 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 7,094,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dem3456 View Post
I just wanted to point out that I am a local and I and many others do pronounce the "r" on the end of these places. For example, I say Worcester as "Wuss-ter" not "Wuss-tah." Same goes for Gloucester, Leominster, etc. Other than that, I agree with the list.
Yeah, I know that not everyone drops the r. But I was trying to give the most "authentic" or "traditional" local pronunciation.
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