U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-07-2019, 01:52 PM
 
7,447 posts, read 4,635,186 times
Reputation: 19411

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Have you noticed how actors in movies in the 30's and 40's said "Los Anga-leez"? They would take the arrow-plane to Los Anga-leez. I think Art Linkletter was the last person I heard say LA that way. And now, it is entering its third form in a century, as increasingly bilingual news reporters are starting to say "loce ON-hay-lace"
Many Brits still say "los-anja-leez." But Los Angeles will never become "loce ON-hay-lace" among American English speakers, no worries there.

Actually, the local pronunciations of Spanish place-names in California can be an odd mix of English "spelling pronunciations" (what a monolingual English-speaker might assume by looking at them) and the original Spanish pronunciations.

We can usually tell tourists and transplants because they err one way or the other, either too English or too Spanish. For example, there's a Canadian broadcaster on our local news who says San Clemente as "San Cle-men-tay." It's actually "San cle-Menty."

La Jolla is "La Hoy-uh," which is not by any means an English treatment of that word, but it's not quite Spanish, either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-07-2019, 01:58 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 35,939,226 times
Reputation: 15432
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
La Jolla is "La Hoy-uh," which is not by any means an English treatment of that word, but it's not quite Spanish, either.
Sounds Spanish to me; 'J' pronounced like a 'H', double 'L' pronounced like a 'Y'.
How would you pronounce it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 03:33 PM
 
7,447 posts, read 4,635,186 times
Reputation: 19411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Sounds Spanish to me; 'J' pronounced like a 'H', double 'L' pronounced like a 'Y'.
How would you pronounce it?
You want to get technical? The Spanish letter J is more guttural than English H (in IPA, it's represented by the letter X).

Double L is sometimes pronounced like Y, sometimes more like English J or ZH, and the Spanish vowels are pure /a/ and /o/. "Ho-ya," not "hoy-uh." "Hoy-uh" is just an anglicized approximation. The point I am making is that if an English-speaking person made a point of saying La Jolla the Spanish way, /la'xoja/, instead of the usual English pronunciation /lə'hɔɪə/, it would sound as strange and pretentious as "loce ON-hay-lace" for Los Angeles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,182 posts, read 1,516,420 times
Reputation: 1629
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
You want to get technical? The Spanish letter J is more guttural than English H (in IPA, it's represented by the letter X).

Double L is sometimes pronounced like Y, sometimes more like English J or ZH, and the Spanish vowels are pure /a/ and /o/. "Ho-ya," not "hoy-uh." "Hoy-uh" is just an anglicized approximation. The point I am making is that if an English-speaking person made a point of saying La Jolla the Spanish way, /la'xoja/, instead of the usual English pronunciation /lə'hɔɪə/, it would sound as strange and pretentious as "loce ON-hay-lace" for Los Angeles.

The Spanish "j" or "x" is a lot like the Scottish "loch". Or the Hebrew pronunciation of Chanukah.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 07:13 PM
 
59,336 posts, read 84,129,768 times
Reputation: 13032
Chaumont(sha-mo), Olean(o-lee-an), Watervliet(water-vleet) and Schuyler(sky-ler) in NY. Tchula(chew-la) MS; Ypsilanti(ip-sil-an-ti), Dowagiac(de-was-gee-ac) and Okemos(oh-ki-mus) in MI and Martinez(mar-tin-ez) GA come to mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
3,155 posts, read 1,456,572 times
Reputation: 7416
Skaneateles (skinny-atlas)

Worchester (wuhster)

Sault Ste Marie (Soo Saint Marie)

Mackinac (Mackinaw)

Duquesne (doo-kane)

Reading (red-ding)

Chateaugay (SHAT-o-gay)

Coxsackie (Cook-SACK-ie)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 09:20 PM
 
5,935 posts, read 14,289,025 times
Reputation: 3613
Then there's Rochester, where the neighborhood of Charlotte is pronounced "Sha-LOT" .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,560 posts, read 16,498,391 times
Reputation: 5788
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Then there's Rochester, where the neighborhood of Charlotte is pronounced "Sha-LOT" .
I believe Charlotte, VT is pronounced the same way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2019, 11:13 PM
 
59,336 posts, read 84,129,768 times
Reputation: 13032
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
I believe Charlotte, VT is pronounced the same way.
Same with Charlotte MI.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2019, 08:01 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 35,939,226 times
Reputation: 15432
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
You want to get technical? The Spanish letter J is more guttural than English H (in IPA, it's represented by the letter X).

Double L is sometimes pronounced like Y, sometimes more like English J or ZH, and the Spanish vowels are pure /a/ and /o/. "Ho-ya," not "hoy-uh." "Hoy-uh" is just an anglicized approximation. The point I am making is that if an English-speaking person made a point of saying La Jolla the Spanish way, /la'xoja/, instead of the usual English pronunciation /lə'hɔɪə/, it would sound as strange and pretentious as "loce ON-hay-lace" for Los Angeles.
Actually, no, I didn't want to get technical, especially if it means I have to pronounce La Jolla like I'm getting ready to hock a loogie.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top