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Old 02-20-2007, 11:23 AM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,121,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
North Carolinas' accents are thicker than syrup. That's the dang truth too! Try to imagine someone talking with a sticky substance in his/her mouth and that is a North Carolinan for you.
?
Now, honey, you jes' hush yo mouth, ya' hear an' gimme a lil sugah...... Actually, NC has at least 3-4 different accents - depends where you are and not all of us talk as if we have mush in our mouths.....lol Mark, maybe in Missouri, "y'all" is the singular, and the plural form is "all y'alls", but here in NC, I was told that the fastest way to tell a non-native was their use of "y'all" when speaking of one person v. two or more. I have said "all y'alls" when speaking of several as "Bring all y'alls kids if you want to" - GRAMMAR POLICE!!!!!!!

 
Old 02-20-2007, 04:11 PM
 
18,362 posts, read 23,541,961 times
Reputation: 34427
i think jeff foxworthy, has popularized the term redneck, and i believe its all in good fun, i interpret the term, to be able to laugh at ourselves, with our daily livin...quirks,
lighten up folks, its not what people say, its how you allow others to define you.
actually, the term "redneck" was derived out of the mid 1800's, a deraguratory term for the chinese workers, laying railroad tracks, their necks would get sun-burned!(they wouldnt cover there necks)
 
Old 02-20-2007, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,720,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mm_mary73 View Post
I was told that the fastest way to tell a non-native was their use of "y'all" when speaking of one person v. two or more. I have said "all y'alls" when speaking of several as "Bring all y'alls kids if you want to" - GRAMMAR POLICE!!!!!!!
Is that because say all and y'all is redundant?

I'm familiar with saying "y'all" meaning more than 2 and "y'all's" meaning something more than 2 people have possesion of...
 
Old 02-20-2007, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,720,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
North Carolinas' accents are thicker than syrup. That's the dang truth too! Try to imagine someone talking with a sticky substance in his/her mouth and that is a North Carolinan for you.
Glotal-stops-are-overrated!

My friend from the Triangle Area speaks like this. He says whole senteces, sometimes paragraphs on what seems like a single breath.
 
Old 02-20-2007, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,720,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
I think Virginia and Georgia accents are best.

But my least favorite are Alabama accents. And I mean of offense to anyone from Alabam.

Mississippi- on the other hand flows as smooth as molasses.
I've never heard an Alabama accent in person... but I have heard a few on TV fishing shows and they sounded fine.

I'm most familiar with a Carolina accent, but I'm also familiar with East Tennessee, Virginia mountain and old Florida accents.

The western VA and WV accents seem similar to what I've heard in NC, but maybe that's because I spent a lot of time in Raleigh where everyone is from everywhere nowadays.

If I had to guess, I'd say the accent in Virginia is like the Carolinas but with more glotal stops.

The Florida accents I heard also sounded similar, but I noticed they pronounce long "O's" and "oo" sounds rather flat, like in a Northern accent. I also didn't notice a difference in East TN, but maybe they have flat "O" or "oo" sounds.

In both the Carolina's and Virginia, it seems unusual to pronounce "oo" or long "O" without, for lack of a better word "bending" it to make it sound as one British traveler put it, sounding like they're trying to mock the British Upper Class.
 
Old 02-20-2007, 05:45 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,121,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Glotal-stops-are-overrated!

My friend from the Triangle Area speaks like this. He says whole senteces, sometimes paragraphs on what seems like a single breath.
A-n-d i-t t-a-k-e-s a-n h-o-u-r t-o s-a-y i-t.
 
Old 02-20-2007, 05:48 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,121,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Is that because say all and y'all is redundant?

I'm familiar with saying "y'all" meaning more than 2 and "y'all's" meaning something more than 2 people have possesion of...
No idea, I just have been told that "y'all" means 2 or more. Where I'm from, we said youse or youse guys for 1 or more. .
 
Old 02-20-2007, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,342,200 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
North Carolinas' accents are thicker than syrup. That's the dang truth too! Try to imagine someone talking with a sticky substance in his/her mouth and that is a North Carolinan for you.

On the subject as whether a redneck and a southern go hand in hand, no way! All one needs to do is travel to Michigan in some parts of the state and it'll entirely dismiss the notion.

I couldn't tell you why people think a redneck and a southern are one in the same. Mass media with a sprinkling of ignorance, maybe?

North Carolina has severl different accents associated with it. There is the eastern N.C. accent, which is more like Virginia, and it gets much more noticeable as you go further east. The coastal areas, especially northeastern, are not unlike Cape Cod accents and sometimes are difficult to understand. Western N.C. is completely different and one most people would associate with a redneck sound, probably because more of the western part of the state is rural than urban. The piedmont section of N.C. includes the major metro areas...the Triad, the Triangle and Charlotte. People from the this region don't have a very strong accent in my opinion. Growing up in a city where there are lots of different accents sort of evens things out. So if anything it's a mixture of western and eastern N.C. accents, but not a very noticebaly southern one. Of course this all depends on a couple of factors, like rural vs. urban upbringing, educated vs. uneducated, etc.

I moved from Winston Salem to Atlanta a few years back...it's amazing how much stronger the southern accents are the further south you travel. But again, in and around the city it's not as stated as other areas of Georgia.
 
Old 02-20-2007, 06:02 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,869,909 times
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I just heard a student say 'y'alls' this past weekend (she was visiting from Texas). "yall's' confuses me, isn't y'all supposed to be the second person plural. Of course my coworkers must be friends with mm_mary73, they've been known to use the word 'youse' as well. I, despite having grown up with it, have mostly been able to resist that particular affectation.

however, back to the subject of y'all versus y'alls, well, what is it? I've been hearing more and more students from the south (which are pretty much the only people I meet from the south) use the word 'y'alls'.

...and back to the subject of the thread. Anyone who has been to rural New Hampshire as I have, knows that rednecks are not confined to the south. I've met plenty of rednecks with New England accents and Red Sox bumper stickers on their pick-up trucks

...and don't even get me started on the upper-midwest. hehe.
 
Old 02-20-2007, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,342,200 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm_mary73 View Post
No idea, I just have been told that "y'all" means 2 or more. Where I'm from, we said youse or youse guys for 1 or more. .
Y'all isn't uniquely southern anymore...I've heard it used from New York to London to L.A. It's a contraction of the two words you and all...and just a more efficient way to say you-all or you'ze guys. It seems like people from all over the U.S. have picked it up...
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