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Old 02-22-2007, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,341,930 times
Reputation: 288

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprtsluvr8 View Post
Y'all isn't uniquely southern anymore...I've heard it used from New York to London to L.A. It's a contraction of the two words you and all...and just a more efficient way to say you-all or you'ze guys. It seems like people from all over the U.S. have picked it up...
Oh I'm sorry, I thought you were referring to my post, where I actually stated that the word is a contraction combining you and all (see above).

 
Old 02-22-2007, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,341,930 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightcopperkettles View Post
Actually, kind sir, I was referring to the lady who posted this, marysally, I believe her handle is.

"

I did sound quite a bit like a schoolmarm, didn't I? I was just trying to offer folk not from the South a little explanation, but upon reading these posts again, it seems I missed the humor. I apologize for getting all "preachy" about the subject. :-)
And you didn't even answer the question I asked of you...Did you think I was being sarcastic toward you? I wasn't...and I didn't think you were preachy at all. I was serious when I thanked you for the clarification, and I asked the further question because I thought you sounded knowledgeable about it.
 
Old 02-22-2007, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,124,580 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Strange...

I've met quite a few people from Georgia. A few of them hardly had a southern accent but most of them had no detectable trace of southern accent. (who are coincidentally still familiar with when to say "y'all" and eat grits, biscuits etc.)

I've heard some Georgians that sound southern on TV, like Jeff Foxworthy, but even his accent sounds a little weak compared to most native Carolinians I've met.

Now that I think about it, the comedian "Cletus T. Judd" has a very thick accent; a little stronger than I'm accustomed to. I know he's a native Georgian, but I don't know if that accent is totally authentic.
That's true. I've met people from the deep south and some of them have hardly any drawl at all. Most of them sounded mild. Yet in my native Virginia there are people who sound like Senator Claghorn. I don't have as strong as an accent as my older relatives do , but honestly, I love hearing them talk. With their oots and aboots and cyaw's and gyawdens and I declares!.
 
Old 02-22-2007, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,714,463 times
Reputation: 3505
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaleighRob View Post
And the ironic thing is about three-fourths of the Triangle area is now people from outside of NC, especially the northeast.
Well he's multiple-generation North Carolinian, (don't know how far back) born in the Triangle. I've met most of his relatives, including his grandparents, and all of his family members and his accent, as well as his younger sisters sounds about the same as even their grandparents.

It surprises me a little that those numbers are so high because at one of the places he used to work in Garner in the late 90's, there were a few dozen employees and they pretty much all had the same accent too.

Has the Triangle Area changed significantly since the late 90's?
 
Old 02-22-2007, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,714,463 times
Reputation: 3505
Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
That's true. I've met people from the deep south and some of them have hardly any drawl at all. Most of them sounded mild. Yet in my native Virginia there are people who sound like Senator Claghorn. I don't have as strong as an accent as my older relatives do , but honestly, I love hearing them talk. With their oots and aboots and cyaw's and gyawdens and I declares!.
I never heard of that Senator... But I have heard of Foghorn Leghorn. (the name ryhmed, I love that cartoon rooster, lol)

I too enjoy hearing strong regional accents. I never heard a Tidewater accent but I hope I do someday.
 
Old 02-22-2007, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 23,714,463 times
Reputation: 3505
Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
I am. I had to be otherwise I would have never gotten a word in edgewise with my family.

Between my boston born grandmother and my nyc born grandfather, our large holiday dinners were a loud fast talking affairs, that I'll always remember with fondness (damn I miss them). It isn't something I've ever thought about until I was once told 'hon, you HAVE to slow down'
There are some who talk fast here, some do it all the time but most people don't, unless they're in a big rush. I suppose a lot has to do with how people's families are.

When I was a kid I sometimes got in trouble for talking over people and/or talking too loud. Many people in my family will sometimes even refuse to raise their voice when background noise is too high to make listening possible. We'll often just wait however many minutes it takes for it to get quiet, or simply go somewhere quieter to re-attempt conversation.
 
Old 02-22-2007, 12:43 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,119,224 times
Reputation: 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
LOL!
Are you one of those northerners that likes to talk at a machine-gun like pace?
"j33: I am. I had to be otherwise I would have never gotten a word in edgewise with my family. Between my boston born grandmother and my nyc born grandfather, our large holiday dinners were a loud fast talking affairs, that I'll always remember with fondness (damn I miss them). It isn't something I've ever thought about until I was once told 'hon, you HAVE to slow down' "

I am.... but I have gotten so much better
j33- isn't it wonderful - I miss those meals too ((sigh))
 
Old 02-22-2007, 12:50 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,119,224 times
Reputation: 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightcopperkettles View Post
If you hear someone say "all y'all," you may safely assume they need additional schooling in grammar.

Have a nice evening, y'all! :-)
Or we may mean to bring all of everyone's whatever.... like: "Y'all bring all your kids" might be "Bring all y'all's children"
 
Old 02-22-2007, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Brookwood
2 posts, read 4,093 times
Reputation: 11
Default Southern not red neck

I invite people to visit Alabama and experience southern hospitality at its best. Certainly you may encounter a good 'ol redneck but, DELIVERANCE characters they are not. Our ladies are genuine ladies of southern character, offering cordial invitations, offering up home-cooked meals (and no it isn't possum or coon.)
We don't all wear cut-off shorts with high heels or cowboy boots. Not all southern women aspire to be the beauty queen, or pregnant and barefoot. Some of us have Bachelor's degrees and Master's degees, and careers. We write poetry, and paint. We listen to all varieties of music au contraire to what you may believe.

Hollywood has painted an image of all or most of southerners as rednecks just as it has suggested that all blondes are ditzy or men in black are bad guys and men in white ar good, and satan is a red man with horns, a pointed tail and a pitchfork.

If you come to Alabama looking for rednecks, you'll find them but if you come looking for southern charm, rich history and good southern food, you'll find that also.
 
Old 02-22-2007, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,124,580 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I never heard of that Senator... But I have heard of Foghorn Leghorn. (the name ryhmed, I love that cartoon rooster, lol)

I too enjoy hearing strong regional accents. I never heard a Tidewater accent but I hope I do someday.
Hmmm....

You must really hear a tidewater accent. Its actually the most aristocratic of southern, and it can be heard as far south as Charleston.

But the center point is Richmond (not really tidewater, but settled by the early settlers from tidewater). Oddly enough you can hear it in northern parts of the Shenandoah Valley because some planters from tidewater built some plantations in those areas when they were wearing out the soil from tobacco.

....

Pat Robertson has some features of the tidewater accent, although he was born and raised in Lexington.
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