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Old 11-17-2008, 09:48 AM
 
414 posts, read 623,769 times
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Fascinating...sending it on to some friends. Thank you for posting!
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Old 11-17-2008, 09:48 AM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,212,590 times
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Population density is often a misleading view of efficient use of land

Need to also map where >>$100K/yr jobs are located...and where such employees choose to live in any region...most seem to favor leafy suburbs w/houses on >1 acre lots, not urban cubicles somewhere

Most of SF region's economy is sprawled out in suburban office parks stretching ~40mis from RedwoodShores to SanJose; and most well-paid employees live in the hills of SF Peninsula, West of PaloAlto...City of SF is a largely residential suburb of SiliconValley that younger, very well-paid employees w/o kids favor

Most modern US urban regions have LA-style decentralized economies....w/clusters of important offices in various suburban corridors, like BeverlyHills, Irvine and 1000 Oaks....or Dallas' concentration of important offices in the Richardson/Plano corridor...

Chicago has most of its highest-paid jobs centralized in the Loop....prob the most economically centralized city in US of note....as NYC's most well-paid jobs are divided ~65%/35% between MidtownManhattan and suburban Greenwich (some 35mis N of Midtown)
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Old 11-17-2008, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,520 posts, read 11,995,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Need to also map where >>$100K/yr jobs are located...and where such employees choose to live in any region...most seem to favor leafy suburbs w/houses on >1 acre lots, not urban cubicles somewhere
Why? Are these the only jobs and employees that count?
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:24 AM
 
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Hey, owltrucker, can you explain the layout? A few of my friends were confused and thought it would be more interesting if it corresponded more closely to geography.
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:36 AM
 
5,659 posts, read 13,629,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Population density is often a misleading view of efficient use of land

Need to also map where >>$100K/yr jobs are located...and where such employees choose to live in any region...most seem to favor leafy suburbs w/houses on >1 acre lots, not urban cubicles somewhere

Most of SF region's economy is sprawled out in suburban office parks stretching ~40mis from RedwoodShores to SanJose; and most well-paid employees live in the hills of SF Peninsula, West of PaloAlto...City of SF is a largely residential suburb of SiliconValley that younger, very well-paid employees w/o kids favor

Most modern US urban regions have LA-style decentralized economies....w/clusters of important offices in various suburban corridors, like BeverlyHills, Irvine and 1000 Oaks....or Dallas' concentration of important offices in the Richardson/Plano corridor...

Chicago has most of its highest-paid jobs centralized in the Loop....prob the most economically centralized city in US of note....as NYC's most well-paid jobs are divided ~65%/35% between MidtownManhattan and suburban Greenwich (some 35mis N of Midtown)
You said, "Population density is often a misleading view of efficient use of land." Are you using income as a measure of efficiency? Please expand on this.
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:44 AM
 
1,992 posts, read 5,929,735 times
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Originally Posted by Unstable View Post
Hey, owltrucker, can you explain the layout? A few of my friends were confused and thought it would be more interesting if it corresponded more closely to geography.
The densest city is NYC, and all the other cities expand radially outward from there, roughly in descending order. Although I am not sure why SF and L.A. are where they are.
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
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HSW has an extremely narrow focus on the hedge fund industry. To him, all the rest of society (pretty young starlets excepted) don't really matter.

The thing is, people who like urban environments generally don't care where hedge fund managers work or live.
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:47 AM
 
5,659 posts, read 13,629,253 times
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Nice job, owltrucker. One thing that jumped out at me was Detroit. That city has lost about 50% of its population since 1970. If it had retained its population at the 1970 level, its density would be greater than Chicago, Boston and Phila. today. Yes, I know those 3 cities have lost various amounts of population since 1970, too, but not on the scale of Detroit.

It would be interesting to see how the density levels among the cities have ebbed and flowed during the 20th century. Maybe someday when I have time...
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Old 11-17-2008, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
8 posts, read 40,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unstable View Post
Hey, owltrucker, can you explain the layout? A few of my friends were confused and thought it would be more interesting if it corresponded more closely to geography.
I started by arranging the cities so that they would fit together compactly, then tried switching them around in regional groupings, so it's semi-random. So the location of cities in the graph doesn't really mean anything quantitatively.

I agree that a geographically arranged graph would be interesting.
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Old 04-26-2010, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Cedar Park, TX
580 posts, read 918,586 times
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For some reason I can't access the graphic. When I copied and pasted the link into the search bar, it told me that it couldn't locate the blog.
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