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Old 02-28-2007, 08:22 PM
j33
 
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And for me, I hate living in 'less populated areas' I tried that for 3 years and didn't like it, so now I'm back, and I've been here most my life. And while technology may make it easier to work from different places in certain fields, I have a hard time imagining a world-class theater scene in Billings, Montana. Some things require a certain density of population to support and foster them. So for every person who feels like living in a city is like 'living in prison' there are those who feel just the same about more rural environs. And no, I'm not some young 20 something sewing her wild oats either, those days are past.
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Old 03-01-2007, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,384,130 times
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For some folks, like me, its just the thought of living in a big city thats entertaining. Id rather live in a 60 story skyscraper in downtown Chicago than a country home on the range. Sure each has its positives and negatives, but we all know which one would get boring over time. LOL Some people balance moving to an expensive city by ditching the car (you dont need one if you live and work downtown), not having to pay insurance, etc. Jobs are another reason as well. But I really believe most people live in expensive cities for jobs and lifestyle. Theres nothing like having everything just blocks from your home and opening the curtains at night and seeing a megatropolis sprawled out beneath you, its breathtaking. Of course you pay for it, but its more than worth it IMO.
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Old 03-01-2007, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,792,531 times
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Yet you don't get that fresh air and scenery in the city, and if a there's a natural diasater, things get very desperate. Agreed that farm life isn't exciting, but big city living just puts me on edge and doesn't seem all that exciting either. When you see homeless people, it just seems depressing. Since many people spend a lot more time in front of the TV or computer than out on the town, I can't see rural living being a disadvantage.
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Old 03-01-2007, 01:06 PM
 
Location: The Bronx
1,587 posts, read 1,262,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Yet you don't get that fresh air and scenery in the city, and if a there's a natural diasater, things get very desperate.
I was in San Fran during the Loma Prieta earthquake. It wasn't even that big! 1906 was, literally, 50 times stronger.

The National Guard was directing traffic on Van Ness Avenue. I go to the supermarket - they've got lights on powered by a generator in the parking lot.

There's a big sign inside "No Batteries, no water, no ice, no...etc." I buy what there was to buy that I wanted, I'm leaving...

There's two guys fighting in the parking lot. They're all bloody. This one guy hits the other, he lurches towards me, with this bloody head...

I think to myself: THIS IS IT. THIS IS THE BREAKDOWN OF CIVILIZATION.

Not quite. The SFPD stopped giving out parking tickets...for four days.

I'm a city man, myself. But what you say about disasters is entirely true.
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Old 03-01-2007, 02:26 PM
 
Location: At work
364 posts, read 396,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
It seems like they should just leave the expensive cities and all go to cheaper ones. They will have nore fun with people their own age, and can create their own businesses and jobs. That's something the gay guys always semed to do, find the cheaper, run down parts of cities and turn them into parties filled with drugs. Eventually values go up and it's gentrified. (South beach, Wilton Manors, Key West) Now that all cities are grossly overpriced and businesses are cutting back, economic collapse is the only hope. I would never locate my company in an expensive city when today we have the Internet and globalization means that anyplace with space and resources competes on an equal level. Why locate your business in New York or California when Texas or Alabama would be better. Too bad so many ypung people just want to follow the crowd and get nowhere.

Alot of what you are saying is your opinion. Like "have more fun with people their own age". There is no comparison from NYC to Alabama where "fun" is concerned. And "get nowhere". That is your opinion. Somehow I doubt every twenty-something in NYC and Boston is getting "nowhere". In Alabama.. gee lets think what they could get? Well South Alabama they can get hurricanes and seasonal problems. Forget having a business there. So many have gone under due to those problems. The beach closes up after Sept. and the poverty stricken service industry locals are struggling. Rural Alabama (which there is plenty of) what are they going to do there? So I guess bottom line your talking about that laughable "city" Birmingham, Mobile or Hunstville. Alabama. LOL. Yee haw!
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Old 03-01-2007, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska (moving to Ohio)
673 posts, read 3,751,722 times
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I dont think Chicago is really an expensive city compared to Los Angeles and San Diego. I can see why people would want to live in Chicago it gives people alot of amenities that cant be beat for the cost of housing.
Right now I live in a small city that doesnt have the density to really support more then chain stores, their isnt any interesting activities. However, I dont to have entertainment or have a museum one has to live in California or Miami and pay alot of money to enjoy good arts, entertainment and have a good night out on the town.

I was more talking about cities where the housing costs are so high that people working regular jobs would pay a majority of their income in rent or mortgage.

It just gets me wondering why people would pay double the amount for housing to live in San Diego and Los Angeles when the pay scale is no better then Minneapolis or Chicago.

I dont see why any one who isnt wealthy would want to live in California, Oregon or Washington. They might be utopian if one is well-off, but for the average job that doesnt come close to what the cost of housing how do people enjoy what these cities offer if everything goes to rent or the car payment.
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Old 03-01-2007, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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True, Chicago is cheaper than LA and NYC, but its FAAAAAAAAAR from cheap. Ive seen 1 BR condos go for 550K in desirable spots. Then there are those outrageous 2 million dollar condos that are only 3 BR, but theyre just priced high because of location and view.
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Old 03-01-2007, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
414 posts, read 2,415,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msjbrent View Post
Alot of what you are saying is your opinion. Like "have more fun with people their own age". There is no comparison from NYC to Alabama where "fun" is concerned. And "get nowhere". That is your opinion. Somehow I doubt every twenty-something in NYC and Boston is getting "nowhere". In Alabama.. gee lets think what they could get? Well South Alabama they can get hurricanes and seasonal problems. Forget having a business there. So many have gone under due to those problems. The beach closes up after Sept. and the poverty stricken service industry locals are struggling. Rural Alabama (which there is plenty of) what are they going to do there? So I guess bottom line your talking about that laughable "city" Birmingham, Mobile or Hunstville. Alabama. LOL. Yee haw!
I'm glad that so many Americans have such a negative attitude towards Alabama and the rest of the Deep South (North Carolina not included nor Atlanta metro area) -- it keeps the riffraff away from one of the country's finest regions.

Until Hurricane Katrina, the Gulf Coast has rarely seen hurricanes of much scale . It was a freak storm and may be part of another 30 year cycle although it is likely not going to happen again for a long time.

Southern Alabama along the Gulf Coast has always had this kind of tourism based industry although you can find more of an economy and jobs in Mobile for sure. Birmingham, Huntsville, and to some extent Tuscaloosa are growing cities with a significant job base, good wages, and a low cost of living. There are a dozen or so Fortune 500 companies in the state in financial services, healthcare, and agriculture.

Frankly 40k in Birmingham buys a much more comfortable lifestyle than in say Chicago. Shivering on the L and paying 1000/mo for a small apt, not being able to have a car (esp in NYC), shivering and taking public trans to bars or other activities or pooling for a taxi is not fun. Jobs are much more competitive, stressful, and longer hours in big cities. Thats a downside too.

There are plenty people in their 20 somethings in Birmingham. They know that they can spend less of their disposable income on going out, and trying to impress their yuppie friends like in New York City, or curtail obligatory working out without finding themselves single.

Rural Alabama offers tourism/services, predominantly agriculture, some automobile assembly plants, natural resources just like any other state would. Hmm the economy of upstate New York is so much better than rural Alabama's or downstate Illinois -- ya right.

The weather is better down South too if you can take the heat and humidity. If not than don't go. Beats cold for me anyday and waiting for the wonderful L for 15 minutes in 10 degree windy winter weather.

Some people are getting ahead in New York City and Boston. There are people there who work very hard, are talented at their work and move on to assume great positions of responsibility and perhaps very high financial rewards. For them the desire to be at the top of their profession and their ambitious drive necessitates that they live and work in these cities. The financial rewards can be extraordinary but for the vast majority of these people/competitors that isn't so.

Many of the Boston and NYC denizens will rent for a significant number of years wasting valuable disposal income before purchasing an overpriced condo and paying high maintenance fees. In Birmingham you can buy a nice little condo (probably 800 sq ft) with a few years of saved up post college grad pay. Who is getting on their way to financial freedom there?

The cost of living and intensity of living in a place like New York City or Boston would make it pretty stressful and difficult for a lot of people not living there besides more of the best job elite. Not everyone is elite just people posting on forums.

Any place is what you make of it? For some people like myself, going to a NYC nightclub or a restaurant or play is the antithesis of fun. With social anxiety, not liking big huge crowds, and being an introvert, such an evening is very stressful and uncomfortable to me. A lot of people don't enjoy the NYC nightlife scene and would not have fun there. Birmingham might offer less "toney" bars or a toned down scene but it might be more relaxed and fun to other people.

How about in Alabama you can enjoy taking a nice summer evening drive, play baseball with friends or a church league, barbecue and take a dip in the pool, go to a movie or the mall in a bigger city if you so wish, go to a concert, lay out on the porch and listen to music, talk, go to any one of many mountains and lakes and go fishing, hiking, camping, boating. Hmm Alabama is a lot more fun because in a big city you can only go shopping, to movies, concerts, plays, nightclubs, and restaurants in a taxi or with a paid hunt for it parking spot. You also can live 20 miles outside of say Birmingham and be in the sweet, good old country.

Alabama has a lot of beautiful historic houses some that are quite a bit gracious and nicer than those up north in Concord, Massachusetts or Lattingtown, Long Island. For one you can get your flowers in March or April. Alright I've gone overboard defending the state but you get the jist. Its a nice, more relaxing life for many and there is more to the state than the destroyed gulf coast towns and more poor southern third.
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Old 03-01-2007, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
414 posts, read 2,415,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Yet you don't get that fresh air and scenery in the city, and if a there's a natural diasater, things get very desperate. Agreed that farm life isn't exciting, but big city living just puts me on edge and doesn't seem all that exciting either. When you see homeless people, it just seems depressing. Since many people spend a lot more time in front of the TV or computer than out on the town, I can't see rural living being a disadvantage.
Tall I totally agree. Big city living puts me on the edge big time. I feel pushed around and rushed and continually threatened by stuff. Its depressing being boxed in by all the skyscrapers, cruddy northern weather and homeless.
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Old 03-01-2007, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
414 posts, read 2,415,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
And for me, I hate living in 'less populated areas' I tried that for 3 years and didn't like it, so now I'm back, and I've been here most my life. And while technology may make it easier to work from different places in certain fields, I have a hard time imagining a world-class theater scene in Billings, Montana. Some things require a certain density of population to support and foster them. So for every person who feels like living in a city is like 'living in prison' there are those who feel just the same about more rural environs. And no, I'm not some young 20 something sewing her wild oats either, those days are past.
Why does it have to be world class? Can't it just be fun and enjoyable? I've seen plenty of good theater in a place like Billings, Montana. You all are too funny
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