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Old 02-26-2007, 12:13 PM
 
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does anyone know any areas in the united states that have alot of celtic (scottish, irish, scots-irish, welsh) people aside from the inner city neighborhoods in boston/nyc,etc?

is there anywhere where even the rural areas have celtic-descended people that have influenced the local culture (ie-with fiddle-playing and pub culture)?

anywhere evocative of rural irish-life in america?
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Old 02-26-2007, 12:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
does anyone know any areas in the united states that have alot of celtic (scottish, irish, scots-irish, welsh) people aside from the inner city neighborhoods in boston/nyc,etc? is there anywhere where even the rural areas have celtic-descended people
In the southeastern USA, that would probably be North and South Carolina.
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Old 02-26-2007, 12:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Figment 07 View Post
In the southeastern USA, that would probably be North and South Carolina.
slightly off topic, but are the carolinas becoming more like florida? ive never been, but ive seen alot of pictures and it looks very gentrified and modern....even outside the cities....i dunno how to describe it, but i just havent come across any pictures of places in the carolinas that look like the rustic old rural towns that spring to mind when people usually think of the south....is there any places like that left in the carolinas....or is it all becoming a modernized cluster of northern/western emigrants?
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Old 02-26-2007, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Tejas
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I know there is a guy (Ger Carthy) from Kerry that plays the bars over in Santa Fe. IVe seen him one and thought he was real good.
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Old 02-26-2007, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Gulfport, MS
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White Southerners tend to be of solidly Scots-Irish stock. Scots-Irish are not, as their name suggests, mixed Scots and Irish, but rather descendants of lowland Scots who emigrated to Ireland before coming to America. Methodist and Baptist tend to be the primary religions. Listen to old-time country music or bluegrass music, and you can hear a strong Celtic folk influence. Southerners have a Celtic element to their lifestyle, but one a couple of centuries removed from either Ireland or Scotland. What you're looking for you'd probably find in communities built on more recent immigration, and recent immigrants tended to congregate in cities instead of rural areas.
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Old 02-26-2007, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
slightly off topic, but are the carolinas becoming more like florida? ive never been, but ive seen alot of pictures and it looks very gentrified and modern....even outside the cities....i dunno how to describe it, but i just havent come across any pictures of places in the carolinas that look like the rustic old rural towns that spring to mind when people usually think of the south....is there any places like that left in the carolinas....or is it all becoming a modernized cluster of northern/western emigrants?
I'm sure there are a few places left that fit that description in NC, SC, GA, AL, TN, MS and maybe some in Florida. However, and that's a BIG however, towns have a very hard time surviving if they don't keep up with some modernization. People cannot continue to populate a place if there's no work, or if the services are not up to date. Just come on down and take a drive thru some of the rural areas and you'll find some of those small rustic towns. But unless they're going through a revitalization effort, you won't find many people, especially in the younger age group.
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Old 02-26-2007, 07:30 PM
 
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I agree with the previous posters about the Carolinas.

South Carolina, for example:
in the lowcountry, around Charleston, and inland toward Columbia, you have predominantly a English, French Hueguenot, and/or African. When you get farther upstate around Greenville and Spartanburg (and farther up into the NC/TN Appalachians), you have very strong Scottish influences. Bluegrass music evolved from scottish music, for example.

the sociology of South Carolina is very clan-ish, and even today was very obviously descended from the Scots. I've seen many books written on the subject, but never read any in-depth. I don't know about the Irish, though, I think they originially emigrated into the Northeast, not the Southeast. But I'm sure they ended up all over the place.

As far as I know, you can find that scottish-type culture throughout the mountains & hills of north Georgia, western NC and SC, east Tennessee, and western Virginia. Once you get up into West Virginia or Pennsylvania, I'm not sure.
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Old 02-27-2007, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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I'm part Irish and the most Irish place I've ever seen in America is Woodlawn, which is a section of the Bronx. This place has a large Irish-American population and is overflowing with recent Irish immigrants. Pubs are located nearly on every corner, along with different types of Irish restaurants and stores.

I've never been to any Irish sections of Boston, so I really couldn't compare it to there.

I guess it doesn't fit your description so much though because its in the NYC area, but Woodlawn isn't soo urban. Its more like semi-urban, if not suburban.
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Old 02-27-2007, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
slightly off topic, but are the carolinas becoming more like florida? ive never been, but ive seen alot of pictures and it looks very gentrified and modern....even outside the cities....i dunno how to describe it, but i just havent come across any pictures of places in the carolinas that look like the rustic old rural towns that spring to mind when people usually think of the south....is there any places like that left in the carolinas....or is it all becoming a modernized cluster of northern/western emigrants?

Small rural area towns aren't exactly cut off from communication with the rest of the world, so the people that live there, I imagine, certainly don't want to be stuck in the past. Sometimes houses and other old buildings are torn down or destroyed some other way and they are replaced with...new construction (just like anywere else). I think you might be imagining small towns during the depression maybe? The south was generally very poor for years after the Civil War, and the depression extended that poverty. But when technology made it so small towns could have the same amenities and luxuries or just everyday conveniences, country people want the same stuff and comfortable living conditions like everyone else. That town you're thinking about is on the Andy Griffith Show from the 1950's
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Old 02-27-2007, 12:10 PM
 
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the whole of the southeastern us basically
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