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Old 11-25-2014, 11:15 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,513 posts, read 17,740,343 times
Reputation: 30801

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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
More impressive: Spokane, Denver, Phoenix, Kansas City

Worse: Wichita, Rapid City, Albuquerque, Santa Fe
Considering Albuquerque's reputation is already rock-bottom, I am amazed that it was worse than the worst that could be expected.

 
Old 11-25-2014, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,428,775 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Considering Albuquerque's reputation is already rock-bottom, I am amazed that it was worse than the worst that could be expected.
I went into it thinking it would be better than it was. How I came to that conclusion, I don't know.

I still want to go back though.
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Old 11-25-2014, 11:42 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,161,400 times
Reputation: 4349
Chicago was a bit underwhelming. I look back at my experiences in the city and realize that all I truly appreciated was the beautiful architecture and how surprisingly down to Earth some of the locals were, which were both welcome treats, but I couldn't get over the feeling that something seemed to be missing. But I plan on visiting the city again so I'm hoping my feelings would one day change.

Atlanta was another disappointment. Much more sprawled and suburban in feel than I had previously imagined it would be. Downtown looked and felt very small. Buckhead is a real feast for the eyes, though.

Pittsburgh was great! I had never seen such an artful combination of rugged terrain, forestation and historic urban development. The whole hidden city effect was very inspiring and part of me felt like I wanted to live there forever. The locals were also pretty cool, if not a tad provincial.

Dallas continues to surprise me. I'm a native Texan, and I grew up believing that this was the one city in my state that I was supposed to dislike for whatever reason, yet every time I'm there I enjoy my stay. There's just an overwhelming sense of comfort and well being all over the place...not to mention way more trees than most people think there are. The locals aren't the absolute friendliest, but they aren't antisocial either. Everyone is just so Type A and way too busy with life to care what you think about them or their city. It's still a pretty vanilla town, but there's a bit of rum thrown in to make things a little interesting.
 
Old 11-25-2014, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,428,775 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Chicago was a bit underwhelming. I look back at my experiences in the city and realize that all I truly appreciated was the beautiful architecture and how surprisingly down to Earth some of the locals were, which were both welcome treats, but I couldn't get over the feeling that something seemed to be missing. But I plan on visiting the city again so I'm hoping my feelings would one day change.
That's the one thing I didn't get from Chicago. I felt like it had everything, well more than enough to tickle all of the senses.

I've never been to the other three you mentioned, so I can't compare.
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Old 11-25-2014, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,417,785 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Chicago was a bit underwhelming.
Whoa! Thats a first!


Impressive: Milwaukee, St. Augustine, FL, and KC.

Not-so-impressive: Las Vegas, Tampa, Omaha, Seattle.
 
Old 11-25-2014, 12:54 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,161,400 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
That's the one thing I didn't get from Chicago. I felt like it had everything, well more than enough to tickle all of the senses.

I've never been to the other three you mentioned, so I can't compare.
It wasn't an actual lack of amenities that was the problem but just a general progressive spirit that I had trouble finding. It didn't make things better that I've met so many natives who couldn't help but express how much they disliked their own town. Some couldn't even understand why I wanted to come there.

But again, this is based off of only a few short visits. I look forward to being proven wrong in the future.
 
Old 11-25-2014, 03:59 PM
 
Location: City of St. Louis
15 posts, read 13,659 times
Reputation: 36
I haven't been disappointed in any of the places I've visited this year. That includes: Kansas City, Denver, Memphis, and Louisville.

Memphis and Louisville were little mini-excursions/vacations and were definitely my favorite stops.
 
Old 11-25-2014, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,833 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63489
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
What disappointed you about Philly, if you don't mind me delving?
Well, I hate to be a downer, but you did ask.

1) It smelled bad. Maybe it was just the time of year, I don't know, but there was a definite funky smell just about everywhere I went.

2) Outside the historic sites, the city seemed unusually dirty.

3) The people were considerably less friendly in general than I am used to. I am from the South, and am used to even big city inhabitants being more friendly than that. So their complete lack of smiles and warmth was quite striking. Especially since I was living in Maryland at the time and hadn't noticed a huge difference between Marylanders and Southerners. It really took me aback.
 
Old 11-25-2014, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,752,754 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I'm no hyper-booster of Austin, not at all. But this statement is 100% FALSE and ridiculous. I've spent some time in Austin, and there's way more to do there than the population size would normally dictate...and I never once went to a "shopping mall" or drove around endlesslessly. I had quite the opposite experience.
Though I totally agree with you that Austin offers much more than shopping malls and traffic jams, I have to say... I'm one of those people who was severely let down by Austin. Then again, my perception is different than most since I used to live there. If this was mid-90's Austin we were discussing, then I would be singing a MUCH different (and more positive) tune, but I really hate the direction that city has gone in since the mid-to-late 90's. It has really lost a LOT of what used to make it unique, eclectic, and truly Bohemian. Today it just seems very shallow, superficial, and not very different from most of your typical neo-hipster bastions. Sure, this makes it stand out in Texas, but the novelty wears off real fast.

The great irony is that Austin, probably more than any other city in the nation, has it's hype machine cranked up to eleven, constantly. And it really doesn't deliver on it's promises. Back when it was still the best-kept secret in Texas, it delivered all that and more. The more Austin toots it's own horn as being "weird" or "different", the more it loses what used to actually make it weird and different. It's sad.
 
Old 11-25-2014, 06:07 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,465,557 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
It wasn't an actual lack of amenities that was the problem but just a general progressive spirit that I had trouble finding. It didn't make things better that I've met so many natives who couldn't help but express how much they disliked their own town. Some couldn't even understand why I wanted to come there.

But again, this is based off of only a few short visits. I look forward to being proven wrong in the future.
Chicagoans tend to speak negatively about the politics of their town and state. Some by the limit their social status has limited them to.... but that is everywhere? But since I lived there in the early 80s. I find now Chicagoans are very proud of their Downtown and much of their city. That was once the opposite.
But especially transplants who chose to move there in good jobs are very complementary of their adopted city. Gentrification produces new restored vibrant neighborhoods that continue to grow. I see improvements each visit. Despite those who look down upon the city by sensationalized crime.

I do realize your assessment is your impression till proven otherwise on future visits.
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