U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-07-2008, 12:33 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,362,957 times
Reputation: 1523

Advertisements

Apple doesn't fall that far from the tree...

Kids who have parents who themselves are confused underachievers, who typically have more kids than they can afford....tend to be obese kids (often w/high rates of various self-created chronic diseases like diabetes, STDs, etc) who struggle in school...and later in their careers/personal life...much like their parents

Kids whose parents are well-adjusted people, who are education and career-oriented, tend to have better balance in their own prioritization of academic/career achievement vs play....prob lower rates of obesity, substance abuse, violence, unwanted pregnancies, etc...Darwinian selection perhaps...kids are a product of DNA and environment, largely created and influenced by choices of parents, esp in first 10-15yrs of life
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-07-2008, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,948 posts, read 13,731,169 times
Reputation: 11653
Quote:
Originally Posted by passdoubt View Post
I think a lot of it has to do with parents' neurosis. Playing in the neighborhood used to be okay. Now parents are too afraid of predators to let them roam free. All time must be programmed and supervised. When I was a kid the rule was "be in by dark." Now kids get picked up from school and ferried around to their pre-planned activities because it's suddenly become a big, bad scary world where children aren't fit to tread (in their parents' heads).
These comments are interesting to me because when I was a kid, we didn't even have the "be in by dark" rule. When it was time to come in and have a bath, dinner or go to bed, my mom would shout for me or call whosever house I was at. Or she'd shout to me "Dinner is at 7!" as I dashed out the door. There was 4 other girls my age in my neighborhood, plus my brother and one of the girl's brother. So we were always playing games even into the dark.

Did any harm come to us? No, not technically. But I was actually followed home once by a strange man in a dark blue van when I was about 8 or 9. Luckily, just as he got out of his van and started to approach me, I turned into my driveway. So I just ran in the door, burst into tears and told my mom what happened. She told my grandmother to call the police while she ran out the door and tried to catch up to the van that was speeding away in hopes of getting a plate number. The police came but he was long gone, I had to describe the man and his van.

I don't remember how long it took me to get over that incident but I do remember refusing to leave the house without my parents for a period of time. I was even scared just to cross the street to go to one of the neighorhood girl's house. Eventually, my older brother managed to coax me across the street as long as he held my hand and we ran as fast as we could. Things improved from there. But for a while, I was convinced that if a man was bold enough to approach me right outside my own home, nowhere outside the door was safe without my parents. I know that technically nothing happened but for an 8-9 year old kid the idea of what almost happened was terrifying. I lived in a bubble until that moment.

However, nothing about my parents changed. They did not become paranoid and insist I be supervised at all times. They did not think it was a big, bad world where children are not fit to tread. I suppose they did not want to encourage my fears of leaving the house.

Anyway, I know I gave more info than necessary but what I'm trying to say is that I don't think the reason for the change has to do with fear of the outside world. Even having a personal experience with the "big, bad world" did not provoke a change in my parents. As someone else mentioned, I think it has to do with the fact that these days, so many familes have two working parents that the child's free time has to be scheduled and managed around each parents working schedule.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Denver 'burbs
21,882 posts, read 23,227,069 times
Reputation: 37308
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Apple doesn't fall that far from the tree...

Kids who have parents who themselves are confused underachievers, who typically have more kids than they can afford....tend to be obese kids (often w/high rates of various self-created chronic diseases like diabetes, STDs, etc) who struggle in school...and later in their careers/personal life...much like their parents

Kids whose parents are well-adjusted people, who are education and career-oriented, tend to have better balance in their own prioritization of academic/career achievement vs play....prob lower rates of obesity, substance abuse, violence, unwanted pregnancies, etc...Darwinian selection perhaps...kids are a product of DNA and environment, largely created and influenced by choices of parents, esp in first 10-15yrs of life
I don't think you can say this across the board. Sometimes that may be the case but just as often the highly educated, career oriented parents are busy and wound up in their own thing. The easiest thing to do is buy the lastest video game the kid is crying for and let him sit there for hours on end. Both are stereotypes and sometimes true sometimes not. We live in a subdivision, I have a very active 15 yr old son who occasionally enjoys the video game thing. He has always played outside and ridden his bike to his friends houses, the pool etc. He still shoots hoops in neighbors' driveways or plays catch in the yard or park. One of my favorite moments ever was a number of years ago (I want to say he was 8 or 9) just before he went to sleep at night, he said "mom, I am having a great childhood". Doesn't get better than that from a parent's perspective.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,120 posts, read 102,899,540 times
Reputation: 33171
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Apple doesn't fall that far from the tree...

Kids who have parents who themselves are confused underachievers, who typically have more kids than they can afford....tend to be obese kids (often w/high rates of various self-created chronic diseases like diabetes, STDs, etc) who struggle in school...and later in their careers/personal life...much like their parents

Kids whose parents are well-adjusted people, who are education and career-oriented, tend to have better balance in their own prioritization of academic/career achievement vs play....prob lower rates of obesity, substance abuse, violence, unwanted pregnancies, etc...Darwinian selection perhaps...kids are a product of DNA and environment, largely created and influenced by choices of parents, esp in first 10-15yrs of life
I too, disagree with some of this. There is research that there is more childhood obesity in the (walkable) city than in the burbs. However, kids can't really prioritize well until they are in at least their later teens, and usually out of high school. The parents set the tone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Sun Diego, CA
521 posts, read 1,493,899 times
Reputation: 325
When I was a kid growing up in a suburban home in LA in the 90's, my friends and I used to play baseball on the street(with a tennis ball, since a hardball would be plain stupid). Baseball was the primary game but we'd also play football, basketball in our backyards, and other games. There used to be 6-8 of us on a daily basis playing until sundown, and thered be no cars parked on the street (everyone's cars were parked in their garage in the alley). The neighborhood felt like it was ours.

Today, I go back to the same neighborhood, since my parents now rent the home, and see nothing but cars parked on both sides of the street. The cars now own the neighborhood. No signs of kids anywhere! Albeit, my friends and I have grown up and moved out, in a neighborhood of about 30 homes you'd think that there'd be some kids in the area. But you wouldnt know it since they have no room to play. If I had a bulldozer I'd get rid of all those cars in a second and give the neighborhood back to the new generation who'd want nothing more than to pretend to be Manny Ramirez hitting that tennisball over the lightpole.

Last edited by wesside; 12-07-2008 at 03:38 PM.. Reason: edit
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,794 posts, read 23,261,099 times
Reputation: 5873
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Apple doesn't fall that far from the tree...

Kids who have parents who themselves are confused underachievers, who typically have more kids than they can afford....tend to be obese kids (often w/high rates of various self-created chronic diseases like diabetes, STDs, etc) who struggle in school...and later in their careers/personal life...much like their parents

Kids whose parents are well-adjusted people, who are education and career-oriented, tend to have better balance in their own prioritization of academic/career achievement vs play....prob lower rates of obesity, substance abuse, violence, unwanted pregnancies, etc...Darwinian selection perhaps...kids are a product of DNA and environment, largely created and influenced by choices of parents, esp in first 10-15yrs of life
You state this as fact. Not that I disagree with you - but how about something to prove the point you're trying to make?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 03:49 PM
 
Location: 👶🏾CHI🛫CVG🛬AVL🛫CMH🛬CHI🛫?
926 posts, read 2,461,934 times
Reputation: 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by jawny08 View Post
I'm only 28 but I've seen a drastic change in my lifetime in kid's experience growing up in their neighborhoods. When I was a kid when school let out the street/the park was filled w/ kids playing basketball, baseball, supersoakers, etc... It seems now more parents are want a new house and are moving to new neighborhoods that discourage closeness between neighbors. Add computers and videogames to the mix and it seems kids almost never go out to play anymore.

I hear people older than me tell stories of how they used to play stickball in the street. I feel that the exurbs may have changed the American childhood experience. WHen I go through suburban neighborhoods on a nice day now I just don't see kids outside anymore. What do you think?
good thread! in elementary school, after homework was done we were out in the streets till "streetlights" lol. in high school I did alot of after school activities but now a days I dont see many kids playing around like when I grew up and I dont know why...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 03:53 PM
Bo Bo won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Tenth Edition (Apr-May 2014). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Ohio
16,837 posts, read 33,295,624 times
Reputation: 13672
I think the media's wall-to-wall coverage of every missing child everywhere has created a nation of moms and dads afraid to let their kids out of the house alone until they're old enough to drive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,794 posts, read 23,261,099 times
Reputation: 5873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowie View Post
I think the media's wall-to-wall coverage of every missing child everywhere has created a nation of moms and dads afraid to let their kids out of the house alone until they're old enough to drive.
Agreed 100%.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2008, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
463 posts, read 1,370,770 times
Reputation: 275
I was a kid in the 90s and sadly, neither I nor almost anyone I know spend too much time playing outside growing up. What is even more sad is that my parents had the same next-door neighbors for ten years and I still don't recall ever talking to them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top