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Old 12-13-2018, 03:35 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,021,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
My thinking was: big blues city, older architecture, once was legendary but has fallen far and is now growing slowly, large black population. Some people have assigned Chicago to Houston or Dallas based on size but I don't think they really fit culturally.
Chicago isn't falling, it's changing. It's becoming a destination for more white collar and professional employees, and those who have struggled, are moving away. I don't think this is a negative for the city.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,296 posts, read 3,513,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Seattle - Raleigh/Chapel Hill
Portland - Austin (obviously)
Detroit - New Orleans
New York - Miami (good comparison, Colts, I wouldn't have thought of that)
Chicago - Memphis
Minneapolis - Atlanta? (older city, big for black music, fell far but is rebounding fast, decent public transit in regions that traditionally suck for that)
Indianapolis - Oklahoma City? (almost feels like a Southern city already)
Boise - Chattanooga?

I'm not getting the bolded at all. Atlanta has never fallen far in modern times.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:43 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,102 posts, read 35,052,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
I'm not getting the bolded at all. Atlanta has never fallen far in modern times.
Not since 1864 LOL. Since then, it's been famous for its resilience.
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Old 12-13-2018, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
I'm not getting the bolded at all. Atlanta has never fallen far in modern times.
Neither has Minneapolis. Unlike Sunbelt cities, Minneapolis never annexed vast swaths of outlying land and couldn't offset inner-city population loss. Almost every major American city lost inner-city population between 1950-2000.

However, there was never an economic decline in the Twin Cities like other major Midwestern metros due to diversified economy and better socioeconomic conditions.
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Old 12-13-2018, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
Neither has Minneapolis. Unlike Sunbelt cities, Minneapolis never annexed vast swaths of outlying land and couldn't offset inner-city population loss. Almost every major American city lost inner-city population between 1950-2000.

However, there was never an economic decline in the Twin Cities like other major Midwestern metros due to diversified economy and better socioeconomic conditions.

Atlanta is not one of those Sunbelt cities that annexed vast swaths, the region is not monolithic.
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Old 12-13-2018, 07:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Oh, sure, Chicago and Memphis. ?????
This is crazy. I've lived in both and they couldn't be any more different.
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Old 12-13-2018, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Atlanta is not one of those Sunbelt cities that annexed vast swaths, the region is not monolithic.
While Atlanta didn't do much widescale annexing after the 1950s (Atlanta more than doubled its land size in a 1952 annexation), much of its land was still empty and ripe for suburban development well into the second half of the 20th Century. This is why huge sections of the city are suburban in nature and don't follow any semblance of a grid system. Annexations gave it a land area of 133 sq mi, which is larger than the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul combined.

Interestingly enough, despite still having suburban land to develop, the city lost population through the 1970s-90s.
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Old 12-14-2018, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
While Atlanta didn't do much widescale annexing after the 1950s (Atlanta more than doubled its land size in a 1952 annexation), much of its land was still empty and ripe for suburban development well into the second half of the 20th Century.
Yes, and you had to go back 66 years in an attempt to justify your blanket statement. And no, much of its land was not still empty.

Quote:
This is why huge sections of the city are suburban in nature and don't follow any semblance of a grid system.
Wrong. The core of Atlanta in Downtown and Midtown is on a grid. The main streets in the rest of the City are old farm to market roads and Cherokee trading paths that follow the contours of our rolling topography. About 35% of the land area is taken up by the historic wealthy neighborhoods, with homes ranging from mansions on large lots to multi-acre estates. There is no equivalent to this in Minneapolis, or most large U.S. cities.

Quote:
Annexations gave it a land area of 133 sq mi, which is larger than the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul combined.
Atlanta wasn't hemmed in by incorporated suburbs on all sides like the Twin Cities were, we had room to grow. The City Limits here are very small in comparison to almost all of our peers.

Quote:
Interestingly enough, despite still having suburban land to develop, the city lost population through the 1970s-90s.
Wrong again. Atlanta did not have 'suburban land to develop' in that period, it was mostly built out. There were a lot of active industrial areas then as well.

As you previously stated, nearly all large cities experienced population loss during that era, including Atlanta. The suburbs were exploding here, just as they were in most Metros. I'm pretty certain that we are above our historic peak population at this point, and the upcoming Census should confirm this.

It's clear that you have no idea what you are talking about here, and are of the mindset that the Sunbelt is monolithic. It's not, no region is. Educate yourself a little before making such sweeping generalizations of a region you are clearly unfamiliar with.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:02 AM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,021,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
While Atlanta didn't do much widescale annexing after the 1950s (Atlanta more than doubled its land size in a 1952 annexation), much of its land was still empty and ripe for suburban development well into the second half of the 20th Century. This is why huge sections of the city are suburban in nature and don't follow any semblance of a grid system. Annexations gave it a land area of 133 sq mi, which is larger than the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul combined.

Interestingly enough, despite still having suburban land to develop, the city lost population through the 1970s-90s.
Minneapolis is so spread out, you never really know which suburb you're in, as the city, itself, isn't that big. I've never been a big fan of that, but it is what it is. There wasn't room for the city proper to grow...so the suburbs grew, instead.
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Old 12-14-2018, 09:35 AM
 
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Yeah, Minneapolis proper has like 300,000 people (St Paul in the 250-275 neighborhood). The metro is about 3.5 million.
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