U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-13-2010, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,970 posts, read 4,342,097 times
Reputation: 2010

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Veridian View Post
Thanks for the pictures of Savannah, Deacon- they are absolutely beautiful! I kick myself every time I think that I have yet to get to Savannah, despite taking several trips to Atlanta to visit a friend of mine. We half-made plans to go to Savannah on one of my trips, but it was Memorial Day weekend and we didn't want to deal with the tourism traffic.

Still, I'm sorry to say that the pictures from Atlanta didn't elevate my feelings about that city. Yeah, those rowhouses are new and clean...but also rather sterile. Quite frankly, I looked and looked for "charm" in Atlanta, and was genuinely disappointed in not finding it- at least not as much as I had expected.
Atlanta does actually have some charming neighborhoods. You just have to find them of the beaten path. I love Inman Park, Poncey-Highland and Virginia-Highland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2010, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,970 posts, read 4,342,097 times
Reputation: 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesomo.2000 View Post
It is not a opinion that Charlotte is less dense than northern cities. Just look at population density facts. This is comparing cities, it has nothing to do with quality of life.

Again, why are you so defensive? Whats the deal man?
I for one do not want to live in an extremely high density area. I like the "southern" development style of city amenities with space and affordability. There is a lot of snobbery on here that concludes that the "southern" way is bad. Well, like it or not thats how we build down here and apparently a lot of other people don't mind it since they move down here from all over. This is 2010 and the development patterns are much different from a lot of northern cities that were built when people still rode horses to get around. Like it or not but the main means of transportation for the United States is the automobile. Most southern cities are developing in an auto and pedestrian friendly manner which is much more convenient for todays lifestyle than the prior.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 01:11 AM
 
1,645 posts, read 3,191,107 times
Reputation: 1381
Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
I for one do not want to live in an extremely high density area. I like the "southern" development style of city amenities with space and affordability. There is a lot of snobbery on here that concludes that the "southern" way is bad. Well, like it or not thats how we build down here and apparently a lot of other people don't mind it since they move down here from all over. This is 2010 and the development patterns are much different from a lot of northern cities that were built when people still rode horses to get around. Like it or not but the main means of transportation for the United States is the automobile. Most southern cities are developing in an auto and pedestrian friendly manner which is much more convenient for todays lifestyle than the prior.
Bingo.

Thank you for putting into words what I've been trying to say for quite some time. It seems that there has been a silent conclusion on this board that higher density = superior. I'm sorry, but I don't agree in the least bit, nor do many others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 03:21 AM
 
1,712 posts, read 2,756,877 times
Reputation: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
I for one do not want to live in an extremely high density area. I like the "southern" development style of city amenities with space and affordability. There is a lot of snobbery on here that concludes that the "southern" way is bad. Well, like it or not thats how we build down here and apparently a lot of other people don't mind it since they move down here from all over. This is 2010 and the development patterns are much different from a lot of northern cities that were built when people still rode horses to get around. Like it or not but the main means of transportation for the United States is the automobile. Most southern cities are developing in an auto and pedestrian friendly manner which is much more convenient for todays lifestyle than the prior.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReluctantGardenStater View Post
Bingo.

Thank you for putting into words what I've been trying to say for quite some time. It seems that there has been a silent conclusion on this board that higher density = superior. I'm sorry, but I don't agree in the least bit, nor do many others.

Yet another vote of agreement from me
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
196 posts, read 539,358 times
Reputation: 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
New York-Atlanta (when you think of North or South these are probably the first cities you think of for each region
Philadelphia-Dallas- each have huge regional importance
Chicago-Houston- the number two cities that deserve more recogition from the number one city in their region, my opinion
Pittsburgh-Birmingham- does this need an explanation?
Inadianapolis-Charlotte- I have always heard these two are similiar, so for lack of a better reason here they are, I know that's a bad reason
Boston-Raleigh- I may catch heat fro this. Not because Raleigh is a thriving metropolis but each city has huge educational and research based economies I think that there are several similiarities, but Raleigh on a much smaller scale.
guesses:
New Orleans-Detroit
Jacksonville-Columbus
Nashville-Cleveland
I would also say Miami and New York City because of culture but I already used New York, so Miami is left out even though it is a huge southern city.

I believe the South offers no apologies for our big acres of land and suburban living. That's what makes the South the South historically. Atlanta may not have Center City but does Phily have Buckhead? Each city has its own unique flavor that offers the USA.
I like this list, except that I'm not sure I agree about Pittsburgh and Birmingham. While they are related in terms of history, I don't see any real similarities between the two today. The two Ohio River towns, Pittsburgh and Louisville, seem to have more in common to me. (Not that I know much about these cities.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 03:25 PM
 
4,677 posts, read 8,047,959 times
Reputation: 1236
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFriendlyGod View Post
I like this list, except that I'm not sure I agree about Pittsburgh and Birmingham. While they are related in terms of history, I don't see any real similarities between the two today. The two Ohio River towns, Pittsburgh and Louisville, seem to have more in common to me. (Not that I know much about these cities.)
Yea, with Pitt and Bham, I was referring to the once thriving steel industry. Other than that, I'm not sure if I could find any more similarities myself.

Also, count me in on the vote that density does not equate to superiority. However, I do believe in more dense development than haphazard sprawl.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 06:22 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
[Boston-Raleigh- I may catch heat fro this. Not because Raleigh is a thriving metropolis but each city has huge educational and research based economies I think that there are several similiarities, but Raleigh on a much smaller scale.
I agree. The economy and make-up of Raleigh and the greater "Triangle" is most similar to Boston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 02:26 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,998,915 times
Reputation: 1798
Indianapolis- Nashville
St. Louis- Memphis
Pittsburgh- Birmingham
Cleveland- Mobile
Detroit- New Orleans
Chicago- Atlanta
MSP- DFW
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 08:40 PM
 
44 posts, read 36,537 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
I for one do not want to live in an extremely high density area. I like the "southern" development style of city amenities with space and affordability. There is a lot of snobbery on here that concludes that the "southern" way is bad. Well, like it or not thats how we build down here and apparently a lot of other people don't mind it since they move down here from all over. This is 2010 and the development patterns are much different from a lot of northern cities that were built when people still rode horses to get around. Like it or not but the main means of transportation for the United States is the automobile. Most southern cities are developing in an auto and pedestrian friendly manner which is much more convenient for todays lifestyle than the prior.


I agree totally with you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2010, 09:29 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
Reputation: 14655
I always considered Pittsburgh to be the capital of "North Appalachia" and Knoxville the capital of "South Appalachia." If you combine Knoxville and Chattanooga, you get Pittsburgh with a Southern accent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top