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View Poll Results: Which is more unbearable: the Northern winter, or the Southern summer?
Northern winter 189 48.21%
Southern summer 203 51.79%
Voters: 392. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-05-2009, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,052,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
It's only 9:30am in Houston and the heat index is already 93 degrees...no thank you. I'll take my 72 degrees (that feels like 72 degrees)
Did you forget that's it's summer in the Gulf Coast region? That's what suppose to happen down there. Just like when December comes and New York is in the 20s, Houstonians are enjoying their upper 50s in the morning and lower 70s in the afternoon.
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Old 07-05-2009, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,236,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Did you forget that's it's summer in the Gulf Coast region? That's what suppose to happen down there. Just like when December comes and New York is in the 20s, Houstonians are enjoying their upper 50s in the morning and lower 70s in the afternoon.

It doesn't get to the 20s very much here during the day in the NY metro area. It isn't the norm. The average high is 44 degrees in December, with a low of 30. I'm just saying that northeast's summer temperatures are much more comfortable.
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Old 07-05-2009, 08:59 AM
 
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I saw New York City during the "New Year Event" to welcome 2009
and it looked rather nasty... windy/cold as it can be... No thank you
the south all the way! specially Florida!
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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It's really not all that bad. It's worse in Manhattan because the wind whips off the buildings. Anyway, I think a good amount of people would rather be in exciting NYC during New years eve in the cold, than some boring warm town in the south.
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:10 AM
 
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Have you ever been to that "ball drop" its way overrated! the only people that go there are usually those wacky tourists...
They couldn't pay me enough to stand there!
On the other hand theres always Nikki Beach, Miami People get naked, how about that?
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,236,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Native17 View Post
Have you ever been to that "ball drop" its way overrated! the only people that go there are usually those wacky tourists...
They couldn't pay me enough to stand there!
On the other hand theres always nikki beach, Miami People get naked, how about that? D

No, because it's mostly tourists who go. The locals go out to bars and clubs. Have you ever been to the ball drop? If it was so overrated, I don't think 1 million people would travel to Times Square. Also, I looked up the average temp during the ball drop--33 degrees. Not that bad.
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:19 AM
 
157 posts, read 342,173 times
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Somebody mentioned this before, and it deserves repeating. Given a bad heatwave, the summer in many Northern cities can be just as humid and scorching as much of the South - even worse, really, because so many of the buildings there lack central HVAC (I remember my old neighborhood in Pittsburgh, nearly 80% of the buildings had window unit AC.) You hear about people dying all the time in Northern heat waves; that's relatively uncommon in the southern tier of states, and much of that can be attributed to the relative lack of modern climate control in those states, due to the older (and in many cases, derelict) buildings. Some of the East Coast elitist snob types refer to this as "historic architecture." Uh huh...

So the Southern summer, for the most part, is only marginally "worse" than the Northern summer. But while people in the North are busy digging out from the latest blizzard in March, people in Southeastern and Southwestern states are busy enjoying outdoor activities in a pleasant climate.
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:24 AM
 
353 posts, read 710,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
No, because it's mostly tourists who go. The locals go out to bars and clubs. Have you ever been to the ball drop? If it was so overrated, I don't think 1 million people would travel to Times Square. Also, I looked up the average temp during the ball drop--33 degrees. Not that bad.
Yes, I went to the ball drop in 05-06
I didn't have much fun but it was mostly because i was really sick... we ended leaving at around 11 because we figured it would be better to watch it from the hotel TV while eating pizza or something
I love Times Squares just not in New Year...
that year it was a rather warm night i think the temp was around 50 with light winds, it wasnt bad at all honestly!
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
1,119 posts, read 3,818,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
Somebody mentioned this before, and it deserves repeating. Given a bad heatwave, the summer in many Northern cities can be just as humid and scorching as much of the South - even worse, really, because so many of the buildings there lack central HVAC (I remember my old neighborhood in Pittsburgh, nearly 80% of the buildings had window unit AC.) You hear about people dying all the time in Northern heat waves; that's relatively uncommon in the southern tier of states, and much of that can be attributed to the relative lack of modern climate control in those states, due to the older (and in many cases, derelict) buildings. Some of the East Coast elitist snob types refer to this as "historic architecture." Uh huh...

So the Southern summer, for the most part, is only marginally "worse" than the Northern summer. But while people in the North are busy digging out from the latest blizzard in March, people in Southeastern and Southwestern states are busy enjoying outdoor activities in a pleasant climate.
Actually a heatwave in the north is still not as bad as the south..
A heatwave in the south will never be felt in the north..
I have been in the south and the heat/humidity combination is disgusting..

I don't know how you guys do it down there, but it is just a miserable experience!
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Old 07-05-2009, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,564,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
Somebody mentioned this before, and it deserves repeating. Given a bad heatwave, the summer in many Northern cities can be just as humid and scorching as much of the South - even worse, really, because so many of the buildings there lack central HVAC (I remember my old neighborhood in Pittsburgh, nearly 80% of the buildings had window unit AC.) You hear about people dying all the time in Northern heat waves; that's relatively uncommon in the southern tier of states, and much of that can be attributed to the relative lack of modern climate control in those states, due to the older (and in many cases, derelict) buildings. Some of the East Coast elitist snob types refer to this as "historic architecture." Uh huh...

So the Southern summer, for the most part, is only marginally "worse" than the Northern summer. But while people in the North are busy digging out from the latest blizzard in March, people in Southeastern and Southwestern states are busy enjoying outdoor activities in a pleasant climate.
It may be 90 up here for a few days, but then a cold front comes through and it's back to a beautiful 70 degrees for the next week, unlike the south where its oppressively hot and humid for half the year. Also, I'll take our historic architecture over the south's numerous subdivisions, cookie-cutter houses, strip malls, and other forms of disgusting sprawl.
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