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Old 03-02-2007, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska (moving to Ohio)
673 posts, read 3,785,997 times
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I was wondering which cities people percieve as being cold personality wise?

I lived in Fargo for two years and the people in Fargo, North Dakota were the coldest people I have ever had the mis-fortune of being around. You go to the store there and the cashiers wouldnt say "how are you" or "have a nice day".

Luckily, Minnesota was right over the river and it was night and day. The people in Minnesota are wonderful and personable. They make you feel right at home.

Another thing is people in Fargo seem to not like making eye-contact with people, they are just very cold and impersonal people and their personalities are a great match for the cold, Fargo winters.

Fargo had a few friendly people, but overall the people just were cold as a Fargo winter.

Anyone here ever encountered a city just felt cold from the moment you arrived?

Last edited by MattDen; 03-02-2007 at 10:30 PM..
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Old 03-02-2007, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Midwest
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I thought the Cleveland-Akron area was awful. One year of alienation. Never again!
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,117,260 times
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Miami has cold hearted people for sure, if someone is friendly to you it's because they want something.
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Old 03-05-2007, 08:12 PM
 
450 posts, read 1,735,274 times
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Twin Cities, MN. People will help you if you're stuck in the snow, but don't expect a dinner invitation. Hardest place to meet people I've ever seen, and everywhere else I've lived, I have no problem meeting people quickly.
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Old 03-05-2007, 08:54 PM
 
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Pretty difficult to classify an entire bigger city anymore. Too much immigration changed the character in one section or the other.

The Old Boston was cold as ice. Only place I ever saw complete strangers come to a party in groups and then only talk and associate with the people they came with. WHAT was the point! Anybody circulating around was viewed as "Weird". Saw it a lot in large groups, even in business settings. Clannish to a fault was the word.

After the large influx of outsiders.

The Russians could be friendly or mean or weird. Depended on the person. I liked some of them very much. Some were very, very bright. Haitians could be funny, easy to meet, easy going. They liked to have buddies but were not shy about asking those buddies for everything and anything.

Irish off the boat could be fun once they got to know you a bit. The Swedes in Hyde Park were a blast, you got to know one, knew them all. Loved to party. Sadly not many left in the old neighborhoods.

Most of the South American types tended to be very clannish. Not the best of neighbors either. The modern Boston is probably best described as strange offshoot of the old turf idea. Only not just your location but nationality, age and did you fit into a certain mold. Lot more gang type thinking.

Honolulu could be a bit cold if you got out of the tourist traps. People tried to figure out where you fit first, assuming you were in a resident area. Not what the media projects.

Places in Idaho could be cold. Outsiders were treated different. Probably the influence of LDS church.

Most towns associated with the military can be one of two faces depending on how they viewed a stereotype of the typical military person. Groton CT was like that. If some guy's daughter had just run off with some boat sailor, you sure better not be asking him about nothing. With others you could be like family.

Chicago for a big city was one of the most friendly. San Francisco was also very good.
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Old 03-05-2007, 09:08 PM
 
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Spent some time in Indianapolis - not so much cold as generic. People had blank looks on their faces.
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Old 03-05-2007, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Shallow alcove hidden from the telescreen
2,872 posts, read 10,067,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post
I was wondering which cities people percieve as being cold personality wise?

I lived in Fargo for two years and the people in Fargo, North Dakota were the coldest people I have ever had the mis-fortune of being around. You go to the store there and the cashiers wouldnt say "how are you" or "have a nice day".

Luckily, Minnesota was right over the river and it was night and day. The people in Minnesota are wonderful and personable. They make you feel right at home.

Another thing is people in Fargo seem to not like making eye-contact with people, they are just very cold and impersonal people and their personalities are a great match for the cold, Fargo winters.

Fargo had a few friendly people, but overall the people just were cold as a Fargo winter.

Anyone here ever encountered a city just felt cold from the moment you arrived?
What was the name of that city you found people were cold?

For me, Denver, CO -- hurried and impersonal. Salt Lake City, on the other hand, struck me as much "warmer," friendlier and more relaxed.

On the East Coast, Baltimore was the un-friendliest city I'd ever encountered. I found the friendliest most helpful "folks" in Nashville.

Just my personal experience.

Last edited by Winston Smith; 03-05-2007 at 10:09 PM..
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Old 03-05-2007, 09:47 PM
 
3,042 posts, read 8,172,037 times
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philly, boston, portland maine, hartford, buffalo, trenton,
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Old 03-05-2007, 10:02 PM
 
1,501 posts, read 5,244,001 times
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Langhorne-Trevose area, PA.
But it's funny, go to another town in the same state, say New Hope, Paoli or a Philly neighborhood and it's like another planet altogether! Won't see so much "Just don't care, and You're really inconveniencing me just by existing" air in other towns.

Not surprised by the Philly suburb recommendation threads, either. Never see this area mentioned, despite being safe, green & pretty, nice homes, some decent schools, so convenient to shopping, Turnpike/I95/Rt1/ and Trains to Philly! Just deal with a random business, for starters, to see why (I believe) it's still never mentioned.

And try coming from Chicago and/or the South (back) to here! Talk about cultural shock! Depressing to walk outside, the way people can act so coldly and aloof around here. Seems like they're just used to it, though.

Last edited by Travel'r; 03-05-2007 at 10:17 PM..
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Old 03-05-2007, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
3,570 posts, read 8,019,002 times
Reputation: 5994
Detroit, Michigan and Flint Michigan.

Loved the post about Indy. I grew up in Indiana and have family in Indy. That post is soooo true!! People are not cold, just blank stares. Too much time in the cornfields is my take (as a born and bred Hoosier)
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