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Old 12-20-2008, 01:42 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660

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Just thought I'd throw this out there, because for the most part people make the Midwest out to be as flat and open as the Great Plains. While some states meet this criteria, particularly most of Illinois and Indiana, I know there are areas of the Midwest that are far from flat. Some examples would be the Missouri Ozarks, The Porcupine Mountains of Michigan, and Northern Wisconsin and Northern Minnesota, as well as the area in Northwest Illinois, Northeastern Iowa, Southeastern Minnesota, and Southwestern Wisconsin that escaped glaciation, in addition to Appalachian Ohio. While I know that certain cities in the Midwest like Chicago, Detroit, and Indianapolis are pretty level in terrain, there are other cities I have found that are not...St. Louis has its flat areas but also has big rolling hills too...the same with Kansas City, Cincinnati, and parts of Cleveland. I guess I was curious if Chicago, Detroit, and Indianapolis are really as flat as people make them out to be...what is the terrain of Milwaukee and the Twin Cities like? I know the Midwest can be flat in a lot of areas, but I know in other areas it has rolling hills too.
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Old 12-20-2008, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,323 posts, read 9,569,943 times
Reputation: 1512
Youngstown and the surrounding area is made up of rolling hills. Hills that get bigger the farther south and east you go.
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Old 12-20-2008, 03:03 PM
 
Location: IN
20,847 posts, read 35,948,307 times
Reputation: 13287
Duluth...
It has a superior natural setting compared with almost any city in the Midwest.
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Old 12-20-2008, 04:01 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,830 posts, read 21,140,229 times
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Areas around Downtown Cincinnati are downright rugged in parts







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Old 12-20-2008, 07:13 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,998 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Omaha, Nebraska is quite hilly. After living in Champaign, IL, I thought Indy was hilly! OTOH, I was never very impressed by the "hills" in NW Illinois. Didn't look much different than Champaign to me.
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Old 12-20-2008, 08:09 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,206,999 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Just thought I'd throw this out there, because for the most part people make the Midwest out to be as flat and open as the Great Plains. While some states meet this criteria, particularly most of Illinois and Indiana, I know there are areas of the Midwest that are far from flat. Some examples would be the Missouri Ozarks, The Porcupine Mountains of Michigan, and Northern Wisconsin and Northern Minnesota, as well as the area in Northwest Illinois, Northeastern Iowa, Southeastern Minnesota, and Southwestern Wisconsin that escaped glaciation, in addition to Appalachian Ohio. While I have heard that certain cities in the Midwest like Chicago, Detroit, and Indianapolis are pretty level in terrain, there are other cities I have found that are not...St. Louis has its flat areas but also has big rolling hills too...the same with Kansas City, Cincinnati, and parts of Cleveland. I guess I was curious if Chicago, Detroit, and Indianapolis are really as flat as people make them out to be...what is the terrain of Milwaukee and the Twin Cities like? I know the Midwest can be flat in a lot of areas, but I know in other areas it has rolling hills too.
Indianapolis is not "level in terrain", ajf. It is very flat in areas, but not overwhelmingly so like Chicago or Detroit. In fact, some areas have some pretty tall hills (Crown Hill, Mann Hill) and there is like a 250-foot difference in elevation across the city.
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Old 12-20-2008, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Road Warrior
2,015 posts, read 5,005,633 times
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The badlands/black hills ND/SD, very well not flat. Not much of a city around there though, but you can go to the Ozarks near Springfield, MO out to Tulsa, OK and it would be the most mountainous region in between the Apps and the Rockies.

Last edited by RangerDuke08; 12-20-2008 at 08:21 PM..
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Old 12-20-2008, 08:25 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,206,999 times
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Also ajf, if you take a look at the "terrain" feature of Google Maps, you can see that quite a few areas even in the flat parts of the the Midwest have steep river valleys with some pretty good topography nearby.
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Old 12-20-2008, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,251,141 times
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Yes, Duluth is lovely. Dubuque Iowa is not flat, nor are a lot of other Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio River cities. Hannibal Missouri has some serious hills, and even, Atchison Kansas.
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Old 12-21-2008, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
3,940 posts, read 13,338,550 times
Reputation: 2213
Rapid City's in the Black Hills.
Minneapolis was surprisingly hilly and had lots of bluffs around the Mississippi River. I hear Tulsa is hilly.
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