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Old 12-21-2008, 07:14 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,121,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Summers View Post
I was disappointed that they didn't have some native Atlantans in the Georgia section. The people from New Orleans didn't really have that Yat dialect that I was anticipating and I thought they shouldv'e included the Cajun accent on that site also for LA.
I've read that the Atlanta dialect is quite often confused with that of parts of Virginia for some reason. It's certainly unique to Georgia; my father's (an Atlanta native) accent sounded nothing like my mother's (who grew up in south GA).
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Old 12-21-2008, 08:25 AM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,335,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Summers View Post
^ Does the MD ones sound about right for you? I didn't really hear the famed Charleston and Savannah accents either. Overall I think this can be used for research, if you're bored, or in some arguments on dialects or whatever (to nobody in particular).
they sound right, although they all sound the same. I didn't hear Baltimore Accent, the Southern MD accent, The Eastern Shore one, or the Appalachian Maryland accent.
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Old 12-21-2008, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Where you wish you lived, LA
304 posts, read 829,609 times
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all southern people sound the same to me...it all sounds country-like and they say "yall" from texas to virginia its all the same to my ears
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Old 12-21-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: South Dakota
1,961 posts, read 6,181,298 times
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I have been in the south and there is some variations in the southern accents. The accents of those in in the western part of the south (Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas) sounds similar but a little different than the eastern part of the South (Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina). I notice a southern accent in places such as Missouri, Kentucky, Virginia, and North Carolina but not as strong as Alabama and Arkansas per se.

In the northern part of the country, there are some variation also. The accent is relatively neutral in places such as Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, parts of Missouri and Kansas, and Ohio. There is a northeastern accent in parts of Pennsylvania, New York, and New England. I can notice it when in visited New York and have come across a few people from this part of the country who have this accent whether it was strong or subtle. Then you have the Fargo-like accent in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, parts of Montana, and Wisconsin. I notice even some variations in South Dakota. Those in the nothern part of South Dakota have a strong Fargo like accent, those in western part of South Dakota sound similar to those in Wyoming and Colorado, and those south of Sioux Falls per se have a more neutral accent.

The western people have an accent of their own, but is not as noticeable to me as the northeastern and southern accents and is more subtle.

My accent is a slight Fargo accent, but would be more in line with how people speak in Iowa and Nebraska than in Minnesota. My southern relatives think that my parents have a stronger northern accent then me and I have more of a neutral accent.

It is interesting to hear the different accents.
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Old 12-21-2008, 10:35 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,291,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MachineKnownAsLosAngeles View Post
all southern people sound the same to me...it all sounds country-like and they say "yall" from texas to virginia its all the same to my ears
I guess that means you just aren't very bright or well traveled...right?
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:59 AM
 
2,758 posts, read 4,928,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
I've read that the Atlanta dialect is quite often confused with that of parts of Virginia for some reason. It's certainly unique to Georgia; my father's (an Atlanta native) accent sounded nothing like my mother's (who grew up in south GA).
The more I think about it they probably didn't have someone from our area because it's so blended and mixed. I think some in Columbus sound like us too.
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
they sound right, although they all sound the same. I didn't hear Baltimore Accent, the Southern MD accent, The Eastern Shore one, or the Appalachian Maryland accent.
I noticed that too, nobody's accent really jumped out at me in the MD clips. They did have that lady from BMore but she was too close to sounding neutral.
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Old 12-22-2008, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,264,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
I guess that means you just aren't very bright or well traveled...right?

That doesn't mean they're not well traveled or bright. Don't jump to conclusions. A lot of people up north travel all over the place and feel that way (like me). From Virgina to Texas, those accents all sound the same to me. I frequently go to the south too. Never notice a difference. When you're from a different area, it will generally all sound the same. That's why most of us can't distinguish different accents in the UK. Those from the UK will tell us there's maybe 5 different accents, but we all just hear one general accent. Just because you can't distinguish accents state by state doesn't mean you're less intelligent. I travel constantly and don't know the difference between a VA and TX accent.
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Old 12-22-2008, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Denver via Austin
3,119 posts, read 6,509,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
That doesn't mean they're not well traveled or bright. Don't jump to conclusions. A lot of people up north travel all over the place and feel that way (like me). From Virgina to Texas, those accents all sound the same to me. I frequently go to the south too. Never notice a difference. When you're from a different area, it will generally all sound the same. That's why most of us can't distinguish different accents in the UK. Those from the UK will tell us there's maybe 5 different accents, but we all just hear one general accent. Just because you can't distinguish accents state by state doesn't mean you're less intelligent. I travel constantly and don't know the difference between a VA and TX accent.
MachineKnownAsLosAngeles meant it as an insult. If you've read his posts, you can tell that he's not well traveled.
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Old 12-22-2008, 10:30 AM
 
Location: The Rock!
2,370 posts, read 7,002,332 times
Reputation: 804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris19 View Post
I have been in the south and there is some variations in the southern accents. The accents of those in in the western part of the south (Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas) sounds similar but a little different than the eastern part of the South (Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina). I notice a southern accent in places such as Missouri, Kentucky, Virginia, and North Carolina but not as strong as Alabama and Arkansas per se.
I can hear differences in people from even different parts of Arkansas. The "Bill Clinton" accent for instance is very prototypical southern AR but is not all that much like the northern AR accent. Even Delta speakers have a modestly distinctive accent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
That doesn't mean they're not well traveled or bright. Don't jump to conclusions. A lot of people up north travel all over the place and feel that way (like me). From Virgina to Texas, those accents all sound the same to me. I frequently go to the south too. Never notice a difference. When you're from a different area, it will generally all sound the same. That's why most of us can't distinguish different accents in the UK. Those from the UK will tell us there's maybe 5 different accents, but we all just hear one general accent. Just because you can't distinguish accents state by state doesn't mean you're less intelligent. I travel constantly and don't know the difference between a VA and TX accent.
Agree, it takes a special ear to hear different accents sometimes. I can fairly easily tell the difference between many northern accents despite not being native. The Philly and some MD accents are extremely similar but not quite the same. However, the Bmore accent is so distinctive it stands out like a sore thumb. You can discern the distance a person is from Baltimore by how the accent shifts from what I like to call the "Dundalk-Essex" standard. It works until you begin to hit Alleghany County when the Pittsburgher accent begins to kick in some. I can also easily tell some of the English accents apart but I don't understand the geographic significance except for the Liverpool accent.

I think it's particularly hard for northerners or westerners to pick up on different southern accents. I hypothesize that most southern accents do not originate in urban centers like seems to be so typical in northern areas. I don't think southern accents have the gradual gradations with a very strong geographic center with a huge number of speakers that exemplify that type like you have with say Boston, Philly, BMore, Rochester/Buffalo. Instead, southern accent prototypes are rural in nature with southern cities (with some notable exceptions) acting as mixing bowls.
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