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Old 12-28-2008, 12:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guestposter24 View Post
Not always, but sometimes, even I (a native born Southerner) have trouble hearing differences in Southern accents. I'm pretty sure it's because I'm listening to the actual voice and not the accent so much.
That is a good point, GP. I don't have much trouble at all distinguishing a "Deep South" accent, from that of the "Upper-South"....mainly because of the "drawl" and "twang" qualities, respectively. But to further deliniate the two main "sub-groups" into different more localized areas within is much more difficult. For one, like you, I am usually just listening to the voice and not all the nuances of inflection, etc.

As a interjecting note in passing, in Texas, these two groups "merge". East Texas more the drawl, West Texas more the twang...and some qualities of both found in between.

Really, what I find as the most "bonding" aspect of Southern American English -- spanning the many sub-dialects from Virginia across the Mountain and Deep South into far western Texas -- is the "idiom." That is, the common use -- or at least understanding -- of such terms as "y'all", or "yonder" or "coke" (as the generic name for any soft-drink)....
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Old 12-28-2008, 02:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
That is a good point, GP. I don't have much trouble at all distinguishing a "Deep South" accent, from that of the "Upper-South"....mainly because of the "drawl" and "twang" qualities, respectively. But to further deliniate the two main "sub-groups" into different more localized areas within is much more difficult. For one, like you, I am usually just listening to the voice and not all the nuances of inflection, etc.

As a interjecting note in passing, in Texas, these two groups "merge". East Texas more the drawl, West Texas more the twang...and some qualities of both found in between.

Really, what I find as the most "bonding" aspect of Southern American English -- spanning the many sub-dialects from Virginia across the Mountain and Deep South into far western Texas -- is the "idiom." That is, the common use -- or at least understanding -- of such terms as "y'all", or "yonder" or "coke" (as the generic name for any soft-drink)....
I even have some trouble telling the difference between the drawl and twang, although the Upstate of South Carolina(where I am) has a more of a twang.

Now, obviously, I wouldn't confuse say Boston with a Southern accent but I might confuse Boston with say, Rhode Island or New York.
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Old 12-28-2008, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guestposter24 View Post
but I might confuse Boston with say, Rhode Island or New York.

Rhode Island has more of a Boston accent. They're only about an hour from Boston, as opposed to about 3-4 from NYC.
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Old 12-28-2008, 05:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
Rhode Island has more of a Boston accent. They're only about an hour from Boston, as opposed to about 3-4 from NYC.
I've heard both and can hear the similarities but I might confuse them with a New York one.
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Old 12-28-2008, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guestposter24 View Post
I've heard both and can hear the similarities but I might confuse them with a New York one.

Boston and NY accents can sound a little similar to people not from the northeast, but to us they're totally different. People from RI definitely have the Boston accent.
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Old 12-28-2008, 06:31 PM
j33
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
Boston and NY accents can sound a little similar to people not from the northeast, but to us they're totally different. People from RI definitely have the Boston accent.
Very true. I grew up in the Midwest, but I have a lot of family from the northeast (specifically, family from nyc and the Boston area) and I can definitely tell the difference in accents, but a lot of my Midwestern friends here in Chicago cannot. As for me, I have a bit of a hodgepodge; it is mostly Chicago, but I do a few weird things occasionally with my 'r's' and pronounce merry and marry differently (as a result of listening to too many people from the NE talk whist growing up), which puts me firmly out of the 'pure Midwestern' category when it comes to my personal regional accent. As a result, Chicagoans think I sound like I'm from out east, northeasterners think I sound like I'm from the Midwest.
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Old 12-30-2008, 10:30 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guestposter24 View Post
I even have some trouble telling the difference between the drawl and twang, although the Upstate of South Carolina(where I am) has a more of a twang.

Now, obviously, I wouldn't confuse say Boston with a Southern accent but I might confuse Boston with say, Rhode Island or New York.
GP,

Here's how you can tell the difference from the Eastern South (drawl) and the Western South (twang):

When you think of a drawl think something close to the proper and sweet sounding inflection of Billy Graham or Charles Stanley. When you think of a twang think something akin to Toby Keith's accent. Hope this helps Brother.
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Old 12-31-2008, 12:11 AM
 
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Here's another accent link: American Accent Links
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Old 01-01-2009, 01:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
GP,

Here's how you can tell the difference from the Eastern South (drawl) and the Western South (twang):

When you think of a drawl think something close to the proper and sweet sounding inflection of Billy Graham or Charles Stanley. When you think of a twang think something akin to Toby Keith's accent. Hope this helps Brother.
Thank you. I see a little bit of what you're saying. Although, Billy Graham is a native of North Carolina, a state known for more twangy accents. What part of North Carolina he is from or his age may determine otherwise, though.

Everyone makes says the twang sounds so bad but I don't really hear anything "wrong" with Toby Keith's speech that would make people cringe. He doesn't have that thick of an accent to me.

I've always thought the twang was supposed to be more "nasal" sounding.

I think if one person could do a legitimate twang and a legitimate drawl then I'd be able to hear the difference a little better instead of hearing the voice so much.

LOL. I love how I'm asking questions about the twang when I live in the Upstate of South Carolina...which is supposed to be somewhat twangy.
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Old 01-01-2009, 01:55 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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Most of America sounds the same to me, except the South. I notice fewer teenagers adopting their regional accent, even when their parents have a really. I grew up in California, so I with everyone else pretty much.
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