U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-21-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,209,971 times
Reputation: 2641

Advertisements

^^^ i'm with you there. i ate quite a bit of greek style myself. i got addicted

but i have to agree with some, any pizza within 100 mile radius of nyc should be considered nyc-influenced pizza
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-21-2009, 03:23 PM
 
718 posts, read 2,117,220 times
Reputation: 363
Best cities does not mean one place that makes pizza there, when the other 99 joints in the city are garbage. It means having many good places

1. Brooklyn
2. Brooklyn
3. Staten Island
4. Manhattan
5/6 The Bronx, Queens (in no particular order)
7/8/9/10 Connecticut/Long Island/Westchester/Northern NJ (in no particular order)
11. The remainder of America. Everywhere from Florida to Philadelphia to Arizona has that local wannabe joint with the brick oven usually called something such as Il Forno or Napoli Pizza that is usually good. Sometimes the owner is straight from Italy or NY and replicating the real thing. But within a 15 mile radius of this joint, there will be 6 Papa Johns, 8 Pizza Huts, 4 Dominos, and a bunch of local Bob's Pizza and Ted's Pizza shops that serve the same crappy pizza loaded with American cheese and cornmeal. These are not pizza towns.

Sorry Chicago thats not real pizza.

Last edited by DITC; 01-21-2009 at 03:31 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2009, 05:28 PM
 
Location: New England
8,155 posts, read 18,623,806 times
Reputation: 3292
Quote:
Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
but i have to agree with some, any pizza within 100 mile radius of nyc should be considered nyc-influenced pizza
New Haven Pizza is NOT NYC Style, it's New Haven style pizza and a product all it's own...sorry I don't buy your blanket mileage chart.

For the thread:

New Haven Style Pizza all the way...probably the most cult like of a following that I know of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2009, 07:59 PM
 
5,727 posts, read 9,088,192 times
Reputation: 2460
Up in my part of Connecticut, a NW suburb of Hartford (140 miles from NYC) we had only Greek Pizza in town. Nothing remotely close to NY Style though that has probably changed today as there are a couple of new places in town that I've yet to try.

New Haven Style seems to be a close cousin of authentic Neapolitan while NYC Style, being similar to both in that it has a thin crust in the middle of the pizza, differs in that it is not usually charred during cooking and has very puffy outer crust that rings the pizza.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2009, 02:48 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660
It's quite simple people...I will repeat this again. There are only three cities in the entire United States who made pizza into the popular American styles it is featured in today...St. Louis style , Chicago style, and New York style. Any other city claiming to have its own style of pizza most likely just borrowed from one of these three styles. New York, Chicago, and St. Louis are undoubtedly the top three pizza cities in the country simply because these three cities have had the most influence on the type of pizzas and styles of pizzas America has to offer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2009, 04:54 AM
 
5,727 posts, read 9,088,192 times
Reputation: 2460
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
It's quite simple people...I will repeat this again. There are only three cities in the entire United States who made pizza into the popular American styles it is featured in today...St. Louis style , Chicago style, and New York style. Any other city claiming to have its own style of pizza most likely just borrowed from one of these three styles. New York, Chicago, and St. Louis are undoubtedly the top three pizza cities in the country simply because these three cities have had the most influence on the type of pizzas and styles of pizzas America has to offer.
Not true. Greek immigrants brought their pizza to America long before St. Louis Style was a gleam in the eye of its residents. Provel cheese was not even invented until after World War Two. And St. Louis Style has even less name recognition than New Haven or Greek Style. St. Louis Style has only limited regional appeal much like New Haven Style. I've never heard of any pizza parlors outside of Missouri that sell St. Louis Style. Conversely, there are a few New Haven Style pizza joints in areas of the country outside of Connecticut. I believe there is one in Chicago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2009, 06:04 AM
 
Location: New England
8,155 posts, read 18,623,806 times
Reputation: 3292
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
It's quite simple people...I will repeat this again. There are only three cities in the entire United States who made pizza into the popular American styles it is featured in today...St. Louis style , Chicago style, and New York style. Any other city claiming to have its own style of pizza most likely just borrowed from one of these three styles. New York, Chicago, and St. Louis are undoubtedly the top three pizza cities in the country simply because these three cities have had the most influence on the type of pizzas and styles of pizzas America has to offer.
Totally totally wrong. It's not so simple "person". Sit and learn.

Frank Pepe in New Haven was NOT a product of NYC. He was/is a product of Maiori, IT.
Upon returning, he soon landed a job working at a bakery on Wooster Street, which was a much better fit for him. [2] One day, for whatever reason, he flattened some dough and threw on some goodies--perhaps olive oil, oregano, and anchovies. What came out of the coal-fired oven was history. He called his creation "apizza" [ah-BEETS], from the old Italian slang. Pepe began walking through the Wooster Square market and sold his "tomato pies" off of a special headdress that he wore on his head.
Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pepe's and Sally's are consistently rated among the best pizzerias in the United States, giving this geographically-limited pizza style considerable culinary and historical importance
New Haven-style pizza - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hey look a quick search shows New Haven Pizza showing up in:

San Diego:
San Diego Metropolitan Magazine - Loving New Haven-Style Pizzas (http://www.sandiegometro.com/2008/sep/40under40/mangini.php - broken link)

PA:
New Haven Style Pizza West Chester | Pizza place in West Chester | Restaurant menus, reviews and maps on urbanspoon.com

Florida:
New Haven Style Pizza at Bobalu's Southern Cafe in the Florida Keys - Associated Content

Washington DC:
Pete's New Haven Style Apizza in Washington, DC: Reviews and details on washingtonpost.com

And on and on.

New Haven Style Pizza is it's own. It's not based on NY. Sorry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2009, 06:17 AM
 
5,727 posts, read 9,088,192 times
Reputation: 2460
And don't forget Sicilian pizza - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2009, 06:22 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660
Ok, so New Haven style pizza...make that four. That's it. And Greek style...and if you want to count it, Mexican. So five.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2009, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,159,509 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by jman650 View Post
Well for starters, if I was that waiter and you came at me like a five year old that hadn't been taught their manners yet, telling me, "this pizza is disgusting," I wouldn't apologize either. You're lucky he didn't tell you to get the hell out if you hate it so much. Who is NY would have apologized if you came at them like that?

As for good pizza in SF, there's plenty if you aren't close-minded and ranking it on how closely it emulates NY pizza, which you most likely are. Places like Pizza Orgasmica & Toto's Pizza use a cornmeal crust which is delicious. Goat Hill Pizza uses a sourdough crust which I also like. Zorba's Pizza has a Greek-style combination pizza that is my personal favorite. But if you're looking for NY style, you should stay in New York.

I'm not sure what kind you tried there, North Beach Pizza doesn't even rank among my favorites. Pizza snobs that want whatever is Neapolitan and falls under NY criteria seem to like Arinell's Pizza in SF and Amici's East Coast Pizzeria. I personally think they're okay at best, and would choose Round Table before either of them.

The only pizza I've actually tried in NY was absolutely unimpressive. I had it a few years ago at a random spot in Little Italy, and I thought Sbarro at any mall USA is better. That's why I'm curious to try what is thought to be the best in NY (Lombardi's? Ray's maybe?) b/c what I tried did not even approach living up to all the hype. I always hear that any pizza on the East Coast is better than anything in California, blah, blah, blah...and my only experience sure proved that to not be true. I hope it gets better than what I had that time.
This is all fairly subjective.

I lived in BOTH New York City and San Francisco...but I grew up in Michigan...so I really have no reason to select SF or NYC one over the other.

BUT....NYC was pretty impressive for pizza....both cities have 'Little Italy' sections...so I think its fair to say Italian influence in SF....not that I recall 'Little Italy' being THE place for pizza, but just saying in general.

Anyways, the pizza in NYC blew me away...the city is LARGE...and there are all kinds of local pizza shops all over the city...and I recall a large number of them were actually Italians speaking Italian in the pizza restaurant! Now I'm not saying you need to have Italians making you your pizza...but it certainly adds some pizazz and legitimacy to it!

SF had good pizza...but, well, NYC just had incredible memorable pizza. I am actually sitting here re-tasting and re-living my pizza experiences in NYC, and it was GOOD...I can't really recall SF pizza places and recalling the tastes and smells...although I do admit I also had some very good pizza in SF as well.

Anyways, NYC wins.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top