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Old 03-30-2009, 11:20 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,268,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Pittsburgh's German district seemed smallish and run down - though I did see some really cool olde half timbered houses. I mention it because I want to recommend Max's German restaurant - Wunderkind!

Helen Ga is more of a gimmick than authentic german.
The thread titles is "German inspired cities or towns"...it doesn't mention anything about authentic.

Helen, GA is obviously German inspired...why does that automatically mean it's a gimmick?
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Old 04-13-2009, 09:16 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Mainly the Midwest I would say. Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, and St. Louis have HEAVY German influence. St. Louis' Anheuser Busch is its main trademark of German influence.
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Old 04-13-2009, 11:14 AM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,046,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Mainly the Midwest I would say. Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, and St. Louis have HEAVY German influence. St. Louis' Anheuser Busch is its main trademark of German influence.
Don't forget the Northeast. Aforementioned Pittsburgh, plus Philadelphia, Baltimore, Buffalo, Rochester and NYC (notably Brooklyn, Bronx and Manhattan) all had extensive German settlement bot pre- and post- Civil War.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Houston/Hill Country
8 posts, read 10,176 times
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The Texas Hill Country (New Braunfels, Fredericksburg, ect), for sure! Leavenworth, Washington -- yes! I'm 2nd gen GA. I live in Texas, but the rest of my family is between St. Louis and Columbia, MO.
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Old 10-28-2012, 03:35 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,925,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Mainly the Midwest I would say. Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, and St. Louis have HEAVY German influence. St. Louis' Anheuser Busch is its main trademark of German influence.
Replace that with had,past tense. There is nothing German about those cities any more and they are definitely not what the OP is looking for.
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Old 10-28-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,565 posts, read 2,567,767 times
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It seems like the German influence is pretty diluted/assimilated at this point. There are lots of areas with German heritage, but the people are just Americans with funny last names like Stoltzfus and Hochenderfer at this point.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
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Always heard North Dakota has a lot of families that still speak some German at home.
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Old 10-29-2012, 02:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob702 View Post
Replace that with had,past tense. There is nothing German about those cities any more and they are definitely not what the OP is looking for.
There are still pockets of German culture quite alive, but being ethnic German in the US has not been popular since 1916.

I am the first generation in my family not to be fluent in "die spreche", though I do know enough to get around, thats pretty good since my ancestors were 48'ers.

There still exists some German culture here in STL. There are several Stammtisch societies and the German cultural society is still pretty active, though there numbers are getting older every year. i am sure the same exists for Cinci and Milwaukee.

Hermann Mo is where my family is from has made a pretty good effort at staying German, amazing when you considor that small towns are one of the places where pressure to "Americanize" is the strongest.


Historic Hermann, MO, Heart of Missouri Wine Country
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Old 10-29-2012, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 22,480,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven1976 View Post
I really love the culture of Germany. I haven't been able to go there yet, but hopefully one day. What I want to know, is there any particular city or state that has it's own large German population. I'm looking for a place like a Chinatown, but German, where I could get German food, hear people speak German, shop, maybe some architecture, etc.

There must be somewhere in the US
Minnesota is almost 30% German:

Minnesota Family Historian: Ethnicity in Minnesota (Another Chart, plus Commentary)

New Ulm, MN, home of August Schell Brewing Co, is one town that comes to mind right away as one which has a heavy German influence. Hermann's Monument is a nice place to visit, and they also have a 45-foot tall Glockenspiel in a town park.

Hermann Heights Monument - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-30-2012, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
8,379 posts, read 8,369,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Trafford View Post
There are still pockets of German culture quite alive, but being ethnic German in the US has not been popular since 1916.

I am the first generation in my family not to be fluent in "die spreche", though I do know enough to get around, thats pretty good since my ancestors were 48'ers.

There still exists some German culture here in STL. There are several Stammtisch societies and the German cultural society is still pretty active, though there numbers are getting older every year. i am sure the same exists for Cinci and Milwaukee.

Hermann Mo is where my family is from has made a pretty good effort at staying German, amazing when you considor that small towns are one of the places where pressure to "Americanize" is the strongest.


Historic Hermann, MO, Heart of Missouri Wine Country
Very true.

When my Mom was a little girl during WWI in Flat River, Missouri (now Park Cities), most of the ethnic Germans were run out of the town which was heavily French origin. Mom was taunted by her "friends" with slurs like "Kaiser kid", "heinie", etc. A lot of frienships were strained for her.

My Grandpa was ethnic German, but Grandma was of the French background, so the family was allowed to stay there.
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