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Old 12-26-2008, 03:59 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,296,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWereRabbit View Post
By including Johns Hopkins and Georgetown you are recognizing the northeast as just 9 states (For the record, Both myself and the US census bureau would agree with you on this). So these 9 States have 13 of the top 30 US universities. 13/30 top universities in an area with just 18% of the US population and a miniscule fraction of the nation's land area. The remaining 17 are "OUTSIDE of the Northeast"... Is this supposed to be impressive? You provided us with a list of very fine schools but all you are proving is that almost half of the top 30 (by your list. not mine) are in the Northeast. You seem to be backing up the point that the Northeast has the most of the most prestigious universities, and you have convinced me!
It proves MY point, not yours...all the best universities are NOT in the Northeast. Who cares how far apart they are - that has nothing to do with the topic. Your Northeast-centric mind set is very much noted.

Actually, the 17 universities that are not in the Northeast are located in just 10 states - 4 in CA, 3 in N.C., 2 in IL, 1 in TN, MD, GA, TX, VA, IN, and MO.
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Old 12-26-2008, 04:52 PM
 
5,536 posts, read 5,991,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
It proves MY point, not yours...all the best universities are NOT in the Northeast. Who cares how far apart they are - that has nothing to do with the topic. Your Northeast-centric mind set is very much noted.

Actually, the 17 universities that are not in the Northeast are located in just 10 states - 4 in CA, 3 in N.C., 2 in IL, 1 in TN, MD, GA, TX, VA, IN, and MO.
When talking about high tech and best universities, we should refer to technical schools, not any school. The main issue are universities that conduct a high degree of advanced research.
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Old 12-26-2008, 04:57 PM
 
5,536 posts, read 5,991,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
...and Atlanta has Equifax, Cox Communications, American Software, Scientific-Atlanta, Earthlink, Integrated Broadband, EMS Technologies, Logility, Premier Global, etc...

North Carolina is also known for having a concentration of hi tech companies...Research Triangle Park near Raleigh, Piedmont Triad Research Park in Winston-Salem (associated with Wake Forest), North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis (associated with UNC, Duke, N.C. State), and University Research Park in Charlotte.

Actually RTP is the largest research park in the U.S. (and on par with Silicon Valley), with 280 companies and 39,000 employees.

Another large and prominent research park...Cummings Research Park in Huntsville with 225 companies and 23,000 employees.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWereRabbit View Post
All that aside, in regards to the OP: The high-tech industry is one of the most important industries for Boston's economy. Obviously there is MIT but there is also a slew of important high-tech centers on route 128 and 495- The Boston area's beltways. These high-tech areas are not nearly as important as they were in the 50s-80s but are still substantial. Boston also has several extremely good hospitals which constantly require technologically-inclined professionals. Of all states, Massachusetts employees the sixth most people in the high-tech industries (I'm not sure of 3-5 though I would assume California and Texas take the gold and silver). However, by percentage, Massachusetts is number 2 on the list with 86 out of every 1,000 private-sector employees employed by the high-tech industry. Yes, Mass has more high-tech workers per capita then everyone except......Uh, whatever state is number 1....probably California.

I don't know enough to say about other cities although I always had it in my head that Atlanta was big in the field. North Carolina and Tennessee too. New York has to be up there simply because it's up there for everything. And Seattle deserves a nod even though PCs suck.
Very interesting info. Yes, Boston was once considered the most important center in the east, but that was years back. I wonder why it declined if so many people are still employed in high tech around Boston. I was under the impression that the employment figures were smaller in recent years.
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Old 12-26-2008, 05:00 PM
 
706 posts, read 1,344,186 times
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The federal government pumped a lot of R&D money into lagging areas since 1930s to even things out.
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Old 12-26-2008, 05:19 PM
 
3,698 posts, read 8,863,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWereRabbit View Post
I don't know enough to say about other cities although I always had it in my head that Atlanta was big in the field. North Carolina and Tennessee too. New York has to be up there simply because it's up there for everything. And Seattle deserves a nod even though PCs suck.
Atlanta is big with communications, like Cox, AT&T Wireless, and the world's largest news network (CNN). Also, one of the top tech schools in the country are there (GA Tech), and Atlanta also has a good size medical center and the CDC.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:02 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,296,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
When talking about high tech and best universities, we should refer to technical schools, not any school. The main issue are universities that conduct a high degree of advanced research.
True...but those are the top 30 national research universities.
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Dorchester
2,602 posts, read 4,325,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
It proves MY point, not yours...all the best universities are NOT in the Northeast. Who cares how far apart they are - that has nothing to do with the topic. Your Northeast-centric mind set is very much noted.

Actually, the 17 universities that are not in the Northeast are located in just 10 states - 4 in CA, 3 in N.C., 2 in IL, 1 in TN, MD, GA, TX, VA, IN, and MO.
I think you should include colleges in your rankings and you'll see what people mean when they say that the northeast is the center of education.
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Old 12-26-2008, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
142 posts, read 314,752 times
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Sorry, but I have to laugh when someone thinks that innovation is coming from the likes of Dell and HP. Are they tech companies ? Yes. Do they innovate ? Hardly.

One of the reasons Massachusetts has fallen behind California in the high tech race is because of venture capital drying and even when it was active; it simply was never as adventurous as the VC firms in Silicon Valley.

Secondly, the hottest growth area in Greater Boston has been Biotech. Cambridge has a plethora of biotech firms and that's where you are seeing some of the best & the brightest from the halls of Academia.

Finally, it seems over the past 10 - 15 years ,whenever a hot technology company would emerge in Mass. it would eventually be acquired by some larger California firm (or IBM, which has acquired many Mass. firms in recent years).
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:15 PM
 
4 posts, read 4,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txguy2009 View Post
It seems that innovation is moving from the northern states towards TX/west coast. You have NASA, JPL, TX Instruments, Dell, HP, TX medical center, all of silicon valley in CA/hi tech stuff in TX, etc.

Why is this? Is it more of a focus on hi-tech education at places like UT, Cal, Rice, etc? I've met a lot of MIT grads here too, which is the real powerhouse in tech education in the north.

Why is this? Do they just focus more on financial jobs on the east coast which doesn't require huge technical understanding (you can be an iBanker or hedge fund guy with a poli sci degree), whereas the jobs in TX and CA are historically engineering, which leads to focus on hi-tech education, which spawns these other industries?
Could be the culture. California and the west coast in general have a laid back culture. I knew something was up when all the Japanese big 3 were setting up all their offices in California starting with the Mazda Miata because all the good ideas were coming out of CA.

CA is newer compared to the east coast. When I went to my bro's graduation in Philly all the buildings are made of old red bricks. It seems every section I saw looked old, even the area near the water, and downtown section where we ate a Philly Cheesteak at Pat & Gino's looked old.

In contrast, the environs where we live in the San Francisco Bay Area look nice and cleaner and newer. By the late 1800's we had already fought many wars on the east coast with the British, with ourselves (Civil War), the Native American Indians, etc.

In contrast, by the late 1890 the population of Los Angeles was 50,000, San Francisco was 300,000, almost all of whom came as a result of the Gold Rush during the 1850's.

So as you can see CA really has not been cultivated or inhabited for very long compared to the east coast. We also don't have much history with the exception of the Spanish Missions, which don't even go that far back.

People on the East Coast have a different mentality. They have what I call "East Coast Charm". They are more talkative and more likely to know their neighbors like in Chicago. Part of this stems from the fact that the population is so dense on the Eastern seaboard compared to the West Coast where everything is spread out.

What is disturbing to me on the East Coast is the presence of undercover law enforcement. You could be following a cop on the freeway and not even know it. In CA, the Highway Patrol cars are black and white. They also have truant officers on the East Coast so if you're kid on the street you could be stopped. I think because of this, people on East Coast tend to look over their shoulders more. It's hard to come up with ideas when you feel under the gun and always have to look over your shoulder or you don't know whether or not the person next to you is a cop and have to watch what you say or think. On the West Coast, we don't have to worry about this kind of things.

Btw - Washington State also has Amazon.
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Old 03-12-2009, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,270,653 times
Reputation: 1819
My dad is a computer programer. About 10 years ago, he had an opportunity to make a decent amount of money in Houston. Some people from his company voluntarily transferred there. This was because their newest technology there was a bit old in NY. Turns out most of them didn't like it out there. They steered my dad away from moving there, so we stayed put on Long Island.

Fast forward a few years, and my dad lost his job after 9/11. Thing is, he never kept up to date on the technology in his field. NY uses the latest technology, so when my dad got laid off, it was really difficult for him to find a job. He knew the old technology that was basically not needed in NYC/Long Island. Turns out a company in Florida still used it, so my dad ended up moving down there and taking that job. He wants to move back to NY, but at this point, he's even further behind in the technology.

I guess the technology is a bit slower in certain areas of the country. This is an example of that.
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