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Old 12-25-2008, 09:58 PM
 
395 posts, read 904,634 times
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It seems that innovation is moving from the northern states towards TX/west coast. You have NASA, JPL, TX Instruments, Dell, HP, TX medical center, all of silicon valley in CA/hi tech stuff in TX, etc.

Why is this? Is it more of a focus on hi-tech education at places like UT, Cal, Rice, etc? I've met a lot of MIT grads here too, which is the real powerhouse in tech education in the north.

Why is this? Do they just focus more on financial jobs on the east coast which doesn't require huge technical understanding (you can be an iBanker or hedge fund guy with a poli sci degree), whereas the jobs in TX and CA are historically engineering, which leads to focus on hi-tech education, which spawns these other industries?
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Old 12-25-2008, 10:20 PM
 
3,681 posts, read 8,851,103 times
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Like you said, different regions of the country focus on different types of industries. In the Midwest, especially in Detroit the auto industry is big, like how steel is the big industry in Pittsburgh. In other parts of the Midwest and Northeast mining is the main job potential. In New York City, finance and fashion are among the many common industries. Boston is actually a hi-tech center, which has many IT jobs as well as robotics. It is also a matter of where the major tech companies HQ is, like Seattle has Microsoft, The Bay Area has Apple and HP, Texas has Dell and EDS, Chicago has Motorola, San Diego has Qualcom, Atlanta has AT&T Wireless, and so on.
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Old 12-25-2008, 10:34 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,982,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txguy2009 View Post
It seems that innovation is moving from the northern states towards TX/west coast. You have NASA, JPL, TX Instruments, Dell, HP, TX medical center, all of silicon valley in CA/hi tech stuff in TX, etc.

Why is this? Is it more of a focus on hi-tech education at places like UT, Cal, Rice, etc? I've met a lot of MIT grads here too, which is the real powerhouse in tech education in the north.

Why is this? Do they just focus more on financial jobs on the east coast which doesn't require huge technical understanding (you can be an iBanker or hedge fund guy with a poli sci degree), whereas the jobs in TX and CA are historically engineering, which leads to focus on hi-tech education, which spawns these other industries?
Good question! I am thinking about that for years, but so far I still don't have a definitive answer. Traditionally, high tech R&D centers were located close to MIT in the east and Berkley on the west coast, with some presence in the south (TX). With the great hi-tech expansion of the 80s, the silicon valley became too expensive and crowded and new ventures moved on to the "sun belt". People were looking for a higher quality of life and lower costs. The big eastern cities were associated with cold weather, high cost, pollution, crime and dirty industries. In short, a low quality of life. Thus, new centers flourished in places like Arizona, TX, NC, FL. People gladly relocated to those areas, attracted by high salaries and relocation expenses paid by the companies. The schools in those places also got a boost and so they became the high tech focus.
Perhaps someone else can weigh in with more reasons for this phenomena.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Pompano Beach, Florida
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Like you said California has Silicon Valley and the Bay Area which is a huge technical hub of the United States. Seattle has Microsoft and Texas has NASA and the largest medical district in the world (located in Houston). I think that's just the way it is. The northeast does much better in public transportation (NYC, Boston, D.C) and has the financial capital of America, NYC. They also have the most prestigous universities in America, so in short every reigon is good at something and the west is without dispute America's tech capital.
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Old 12-26-2008, 09:11 AM
hsw
 
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Need to look at how much net worth for employees has been created by starting companies; examine stock market value of cos. and figure out how much of co. owned by employees (and how much stock already sold by employees)...lots of big tech cos. and entities exist w/nearly no wealthy employees....just lots of weakly paid engineers, often of dubious capability...all engineers aren't created equal

SiliconValley dwarfs anywhere in world in both tech wealth and innovation; consider stock market value of cos. in the corridor from RedwoodShores to SanJose....prob a combination of proximity to Stanford and Berkeley's Engineering Schools (and attraction of smart engineers from U-IL, MIT, etc)...most of world's smartest (and wealthiest) venture capitalists work on Sand Hill Rd, placing bets on next googles, Apples, Intels, Ciscos, Oracles, etc; and VCs generally prefer to invest in cos. that are an easy drive from their offices, so they can more efficiently monitor their investments....nearly no tech cos. of value are based in EastBay near Berkeley

Seattle has Microsoft (in suburban Redmond)...but no significant other tech cos....and no one at MSFT has earned material money for ~10yrs, given its weak stock perf

Bos has EMC (in distant Western burbs), but not much else...though MIT is a good engineering school and is much larger than Stanford Engineering, can't think of many MIT (or Caltech for that matter) alums who have founded valuable tech cos. in SV (or anywhere)...hmmm

Tech (like much of high-powered finance) is based in sprawling suburban office parks, far from silly mass transit and so-called big-city amenities and skylines

Talent (no matter which schools attended) tends to flow toward and concentrate in regions where one is among many other talented people who have some combination of IQ, innovation (both technical and financial) and risk capital to invest in new cos....results speak for themselves as wealth creation is fairly public data
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Old 12-26-2008, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,323 posts, read 9,575,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
Like you said, different regions of the country focus on different types of industries. In the Midwest, especially in Detroit the auto industry is big, like how steel is the big industry in Pittsburgh. In other parts of the Midwest and Northeast mining is the main job potential. In New York City, finance and fashion are among the many common industries. Boston is actually a hi-tech center, which has many IT jobs as well as robotics. It is also a matter of where the major tech companies HQ is, like Seattle has Microsoft, The Bay Area has Apple and HP, Texas has Dell and EDS, Chicago has Motorola, San Diego has Qualcom, Atlanta has AT&T Wireless, and so on.
Hate to tell you, but steel isn't a big industry in Pittburgh anymore..........there isn't even a mill in the city limits!
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Old 12-26-2008, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Pompano Beach, Florida
85 posts, read 238,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
Hate to tell you, but steel isn't a big industry in Pittburgh anymore..........there isn't even a mill in the city limits!
But their football team is named the steelers! Oh the deception
jk lol
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Old 12-26-2008, 01:26 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,282,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
Like you said, different regions of the country focus on different types of industries. In the Midwest, especially in Detroit the auto industry is big, like how steel is the big industry in Pittsburgh. In other parts of the Midwest and Northeast mining is the main job potential. In New York City, finance and fashion are among the many common industries. Boston is actually a hi-tech center, which has many IT jobs as well as robotics. It is also a matter of where the major tech companies HQ is, like Seattle has Microsoft, The Bay Area has Apple and HP, Texas has Dell and EDS, Chicago has Motorola, San Diego has Qualcom, Atlanta has AT&T Wireless, and so on.
...and Atlanta has Equifax, Cox Communications, American Software, Scientific-Atlanta, Earthlink, Integrated Broadband, EMS Technologies, Logility, Premier Global, etc...

North Carolina is also known for having a concentration of hi tech companies...Research Triangle Park near Raleigh, Piedmont Triad Research Park in Winston-Salem (associated with Wake Forest), North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis (associated with UNC, Duke, N.C. State), and University Research Park in Charlotte.

Actually RTP is the largest research park in the U.S. (and on par with Silicon Valley), with 280 companies and 39,000 employees.

Another large and prominent research park...Cummings Research Park in Huntsville with 225 companies and 23,000 employees.

Last edited by DeaconJ; 12-26-2008 at 01:51 PM..
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Old 12-26-2008, 01:38 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,282,040 times
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Originally Posted by FTLkid754 View Post
Like you said California has Silicon Valley and the Bay Area which is a huge technical hub of the United States. Seattle has Microsoft and Texas has NASA and the largest medical district in the world (located in Houston). I think that's just the way it is. The northeast does much better in public transportation (NYC, Boston, D.C) and has the financial capital of America, NYC. They also have the most prestigous universities in America, so in short every reigon is good at something and the west is without dispute America's tech capital.
I keep hearing this information about the nation's most prestigious universities being located in the Northeast, but of the top 30 universities in the U.S., 17 are located OUTSIDE of the Northeast: Stanford, UC- Berkely, Duke, Rice, Emory, UNC-Chapel Hill, Southern Cal, Wake Forest, Virginia, Georgetown, UCLA, Vanderbilt, Notre Dame, University of Chicago, Northwestern, Washington University, Johns Hopkins - a pretty prestigious list of schools...
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Old 12-26-2008, 02:33 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,205,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
I keep hearing this information about the nation's most prestigious universities being located in the Northeast, but of the top 30 universities in the U.S., 17 are located OUTSIDE of the Northeast: Stanford, UC- Berkely, Duke, Rice, Emory, UNC-Chapel Hill, Southern Cal, Wake Forest, Virginia, Georgetown, UCLA, Vanderbilt, Notre Dame, University of Chicago, Northwestern, Washington University, Johns Hopkins - a pretty prestigious list of schools...

By including Johns Hopkins and Georgetown you are recognizing the northeast as just 9 states (For the record, Both myself and the US census bureau would agree with you on this). So these 9 States have 13 of the top 30 US universities. 13/30 top universities in an area with just 18% of the US population and a miniscule fraction of the nation's land area. The remaining 17 are "OUTSIDE of the Northeast"... Is this supposed to be impressive? You provided us with a list of very fine schools but all you are proving is that almost half of the top 30 (by your list. not mine) are in the Northeast. You seem to be backing up the point that the Northeast has the most of the most prestigious universities, and you have convinced me!

All that aside, in regards to the OP: The high-tech industry is one of the most important industries for Boston's economy. Obviously there is MIT but there is also a slew of important high-tech centers on route 128 and 495- The Boston area's beltways. These high-tech areas are not nearly as important as they were in the 50s-80s but are still substantial. Boston also has several extremely good hospitals which constantly require technologically-inclined professionals. Of all states, Massachusetts employees the sixth most people in the high-tech industries (I'm not sure of 3-5 though I would assume California and Texas take the gold and silver). However, by percentage, Massachusetts is number 2 on the list with 86 out of every 1,000 private-sector employees employed by the high-tech industry. Yes, Mass has more high-tech workers per capita then everyone except......Uh, whatever state is number 1....probably California.

I don't know enough to say about other cities although I always had it in my head that Atlanta was big in the field. North Carolina and Tennessee too. New York has to be up there simply because it's up there for everything. And Seattle deserves a nod even though PCs suck.
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