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Old 12-28-2008, 02:57 PM
 
835 posts, read 2,083,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
A lot of us NYers talk with our hands. It's typical of italians, but non-italians do it here too.
That's interesting as it would seem that the stereotypical New Yorker wouldn't have the time to talk with their hands.
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Old 12-28-2008, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
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People around here use their hands a lot too and they say "and that" at the end of all their sentences. And they say "say" before their sentences.

"Say, I have to run to Safeway to get bread, and that."
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Old 12-28-2008, 04:09 PM
 
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Is the tendency to add an "apostrophe-s" on non plural words a Michigan thing? Midwestern?

For example: "I worked at Ford's for 30 years" or "We went to Target's to get shampoo".

All my relatives shop regularly at Kmart's and get their prescriptions filled at Rite-Aid's.
Weird, huh?

Julia
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Old 12-28-2008, 06:37 PM
j33
 
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I wouldn't necessarily call it a regionalism, but it is an urban/suburban-rural mannerism that I've joked about with many of my friends; it is how one relates to the horn of his or her car. Just the other day I as driving out in the country, and had to almost audibly remind myself 'must ... not ... honk' at the slightest provocation as I am apt to do here (along with everyone else, so it doesn't really matter). I say this because I've learned the hard way that being honked at is reacted to in very different ways depending on where you find yourself.
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Old 12-28-2008, 06:44 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,107,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guestposter24 View Post
I thought that in this thread we could discuss physical mannerisms by city/state/region. (Do people move differently?, facial expressions, etc.)
Very interesting topic, GP! I definitely think there IS...but will not post at length until I can get all the particulars in order!
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Old 12-28-2008, 07:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Very interesting topic, GP! I definitely think there IS...but will not post at length until I can get all the particulars in order!
Glad you think so. I always see people in threads writing about mannerisms in their area but they never specify so I thought this would be a way to find out.

I look forward to your comments on this one.
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Old 12-28-2008, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
7,991 posts, read 16,045,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
I wouldn't necessarily call it a regionalism, but it is an urban/suburban-rural mannerism that I've joked about with many of my friends; it is how one relates to the horn of his or her car. Just the other day I as driving out in the country, and had to almost audibly remind myself 'must ... not ... honk' at the slightest provocation as I am apt to do here (along with everyone else, so it doesn't really matter). I say this because I've learned the hard way that being honked at is reacted to in very different ways depending on where you find yourself.
This is true. I'm amazed at how angry my girlfriend gets when We're driving in her home state of Maine (I'm from the Boston area) and I honk at a car to remind them a light is green or to say, "hey... what are you doing" or even a way of saying, "go ahead, you can go in front of me." I guess it's an urban thing. She hits me every time I do it and gets so embarrassed.

I don't know if these are mannerisms, but in New England, we use the word "Wicked" as substitute for "very." Water fountains (the kind you drink from) are called "bubblers" at least in South Eastern Mass and Rhode Island. You can't imagine the looks I get in parts of the country where people use the term, "bubbler" to describe a marijuana smoking device when I say, "I need to go get a drink from the bubbler." Usually shocked and a little nervous.

We drive faster in the Northeast (with the exception of Maine, Vermont and Northern NH) but I think that's an urban thing and not so much a regional thing.

Also, "cutting someone off" is not necessarily an aggressive or mean gesture here in Massachusetts (though it can be if intended to be rude). Many times, it's just an attempt to get to where you need to go. Same for tailgating.... many times it's a way of saying, "move please!" Many Bostonians (and I've noticed this in New York City) turn left for a few seconds after a light has turned red. Not only is this normal, it's almost unoficially accepted... I've seen police officers pretend not to notice.

One more thing... we tend to give directions and distances in "time" here in New England, not mileage. It's not, "15 miles to destination A," it's more like, "it's 15 minutes to destination A."
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Old 12-28-2008, 07:38 PM
 
835 posts, read 2,083,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
This is true. I'm amazed at how angry my girlfriend gets when We're driving in her home state of Maine (I'm from the Boston area) and I honk at a car to remind them a light is green or to say, "hey... what are you doing" or even a way of saying, "go ahead, you can go in front of me." I guess it's an urban thing. She hits me every time I do it and gets so embarrassed.
Lol. I get angry too. "Damn Yankees honking their horns. Where are they going?! Oh I bet it's a reeeal important place."

I haven't heard as many physical mannerisms like how people stand, etc. Anybody have any of those?
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
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Couple observations from a Californian...

-Who moves the fastest, out of California, So Cal, Chicago or New York? So cal'ers talk fast, move fast. I go to a state like Florida (and came back from Mass two months ago), and everyone back there is normal, moving at normal speed. They have a-l-l, t-h-e, t-i-m-e, i-n, t-h-e, w-o-r-l-d. Relative to quick californians. We'd abbreviate it like, qck.

-I think people on the coasts use abbreviations more. They're in an ASAP world. And lots of digital abbreviations.

-Do they still call it "pop" in the midwest or parts of it? In most states its soda.

But the movement thing/fastness is what I notice most.
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Old 12-29-2008, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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I am one that thinks tailgating/honking unless sombody does wait too long at a light is rude. The only time I feel that the horn should be used is to warn somebody of a potential wreck.
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