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Old 03-04-2007, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,736,678 times
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Hello, I've lived and travelled all over the Western US (currently in AZ), but know little about the eastern half of the country. A few years ago I went to the Washington, DC/ Maryland area and was amazed by how green and beautiful it was. There might not be deserts, red rock canyons, and snow-capped peaks, which are certainly exotic, but just having so many trees, with a little bit of humidity for a change felt good. I especially loved the suburban areas in Montgomery county, where even though you're in a major metro area it feels like you're in a forest(to me, at least, coming from Phoenix and Denver), with the trees forming a canopy over the roads. Even the freeways were beautiful, especially driving on 495 over the Potomac River.

So, the question is, what other big cities in the eastern half of the country (other than the Washington/Baltimore area) have that same "forested" feel-- chock full of huge, leafy trees both in and outside of the city? I appreciate your suggestions.
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Old 03-04-2007, 10:45 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,035 posts, read 102,723,474 times
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Pittsburgh, PA
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Old 03-04-2007, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,909 posts, read 12,537,672 times
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Philadelphia and its suburbs are carved out of a forest. In hindsight I think Philly itself got a little too carried away trying to keep up with NYC's growth in the 19th+ 20th centuries and carved up way too much of its forest. It would have been better served being Boston sized, not NY sized.

FWIW Philly still has more trees in its city limits than any city in the usa, and it has the largest urban park in the usa(fairmount park).

Heres a couple photos. Not my photos.

View from behind the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

http://i5.pbase.com/g6/18/747618/2/73904417.wkoPIRer.jpg (broken link)



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Old 03-05-2007, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Concord, NC
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Charlotte, NC. VERY beautiful clean and green city.There is a breath-taking 850+ acre park/nature preserve on the east side of town that we visit about once a week. It's hard to believe such a beautiful gem being in the city limits of a city of 670,000. There are streetcar neighborhoods on the edges of uptown that are soooo beautiful with their huge oaks shading the streets.
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Old 03-05-2007, 06:59 AM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
304 posts, read 1,303,718 times
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The Atlanta metro area is chock full of trees. It was a nice change when we moved here, coming from Boise. There are a lot of pines, but we have plenty of deciduous trees as well.
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Old 03-05-2007, 08:05 AM
 
3,020 posts, read 23,642,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
So, the question is, what other big cities in the eastern half of the country (other than the Washington/Baltimore area) have that same "forested" feel-- chock full of huge, leafy trees both in and outside of the city? I appreciate your suggestions.
This is not an accident. Many if not most eastern cities / towns will have this idea of "Green Space" incorporated into them. Part of it goes way back in history when educated type folks were fascinated by various flora, trees and brush, anything growing. It was common to have elaborate gardens and it was almost a oneupmanship type game. Might be traced back to Europe where this idea was also practiced from ancient times. Italy, France, England big time practices.

You also get this idea of arboetums where it is a "Collection" of plants, the more types, the more exotic the higher your status. Many cities will have arboretums, including cities like Honolulu. Some might even go to the extremes to grow in a sort of greenhouse. So if it didn't grow naturally or not in the right place or didn't even exist, they planted it. Aka, NYC with Central Park. Find a lot of it in Florida. Put the Green Stuff into peoples lives up close and personal. Guys like Fredrick Law Olmstead, sort of on the theory it would civilize the masses.

Boston has a Green Belt called the Boston Emerald Necklace and like many cities the idea grew over time. Some places like Washington DC are "Planned Cities" from the start. Boston Commons thru an area known as the Fens (Fenway, part of it is like a swamp) out thru the Jamaicaway or as the locals might called it Jammed-aica Way, ended in an Arboretum. If you want trees close, they got em. Big suckers along that twisting sucide alley that became a major commuting path. Two way, narrow, curvy roadway with Boston drivers going both ways inches apart, no center divider, major trees on the outside some inches away. Some ideas where great in their original form but like most things in Boston, they got things a bit too dense. What the tourists love is not so practical, lot of accidents where people run into trees. In its original sense was sort of an upper class neighborhood where you would trot thru in a buggy and enjoy the nature of it all.

So yes you are going to find it all over the eastern US, everybody copied the next guy and maybe tried to out do their accomplishment. Lots of smaller towns got into the act. The one negative became as the lawyers got more hungry, many towns got sued because motorists claimed the trees was a cause of accidents. Some even went so far as to cut them down.

Pretty common to have lots of trees in town. It is not a recent thing. Some places are under threat because of various foreign bugs or whatever, like with certain types of elm, maple, etc. The entire subject has a lot history and twists to how it all happened the way it did.
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Old 03-05-2007, 08:43 AM
 
3,042 posts, read 8,094,923 times
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Philadelphia PA,

Charleston SC

Raliegh Durham NC

Williamsburg VA

portland Maine

Savannah GA

Atlanta GA

Greenville SC

Richmond VA

Charlottesville VA

Albany NY
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Old 03-05-2007, 05:52 PM
 
Location: The Denver, CO area
435 posts, read 1,678,091 times
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Wilmington, NC
Asheville, NC

Last edited by lovethebigcity; 03-05-2007 at 06:06 PM.. Reason: fixed spelling
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Old 03-05-2007, 06:03 PM
 
Location: In the woods of Maine
105 posts, read 219,672 times
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How "big" of a city are you talking? Have you looked at New Hampshire? There are few places more beautiful (IMHO) than the White Mountain area of NH. I currently live in Maine & pretty much the entire state is covered in big, beautiful trees, but the waterfront city of Portland, the capital city of Augusta & the Queen city of Bangor are the only real "hubs" here.
While "Cosmic" has a rather depressing, typically New England view of things, Boston remains a lovely city. (if, indeed, a crazy place to drive. Hold onto your hats if you want to get a car through!).
Nothing beats doing the research & then planning a visit! Happy hunting!
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Old 03-05-2007, 07:15 PM
 
3,020 posts, read 23,642,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aulani View Post
While "Cosmic" has a rather depressing, typically New England view of things, Boston remains a lovely city. (if, indeed, a crazy place to drive. Hold onto your hats if you want to get a car through!).
Nothing beats doing the research & then planning a visit! Happy hunting!
Gee I never knew I was depressed or had a typical New England anything. I was just a transplant Ohio farm boy that stayed far too long. And then finally escaped when "They" were not looking.

Boston was a lovely city before "They" screwed it up by trying to make it into another Dallas. The trees had nothing to do with it. If you are just a tourist, you can believe you have found Paradise, then you start to find out about all the rest of the stuff.

There is also tree belts in the outer reaches which are managed by the MDC, also thru Mattapan and a bunch of other places. Trees all over the place, the back way from Hyde Park up into West Roxbury is total woods. I used to go up there to release all the coons I trapped. City coons were lost out in the woods, most probably wound up in High Point Village. Lots of trees even in Franklin Park, watch out for guys hiding behind them.
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