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Old 08-30-2018, 05:48 PM
 
29,908 posts, read 27,355,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Ozark culture is an extension of upper-South/Appalachian culture. It's completely Southern and I don't see how there would be any debate about that.
Maybe because the Ozarks extend into the Midwest?
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Old 08-30-2018, 08:29 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
Reputation: 13287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
Culture can change. 120 years ago the Ozarks were as southern as one can get. Just prior to the civil war all Southerners were evicted from the KC counties in Missouri, most went to the Ozarks and never left. Fast forward 50-100 years and the Ozarks became a popular vacation and retirement area for midwesterners, and its had a large cultural shift. The Ozarks are still fairly southern, especially some rural areas, but Branson and the main lakes are majority midwestern. These places saw population booms and nearly everyone came from the midwest. Hearing real southern accents in Branson is fairly rare. Branson is only about 15% Baptist which is typically an important indicator for southern culture.
Branson is not very much like the Midwest at all, and has much more in common with the South. The Lake of the Ozarks area is a mixture of the South and the Midwest. There are no lakes in that area, only reservoirs, that are inferior to naturally occurring lakes. Many people in the Midwest go north in the summer to the Northwoods lakes as many city people have cabins, cottages, and properties in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, etc. However, some people must enjoy the heat, humidity, torrid sun, and bugs of the Ozarks.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Illinois
255 posts, read 114,383 times
Reputation: 294
No its not the South.

The South are the states and/or areas where slavery was "the way of life."

Missouri does indeed have such an area. Its called the Booneslick or Little Dixie. Its a 10-15 county area in the north central part of the state.

There was no use for slavery in the Ozarks because you couldn't grow cash crops there.

Rather, the Ozarks, due to their remote nature, became a refuge of the persecuted christian groups of the day specifically Jehova's Witnesses, Pentacostals and fringier baptist and non-denominational christian churches.

As Granite points out the lakes in this region are man made, however they are quite beautiful. I won't engage in any better/worse discussion, but you don't have to worry about blood sucking leaches in Missouri lakes like you do in Northwoods lakes.

In my opinion what makes the Ozarks great are the thousands of natural cold springs that feed dozens of beautiful crystal clear navigable rivers. You can even white water Kayak on the St. Francis river.
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Old 08-30-2018, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,377 posts, read 1,194,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
You would absolutely cringe like never before if you could hear how annoyingly twangy the Minnesota accent sounds to Southern and Lower Midwestern ears.

Have you ever seen the movie Fargo? That's Minnesota lite.
Fargo is one of my favorite movies, actually.

The woman who played the female prostitute wearing the cat sweater was actually the dialect coach for the film. She had to teach people (many of the actors native Minnesotans) how to really dig in and grind those vowels.

If you want to see another Coen brothers movie that portrays a more accurate Minnesota accent, try A Serious Man.

Generally, if you hear someone with a thick Minnesota accent, it's a person over 70 years old and/or from a rural area. Every once in a great while, a commercial for a local business will play on TV and it's just as jarring to me when Bob selling garage doors has that nasally drone.
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Old 08-31-2018, 06:59 AM
 
419 posts, read 127,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
Fargo is one of my favorite movies, actually.

The woman who played the female prostitute wearing the cat sweater was actually the dialect coach for the film. She had to teach people (many of the actors native Minnesotans) how to really dig in and grind those vowels.

If you want to see another Coen brothers movie that portrays a more accurate Minnesota accent, try A Serious Man.

Generally, if you hear someone with a thick Minnesota accent, it's a person over 70 years old and/or from a rural area. Every once in a great while, a commercial for a local business will play on TV and it's just as jarring to me when Bob selling garage doors has that nasally drone.
The accent is very mild in the Twin Cities, but as soon as you get outside of there, it's thick.

I wouldn't consider Rochester rural, but walk into a bar there and just listen to people talk. It's right out of "Fargo" or "Drop Dead Gorgeous".
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Old 08-31-2018, 07:25 AM
 
2,002 posts, read 1,017,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post
The accent is very mild in the Twin Cities, but as soon as you get outside of there, it's thick.

I wouldn't consider Rochester rural, but walk into a bar there and just listen to people talk. It's right out of "Fargo" or "Drop Dead Gorgeous".
Anyone with a brain knows that the accents in the movie Fargo, are grossly exaggerated. Well, anyone knows that, who doesn't have an agenda.

As far as Rochester goes, you do realize that there are people living there from all over the US, right? Would it be coincidental that you would only hear those who are native and, for some reason, all speak with an accent thicker than you hear anywhere else? You are trying, but I live in WI, currently, and have been to Minnesota many times, and I have never encountered what you are trying to push on us. These posts should probably get deleted, as they are off topic for this thread.
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Old 08-31-2018, 07:42 AM
 
419 posts, read 127,957 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Anyone with a brain knows that the accents in the movie Fargo, are grossly exaggerated. Well, anyone knows that, who doesn't have an agenda.

As far as Rochester goes, you do realize that there are people living there from all over the US, right? Would it be coincidental that you would only hear those who are native and, for some reason, all speak with an accent thicker than you hear anywhere else? You are trying, but I live in WI, currently, and have been to Minnesota many times, and I have never encountered what you are trying to push on us. These posts should probably get deleted, as they are off topic for this thread.
It seems to me you're trying to push an agenda that this accent doesn't really exist, so people view the area differently. It does. Get over it. Accents aren't determinate of intelligence level, education level, or anything other than local speech patterns.

Like I said, the accent is exaggerated, but not that much. I moved back to north Iowa after living in the Des Moines are for about a decade, and it really surprised how many people spoke in such a noticeable accent - especially in the Rochester area.
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Old 09-02-2018, 03:34 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 18 days ago)
 
8,682 posts, read 10,836,637 times
Reputation: 12731
I spent some time in Springfield, Mo and it didn't feel like the South to me at all.
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Old 09-02-2018, 05:42 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,768 posts, read 2,556,427 times
Reputation: 2982
i fell in love with the ozarks when I lived in MO for a few months. I guess I would say mid western.
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Old 09-02-2018, 06:42 PM
 
2,002 posts, read 1,017,298 times
Reputation: 2667
It might be a little of both. Actually, it is a little of both. I'm a little unsure as to why this is a thread that has this many pages, so far. It's both...look at a map. Arkansas is not a Midwestern state, nor is Oklahoma.
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